Cameron Peters

New teachers’ union chief puts equity first
Kim Anderson returns to the National Education Association amid turbulent political environment

Kim Anderson will be the first to tell you she got lucky. She grew up in Fairfax County, Virginia, the well-heeled D.C. suburb, where she attended “one of the best public school systems in the country,” before receiving an undergraduate degree from the College of William & Mary, one of the country’s top public colleges.

Now, she’s taken on a new role as executive director of the National Education Association, the nation’s largest teachers’ union, with the hopes of making schools everywhere as good as the ones she attended.

Personal experience with guns helps shape how 2020 Democrats talk about them
Presidential candidates are united on background checks, but split on buybacks, licensing

For some Democratic presidential candidates, hunting is a family affair. Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan says he hunts ducks “at least once a year, with our oldest son.” Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, who hunts deer, talks about “creating lifelong memories with our kids.”

Family, tradition and personal hunting experience are integral to the way these candidates speak about guns — and how they pitch gun control measures to voters from areas of the country with a strong history of gun ownership.

Father of slain journalist seeks regulation of internet content
Activist says Google not doing enough to police violent footage available on YouTube

Following Saturday’s mass shooting at a mall in El Paso by a suspect who appears to have been steeped in a white supremacist internet subculture, activist Andy Parker on Tuesday accused Google executives of lying about their efforts to remove objectionable content, including footage of shootings, from its YouTube platform.

Parker also called for a new law revising the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which regulates online platforms, so that it would prohibit “targeted harassment, incitement, and murder videos” and open up technology companies to civil and criminal liability.

Plans to erase student debt gain steam in presidential race
2020 Democrats split on who should benefit, but even moderates back some free college

In a crowded field of Democratic presidential contenders jockeying for progressive support, debt-free college and student debt cancellation are emerging as marquee policy proposals — ones that could appeal to the one in five Americans who carry student debt.

Plans vary, and there is wide disagreement about who should benefit and how such policies should be funded. But even the more moderate candidates in the field are calling for at least some access to free college, in recognition of the growing burden student loans have placed on a generation of graduates. Polling, however, shows its importance to voters varies sharply with age.

They left Congress. Where are they now?
Ex-members are ‘recovering,’ ‘diving back into reality-land’ after 115th Congress

Ryan A. Costello, a 42-year-old Pennsylvania Republican who retired after the 115th Congress following a court-ordered redistricting that made reelection difficult, does “a lot of Legos” now with his two children, ages 2 and 5.

Luis V. Gutiérrez, an Illinois Democrat who stepped down after 13 terms, is learning to swim and play the guitar, and hopes to be able to perform a Beatles song by Christmas.

A closer look at what the alumni of the 115th Congress have been up to
Some have moved on to other offices, consulting or punditry. Some are plotting their way back

One hundred and fifteen former House members and senators, who served full or partial terms in the 115th Congress, are newly adapting to life after Capitol Hill. CQ Roll Call finds them in a wide variety of roles, ranging from the expected to the unusual.

Three lawmakers from the last Congress have died, either while serving or since leaving office. Here’s what the rest of the alums have been up to. 

Flatware gets its day in NDAA
House amendment would require Defense Department to buy from domestic manufacturers

As the House slogs through more than 400 amendments to the annual Pentagon policy bill, debate has centered on the deployment of U.S. troops to the southern border, a potential ban on some lower-yield nuclear weapons, war authorizations and … flatware.

Yes, flatware. Cutlery. Knives and forks and spoons. One of the 439 amendments put forth would require the Defense Department to buy “stainless steel flatware” and “dinner ware” from domestic, rather than foreign, manufacturers.

Trudeau warns about reopening trade talks, but is ‘optimistic’
House Democrats seen as major obstacle to approving USMCA trade agreement

After a visit to the White House and Capitol Hill on Thursday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he is optimistic about the prospects of the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement, but added he hoped obstacles in the U.S. don’t lead to reopening negotiations.

Trudeau, speaking at a news conference at the Canadian embassy, lauded the “very strong and positive relationship with the United States” that he said came out of USMCA negotiations that were “contentious at times.”