Roll Staff

Roll Call photographer Tom Williams wins WHNPA’s Political Photo of the Year
Photo editor Bill Clark picks up two more 2019 White House News Photographer Association awards

Roll Call staff photographer Tom Williams has won the distinguished Political Photo of the Year award in the White House News Photographers Association’s 2019 Eyes of History contest.

The same photo, featuring Vice President Mike Pence in the Capitol, won first prize in the On Capitol Hill category of the visual awards. 

From the archives: Debbie Dingell’s office homage to the longest serving House member — her husband and predecessor, John
 

Former Rep. John Dingell, D-Michigan, died Thursday at 92. He served over 59 years in Congress, and his legacy lives on in the historical and sentimental objects he collected over the years.

The lobbyists: Roll Call’s people to watch in 2019
Are they worried the new Congress will make war on K Street? Do they look worried?

President Donald Trump looms large on almost every important issue, but it won’t be all about him for some individuals on Roll Call’s list of People to Watch in 2019. 

The financial sector will be learning to survive a less business-friendly environment in the House, and a longtime Democratic lobbyist is well-positioned to lend a hand.

John D. Dingell, legendary former dean of the House, dies
Michigan Democrat’s 60-year tenure was longest in Congress

By DAVID HAWKINGS and NIELS LESNIEWSKI

John D. Dingell, the longest-serving member of Congress in American history and easily the most overpoweringly influential House committee chairman in the final decades of the last century, died Thursday. He was 92 years old. 

Barr nomination to get votes on the Senate floor next week
Comes after 12-10 committee vote, which reflected concerns from Democrats about how he would handle the Justice Department’s special counsel investigation

Updated 5:18 p.m. | William P. Barr is on track to be confirmed as the next attorney general next week.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell moved to limit debate and cut off any filibuster threats against the Barr nomination Thursday, setting up votes as soon as the Senate finishes work on a bipartisan package of public lands bills.

This California congressman wants you to play State of the Union bingo
Mark Takano releases his own ‘official’ game

Drinking games are a proud (or not-so-proud) State of the Union tradition. One congressman is going the wholesome route with a classic game of bingo.

Mark Takano, a California Democrat, tweeted out his version of good old-fashioned fun.

Lawmakers support, with some caveats, Trump’s withdrawal from Russian nuclear weapons treaty
President Trump announced on Friday the U.S. would withdraw — but he left the door open to salvaging the pact

Lawmakers from both parties and U.S. military officials are expressing support — with some caveats — for President Donald Trump’s Friday decision to withdraw from a nuclear weapons treaty with Moscow.

Trump announced on Friday the U.S. would withdraw — but he left the door open to salvaging the pact. 

As lawmakers begin to hash out border security, how do conference committees work?
Roll Call Decoder

A bicameral, bipartisan group of lawmakers is beginning its efforts to hash out a border security agreement on Wednesday as the clock ticks toward another government funding lapse on Feb. 15. The panel is taking the form of a conference committee, regularly used on the Hill to find agreement on legislation passed with different language by each of the chambers.

House passes resolution to set State of the Union for Feb. 5

Any animosity over the delayed State of the Union appeared to be rapidly heading into the rear-view mirror, as the House passed a concurrent resolution providing the chamber host a joint session so Congress can hear from President Donald Trump on Feb. 5. 

Around 3:20 Tuesday afternoon, the House agreed, by unanimous consent, to the concurrent resolution calling for the joint session. Things have happened pretty quickly since the end of the shutdown on Friday. 

Shutdown ends as Trump signs short-term funding deal after House, Senate passage
Senior appropriators named to conference on Homeland Security spending bill

Updated 9:27 p.m. | The longest partial government shutdown in history is over.

The White House announced Friday evening that President Donald Trump had signed a short-term spending measure that will re-open the government for three weeks.

These House Democrats marched to the Senate before Thursday votes
Their message was to urge senators to vote "to end the Trump-McConnell shutdown," Rep. Barbara Lee said.

Democratic House members marched from their chamber to the Senate Thursday afternoon, walking onto the floor just as the upper chamber took votes on two competing proposals that would have reopened government.

Their message is to urge senators to vote “to end the Trump-McConnell shutdown,” Rep. Barbara Lee said.

Democrat-backed plan to reopen government falls short in Senate
The measure would have reopened government temporarily through Feb. 8

The Senate defeated 52-44 through a procedural vote a measure offered by Sen. Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y, that would have reopened government temporarily through Feb. 8.

Schumer's measure, which was an amendment to an overall spending bill, fell short of the 60 votes required to advance. The spending bill passed the House last week.

Trump’s plan to fund wall and reopen government blocked in Senate
The plan did not receive the 60 votes needed to pass the plan

The Senate defeated President Donald Trump's border security plan 50-47 on a procedural vote designed to re-open the government. The measure required 60 votes to pass.

The procedural vote came on an amendment offered by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to a spending measure that combined seven appropriations bills that would have ended the shutdown and provided money for border security, disaster aid and several immigration policy changes.

House schedule next week, for now, looks pretty normal
Weekend work would be required if votes come up regarding shutdown

Things can always change in a hurry, but the House is leaving Washington Thursday to return on Monday — unless, of course members are needed to vote on something to end the partial government shutdown, say, over the weekend. 

During their weekly colloquy to lay out the schedule for the coming week, Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer and Minority Whip Steve Scalise bantered back and forth about the shutdown, assigning blame to one another before getting down to the brass tacks of when the chamber will need to be back next week.

Former Sen. Harris Wofford, who marched with MLK, dies at 92
Pennsylvania Democrat served in administration from John F. Kennedy’s to Bill Clinton’s

Harris Wofford, a former Pennsylvania senator who also served in the administrations of Democratic presidents from John F. Kennedy to Bill Clinton, died Monday night. He was 92.

The Democrat’s life was defined, in many ways, by his commitment to public service. Wofford helped form the Peace Corps and AmeriCorps.

Supreme Court allows transgender troop ban while lawsuits proceed
The ruling was made over objections from the court‘s liberal justices

The Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed the Trump administration to implement its ban on transgender troops, over the objections of the four liberal justices.

Nationwide injunctions from lower courts had stopped the ban for nearly a year. But the court Tuesday allowed a ban of transgender individuals from serving in the U.S. military to go into effect while lawsuits move through the courts. 

Kamala Harris announces on MLK Day she’ll run for president
Former California AG is second black woman to serve in the Senate

California Sen. Kamala Harris announced on Martin Luther King Jr. Day that she is running for president, adding her name to a growing list of Democrats who are positioning themselves to run against President Donald Trump in 2020.

Harris, who was twice elected as California’s attorney general, is only the second black woman to serve in the U.S. Senate.

Pelosi says House will skip recess while government is shut down
Speaker says House will work on legislation to fund agencies like bills that passed earlier in the Senate

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that the House will be in session next week instead of taking a recess week and continue to work on legislation to end the 26-day government shutdown.

“We have canceled our district work period next week to stay here to work on legislation to open up government, to continue our ongoing drumbeat of bills to open up government, starting with bills that the Republicans themselves passed in the Senate but now won’t take up,” Pelosi said. “But we’ll go to the next step next week on that.”

Overheard: At least one Capitol Police officer is no fan of Cheney
Members of the force also weighed in on Trump’s Big Mac feast

— A Capitol Police officer, shortly after the No. 3 House Republican called on Rep. Steve King to resign, exposing a rift among GOP leaders

Another baby ‘M’ for Rep. Brian Mast
Florida Republican and his wife keep the alliteration going with the birth of their fourth child

Brian Mast is barely a week into the new Congress, but he’s already added another title — fourth-time dad.

The Floridan Republican missed House votes this week, and on Thursday he revealed why. Baby Major arrived at 9.3 pounds, 20.5 inches, he tweeted.