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Republicans Cancel Vote on Health Care Bill

Members for the House Freedom Caucus including chairman Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., center, Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, left, and Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, make their way to a procedural vote in the Capitol before the vote on the American Health Care Act later in the day, March 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Friday canceled a scheduled vote on the Republican bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, in what could be a catastrophic blow to the party’s seven-year campaign against the law.

Cheers could be heard from the House Democratic cloakroom as the news spread.

Van Hollen Frames Trump Proposals as Dicey for GOP
DSCC chief cites health care plan, budget as politically tricky

Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen says President Donald Trump’s proposals betray his supporters. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Spicer: Ryan Has Done ‘Everything He Can’ on Health Care Bill
Speaker returns to Capitol after meeting with Trump as vote nears

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc.,is meeting with President Donald Trump ahead of the House's vote on health care. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Whip List: Obamacare Rollback Vote Nears Breaking Point
A handful more GOP opponents would doom measure

House Freedom Caucus members, from left, Raúl R. Labrador of Idaho, Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Jim Jordan of Ohio make their way to a procedural vote in the Capitol on Friday before the vote on the Republican health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Enough Republicans appeared on the verge of voting against the House health care overhaul to require frantic lobbying and send House Speaker Paul D. Ryan to the White House as floor debate got underway Friday.

At least 20 House Republicans had already signaled opposition since the end of a Thursday evening huddle with top Trump administration officials in which Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney delivered an ultimatum, saying President Donald Trump was done negotiating on partially repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

Jimmy Panetta Takes a Hard Line on Military Spending
Son of Defense secretary represents Monterey County

Rep. Jimmy Panetta, left, was sworn in to Congress alongside his father, former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, also a former member of the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When the House approved the $577.9 billion fiscal 2017 defense spending bill on March 8, only 48 members — including four freshmen — voted against it. It’s politically difficult to vote against a measure that pays for the weapons U.S. forces need and supplies the funds for a 2.1 percent pay increase for Americans in uniform.

One of the freshmen was Jimmy Panetta, the youngest of former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta’s three children. He explained that he opposed the bill because it did not spend enough. “It could have done more to help my area on the central coast of California,” Panetta says.

Rep. LoBiondo: Stop Calling My Office Over Health Care Bill
N.J. Republican says his mind is made up, constituents can’t get through for services

Rep. Frank LoBiondo, R-N.J., is asking people to stop calling his office hourly about health care legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Frank LoBiondo is asking people to stop calling his office hourly to convince him to vote for the Republican plan to replace the 2010 health care law.

Lawmakers have reported huge increases of calls to their offices — many from outside their districts — both in D.C. and in their districts over the health carebill. And number of Republican members have seen protests in front of their district offices.

Announcing Keystone, Trump Declares ‘New Era of American Energy Policy’
President tells TransCanada boss his lobbyists did not do ‘a damn thing’ to get his OK

Pipes like these will be used to build the Keystone Pipeline in the United States, which President Trump formally approved on Friday. (Courtesy shannonpatrick17/Wikimedia Commons CC BY 2.0)

President Donald Trump announced Friday he has formally approved a Canadian firm’s application to construct the Keystone XL pipeline, a project long blocked by his predecessor and demanded by Republican lawmakers.

“It’s a great day for American jobs, a historic day for North America and energy independence,” Trump said at his desk in the Oval Office. “This announcement is part of a new era of American energy policy that will lower costs for American families, and very significantly reduce our dependence on foreign oil.”

House GOP Passes Closed Rule for Health Care Bill

UNITED STATES — MARCH 23: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., returns to his office from the House floor in the Capitol on Thursday, March 23, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Continuing a weeks-long process of decisions regarding legislation to partially repeal the 2010 health care law that fly in the face of their repeated calls for “regular order,” House Republicans passed a same-day, closed rule to govern debate on the legislation. 

The 230-194 passage of the rule vote in no way indicates that the legislation itself will pass when the House votes on the bill later Friday. It simply means that opponents of the bill aren’t frustrated enough with the process to vote down the rule.

The Latest on Republican Health Care Bill Vote
With Republicans unable to coral enough votes, the bill was pulled Friday afternoon

Rep. Hal Rogers, R-Ky., center, and other members and staff make their way to a procedural vote in the Capitol before the vote on the American Health Care Act later in the day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans on Friday backed off on their attempt to push through a plan to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, a major blow to one of Donald Trump's biggest campaign promises.

The announcement that GOP leaders would pull the vote on their alternative to the 2010 Affordable health care act came after a frenzied two days of lobbying.

Former Rep. Owens Recalls Pressure Over Obamacare Vote
Obama tried making the final sell, left strong-arming to others

Former Rep. Bill Owens, D-N.Y., recalled the pressure he faced on his 2010 health care vote. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)