Ryan Kelly

How Graham-Cassidy Stacks Up, in One Chart
Comparing the Senate GOP's latest plan, and the House-passed option, to current law

Senate leaders are considering an attempt next week to pass a repeal of the 2010 health care law, while chamber rules still allow for a 50-50 vote option. Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Bill Cassidy, R-La., put together a proposal — after the chamber considered and rejected multiple other options this summer — that they hope will get the repeal over the finish line.

Gillibrand Leads Democrats in Opposing Trump’s Nominees
Parties largely split along partisan lines on president’s pics

On the last day before the August recess, the Senate confirmed 65 of President Donald Trump’s nominees with a single bipartisan voice vote.

That has been a marked difference from the way Democratic senators have approached Trump’s picks for his team. 

Priebus Was One of Shortest-Tenured Chiefs of Staff in History
President Donald Trump’s first chief of staff lasted only 189 days

At 189 days, President Donald Trump’s first chief of staff had the shortest tenure of any who was not serving in an interim capacity or leaving with their president. The position was formally established in 1946.

The next shortest tenure among initial chiefs of staff belongs to President Bill Clinton’s childhood friend, Mack McLarty, who is generally remembered as having been out of his league. McLarty lasted nearly three times as long as Priebus.

How Climate Change Impacts Congressional Districts Over Next 80 Years
A Roll Call analysis also reveals how concerned people are, by district

Two recent studies explored the climate debate at the local level. The authors of a report by Climate Impact Lab, published in Science magazine, ran 29,000 simulations to project the economic damage that could result from climate change between 2080 and 2099 in the U.S.

Researchers at Yale and George Mason universities created a model that estimates opinions on climate change in specific communities. Roll Call combined the two in this analysis, by congressional district.

Spicer’s Departure is Quickest Resignation for Press Secretary Since 1974
Trump’s first press secretary will leave after 223 days in the role

Sean Spicer said on Friday that he would step down next month after just 223 days as White House press secretary. It will be the quickest voluntary exit for the position since Jerald terHorst resigned in 1974 after just a month — in protest of President Gerald Ford’s pardon of former president Richard Nixon. 

Who Can Afford McCain’s Surgery?
What his procedure would cost under different insurance types

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain is currently recovering at home from a supraorbital craniotomy performed at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix on Friday to remove a two-inch blood clot in his brain.

With insurance, the average cost of his surgery is estimated to be anywhere from fully covered to $5,000, depending on the patient’s income and the annual deductible of the insurance plan. Without insurance, the surgery would cost the patient around $100,000.

100 Years of Women: Here's How Many Have Served in Congress
A look at the century since Montana's Jeannette Rankin joined the House

When women’s rights advocate Jeannette Rankin, a Montana Republican, was elected to the House of Representatives a century ago, she noted, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.”

Rankin took office in 1917 — a member of the 65th Congress. Since that time, 281 women have been elected full voting members of the House and 50 have become senators. 

A Long History of Attacks on Members of Congress
A member and aides were shot Wednesday at a baseball practice

The Republican’ congressional baseball team’s practice Wednesday morning in Alexandria, Virginia, was the scene of the shooting of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise. Four others were wounded.  The suspected shooter was killed from the injuries he sustained during gunfire exchanged with Capitol Police officers.

This isn’t the first time members of Congress have been targeted. In fact, there have been more than 20 serious incidents since the late 1800s.

How We Got Here: A Timeline of How Comey Came to Testify Before Senate Intelligence
Comey will reflect upon his interaction's with the president so far this year

By STEPHANIE AKIN and RYAN KELLYCQ Roll Call

It was less than a year ago that then-FBI Director James B. Comey delivered mixed news for the Democratic Party’s nominee for president —Hillary Clinton’s handling of classified material was, “extremely careless,” but he would not bring charges against her in the case.

By the Numbers: Trump’s First Full Fiscal Year Budget Cuts Deep and Wide
Only Defense, Homeland Security and Veterans Affairs departments would be spared

President Donald Trump's first full budget, released Tuesday, proposes big cuts to nearly every department and agency in fiscal 2018, even though they've been tightly constrained by budget caps for the past six years. Here's how the budget compares to estimates of what's currently enacted and to President Barack Obama's final full budget request:

How to Investigate an Administration: Breaking Down the 3 Independent Options
DOJ appoints Robert Mueller as special counsel for Russia inquiry

Between congressional committees and the FBI, there are at least five ongoing investigations into Russia’s alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. elections. Calls from Congress for at least one form of independent review appear to have been answered Wednesday evening when the Justice Department named former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel for the probe. 

The three independent options each have advantages and drawbacks. And they are frequently not exclusive paths — from Watergate to Whitewater, major executive scandals have been investigated simultaneously by congressional select committees and a special, independent counsel working within the DOJ. 

A List of Notable Presidential Firings Since 1951
Most were terminated outright; others left before the White House officially acted

On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump put Washington in a tailspin when he fired FBI Director James B. Comey. Twitter was abuzz with reminiscences of presidential firings-past, so Roll Call set out to catalogue the last 66 years or so of presidents telling top officials to "take a hike."

Here's President Harry S. Truman through Trump:

Members Who Vote With Freedom Caucus Did Better Than Trump in Elections
Trump threatened the group in tweets on Thursday

By RYAN KELLY and SEAN MCMINN 
CQ Roll Call

Though President Donald Trump turned hostile on Twitter toward the conservative House Freedom Caucus on Thursday, his sway with those members’ constituents may not be enough to affect outcomes in the 2018 midterm elections.

Trump’s Cabinet Racks Up ‘No’ Votes in Senate
Congress has delivered more votes against Trump's Cabinet than the last four presidents' Cabinets combined

Last updated at 3:25 p.m. on March 2

With the president historically unpopular, Senate Democrats seem to feel free to go on record against his picks to run executive departments.

Flynn's Tenure as National Security Adviser Historically Brief
Michael Flynn's White House role lasted just 24 days

By RYAN KELLY and SEAN MCMINN CQ Roll Call

Michael Flynn’s resignation Monday after 24 days on the job set a new low for the tenure of a national security adviser. William H. Jackson, who served in the Eisenhower administration, previously had the shortest tenure at about three months.

A Nap Got in the Way of the Last Tied Cabinet Vote in the Senate
If only Vice President Charles G. Dawes had woken up a little sooner …

When Vice President Mike Pence cast his first Senate tiebreaking vote, he accomplished something no other vice president had done before — used his deciding vote as president of the Senate to confirm a Cabinet pick.

While Pence was the first to do so, he wasn’t the first to have had the opportunity. In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge named Charles Warren as his pick for attorney general. Although the Senate was run by his fellow Republicans, Warren’s nomination ran into opposition as senators criticized his connections to lobbyists. Coolidge’s vice president, Charles G. Dawes, was on tap to step in to break a tie if the vote got stalled at 40-40, according to the Senate historical database.

Chart: Presidential Candidates' Tax Returns
Republican candidate Donald Trump breaks from a 40-year tradition

President Richard Nixon released four years of tax returns in 1973 to quell accusations that he was evading taxes. Since then, every candidate for president, except Donald Trump, has released some tax information, ranging from Gerald Ford's summary document to 30 years of Bob Dole's returns.

See how many years of tax information candidates have released before each presidential election:

McMullin Presidential Run an Uphill Battle, per State Filing Deadlines
Reports have surfaced that GOP political operative is launching an anti-Trump campaign

Could a #NeverTrump Republican really launch an independent campaign for president right now? Not a successful one, according to a Roll Call analysis of state filing deadlines for independents to get on the ballot across the U.S.

Evan McMullin, a longtime GOP Hill operative and former CIA officer, is planning a presidential campaign for those Republican loyalists distancing themselves from the party's nominee, Donald Trump. He's launched a website saying just that.

Chart: How the Senate Race Ratings Have Changed Since Early 2015
34 seats are up for election this 2016 cycle

As Roll Call's Alex Roarty reported on Wednesday , new candidates and disappointing nominees have changed expectations for 2016 Senate races since the start of the election season.  

No races have seen bigger shifts than the ones in Indiana and Florida, where the return of political stars Evan Bayh and Marco Rubio have turned each election on its head.    

Fact-Checking the Clintons' Claim on the Economy
Does the economy really do better under Democrats?

Hillary Clinton often says the economy does better under Democrats.  

CQ Roll Call dove into an April 2016 report  which finds that actually, they might be right.