Roll Staff

Hey! Robert Mueller relies on CQ
CQ’s transcript service shows up in at least 16 pages of footnotes in Mueller report

Who are you going to call when you need a transcript for official citation in the Mueller report? Why, CQ, of course.

The highly anticipated report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III released Thursday spans nearly 450 pages, but tucked in the footnotes of at least 16 of them is text from transcripts that are available through CQ.

One thing Barr didn’t redact: the f-bomb
The attorney general and his team blacked out many a word, but they let obscenities stand

The special counsel’s report may be groaning with redactions, but there’s one thing the Justice Department didn’t blot out — profanity.

That’s right, we’re talking f-bombs, bastards and your garden-variety bullshit.

How to level up on Tinder using LegiStorm. (Why didn’t we think of this?)
Calling all DC daters: If they work in Congress, their salary is out there. Do with that what you will

All hail Scott, a very savvy congressional intern who called into Gimlet Media’s “Reply All” podcast last week.

This Scott, you see, is dating in D.C., and he believes in doing his due diligence, especially when it comes to the one romantic quality that sets hearts a-fluttering: earning power. 

A missing budget book, weaning a calf and Boris Yeltsin meets Wes Anderson: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of March 11, 2019

While people spent a lot of time wondering why Sen. Mitt Romney blows out birthday candles one at a time, Congress was also busy opining about weaning a calf, sending members to space, and what a Wes Anderson film starring former Russian President Boris Yeltsin would look like....
House Judiciary Committee approves Violence Against Women Act reauthorization

The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday approved, along party lines, 22-11, a bill to reauthorize and expand programs designed to help victims of sexual and domestic violence.

The protections and programs authorized by the 1994 law lapsed during the partial government shutdown last year, but were reinstated in the January short-term fiscal 2019 spending deal. An extension was not included in last month’s deal that provided for spending through the end of fiscal 2019.

Former Rep. Ralph Hall, among the last WWII vets to serve in Congress, dies at 95
Hall, a Democrat-turned-Republican from Texas, served 17 terms

Former Rep. Ralph M. Hall, who left Congress in 2015 as the oldest member at age 91 after losing a primary runoff after decades in office, died Thursday. Hall was 95.

A Democrat-turned-Republican, Hall was born on May 3, 1923, in Fate, Texas. He attended Texas Christian University and the University of Texas, eventually earning a law degree at Southern Methodist University.

Trump nominates GOP fundraiser Kelly Knight Craft for UN ambassador
Former RNC delegate made significant contributions to president’s 2016 campaign

President Donald Trump is nominating Republican fundraiser Kelly Knight Craft to be the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. The Kentucky native currently serves  as the U.S. ambassador to Canada.

The president tweeted his announcement Friday evening. 

Roll Call photographer Tom Williams wins WHNPA’s Political Photo of the Year
Photo editor Bill Clark picks up two more 2019 White House News Photographer Association awards

Roll Call staff photographer Tom Williams has won the distinguished Political Photo of the Year award in the White House News Photographers Association’s 2019 Eyes of History contest.

The same photo, featuring Vice President Mike Pence in the Capitol, won first prize in the On Capitol Hill category of the visual awards. 

From the archives: Debbie Dingell’s office homage to the longest serving House member — her husband and predecessor, John
 

Former Rep. John Dingell, D-Michigan, died Thursday at 92. He served over 59 years in Congress, and his legacy lives on in the historical and sentimental objects he collected over the years.

The lobbyists: Roll Call’s people to watch in 2019
Are they worried the new Congress will make war on K Street? Do they look worried?

President Donald Trump looms large on almost every important issue, but it won’t be all about him for some individuals on Roll Call’s list of People to Watch in 2019. 

The financial sector will be learning to survive a less business-friendly environment in the House, and a longtime Democratic lobbyist is well-positioned to lend a hand.

John D. Dingell, legendary former dean of the House, dies
Michigan Democrat’s 60-year tenure was longest in Congress

By DAVID HAWKINGS and NIELS LESNIEWSKI

John D. Dingell, the longest-serving member of Congress in American history and easily the most overpoweringly influential House committee chairman in the final decades of the last century, died Thursday. He was 92 years old. 

Barr nomination to get votes on the Senate floor next week
Comes after 12-10 committee vote, which reflected concerns from Democrats about how he would handle the Justice Department’s special counsel investigation

Updated 5:18 p.m. | William P. Barr is on track to be confirmed as the next attorney general next week.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell moved to limit debate and cut off any filibuster threats against the Barr nomination Thursday, setting up votes as soon as the Senate finishes work on a bipartisan package of public lands bills.

This California congressman wants you to play State of the Union bingo
Mark Takano releases his own ‘official’ game

Drinking games are a proud (or not-so-proud) State of the Union tradition. One congressman is going the wholesome route with a classic game of bingo.

Mark Takano, a California Democrat, tweeted out his version of good old-fashioned fun.

Lawmakers support, with some caveats, Trump’s withdrawal from Russian nuclear weapons treaty
President Trump announced on Friday the U.S. would withdraw — but he left the door open to salvaging the pact

Lawmakers from both parties and U.S. military officials are expressing support — with some caveats — for President Donald Trump’s Friday decision to withdraw from a nuclear weapons treaty with Moscow.

Trump announced on Friday the U.S. would withdraw — but he left the door open to salvaging the pact. 

As lawmakers begin to hash out border security, how do conference committees work?
Roll Call Decoder

A bicameral, bipartisan group of lawmakers is beginning its efforts to hash out a border security agreement on Wednesday as the clock ticks toward another government funding lapse on Feb. 15. The panel is taking the form of a conference committee, regularly used on the Hill to find agreement on legislation passed with different language by each of the chambers.

House passes resolution to set State of the Union for Feb. 5

Any animosity over the delayed State of the Union appeared to be rapidly heading into the rear-view mirror, as the House passed a concurrent resolution providing the chamber host a joint session so Congress can hear from President Donald Trump on Feb. 5. 

Around 3:20 Tuesday afternoon, the House agreed, by unanimous consent, to the concurrent resolution calling for the joint session. Things have happened pretty quickly since the end of the shutdown on Friday. 

Shutdown ends as Trump signs short-term funding deal after House, Senate passage
Senior appropriators named to conference on Homeland Security spending bill

Updated 9:27 p.m. | The longest partial government shutdown in history is over.

The White House announced Friday evening that President Donald Trump had signed a short-term spending measure that will re-open the government for three weeks.

These House Democrats marched to the Senate before Thursday votes
Their message was to urge senators to vote "to end the Trump-McConnell shutdown," Rep. Barbara Lee said.

Democratic House members marched from their chamber to the Senate Thursday afternoon, walking onto the floor just as the upper chamber took votes on two competing proposals that would have reopened government.

Their message is to urge senators to vote “to end the Trump-McConnell shutdown,” Rep. Barbara Lee said.

Democrat-backed plan to reopen government falls short in Senate
The measure would have reopened government temporarily through Feb. 8

The Senate defeated 52-44 through a procedural vote a measure offered by Sen. Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y, that would have reopened government temporarily through Feb. 8.

Schumer's measure, which was an amendment to an overall spending bill, fell short of the 60 votes required to advance. The spending bill passed the House last week.

Trump’s plan to fund wall and reopen government blocked in Senate
The plan did not receive the 60 votes needed to pass the plan

The Senate defeated President Donald Trump's border security plan 50-47 on a procedural vote designed to re-open the government. The measure required 60 votes to pass.

The procedural vote came on an amendment offered by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to a spending measure that combined seven appropriations bills that would have ended the shutdown and provided money for border security, disaster aid and several immigration policy changes.