2016

Corrine Brown Defense Blames Chief of Staff
Former aide who accepted plea deal is focus as ex-lawmaker’s corruption trial begins

Former Rep. Corrine Brown and her attorney James Wesley Smith III, center, leave court in Jacksonville, Fla., after a pretrial hearing on April 5. (Bob Self/Florida Times-Union via AP)

Former Rep. Corrine Brown’s corruption trial opened on Wednesday in Jacksonville, Florida, with Brown’s defense placing the blame on her former chief of staff. 

The Florida Democrat is charged with 22 counts in a 24-count indictment that includes using her reputation to solicit donations to a charity that she and her former chief of staff used as a slush fund, according to First Coast News.

Senate Republicans Became More Bipartisan in the Last Congress — Democrats, Not So Much
Report places Sen. Bernie Sanders as the least bipartisan senator

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, talk before a committee hearing. Collins was identified in a report as the most bipartisan senator of the 114th Congress. The report ranked Warren 88th. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats, once happy to rail against what they called obstructionist Republicans in the chamber, flipped positions with their friends across the aisle when it came to partisanship in the 114th Congress.

A new report from the Lugar Center and Georgetown University shows that most senators — almost two-thirds of the chamber — acted more bipartisan when it came to cosponsorships on bills during the most recent Congress, compared to the Congress before.

Coffman Gets Second Democratic Challenger
Aurora attorney said incumbent’s support of health care repeal motivated him

Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., received a second Democratic challenger. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In Wisconsin, Trump Returns to ‘America First’ Message
Schumer slams Trump for ‘empty’ actions on jobs, trade

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to try to bring jobs back to American workers and revamp the H-1B visa guest worker program during a visit to the headquarters of tool manufacturer Snap-On on April 18, 2017 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump returned to his nationalist “America first” message on Tuesday after spending most of the previous 12 days focused on Syria and North Korea.

Trump, until he began speaking at a Snap-On Tools factory in Wisconsin, had appeared in recent days to be drifting a bit from the populist message that helped him win manufacturing states like the one he visited Tuesday, as well as Michigan, Ohio and others. But after touring the plant, he was back at it, hailing “American workers” and threatening countries that “steal” their jobs.

King: Trump’s Base Getting ‘Uneasy’ Over Immigration
Iowa conservative says voters worried there hasn’t been action on Obama deferments

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, said President Donald Trump could lose support if he doesn't take action on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Iowa conservative firebrand Rep. Steve King said much of President Donald Trump’s base is getting “uneasy” about his inaction on immigration.

Speaking on Radio Iowa, King criticized Trump for picking “pro-immigration” economist Gary Cohn as an adviser.

Classified Information Complicates Nunes Ethics Probe
Results of investigation may not be revealed at all

House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes is currently the subject of an inquiry by the House Ethics Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The outcome of an ethics investigation surrounding House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes’ disclosure of classified information might never see the light of day, depending on how it’s handled.

The results of that inquiry by the House Ethics Committee may not be revealed for months — or at all — because it centers around disclosure of classified information, ethics experts say.

RNC, White House Try to Avoid Obama’s Missteps
GOP operative: ‘Is the president even interested in party building?’

Republican National Committee officials say they are working closely with the White House on strategy and messaging. But some GOP operatives contend coordination is lacking and that could weaken the party.

Democrats Want Trump to Back up Message on China
As Trump-Xi summit set to begin, Senate Democrats lay down markers

The flags of the United States and China in Washington in 2014. The flags will be on display at President Trump’s Florida golf resort Thursday and Friday as he hosts his Chinese counterpart. (Wikiemedia Commons)

President Donald Trump faces his first true foreign policy challenge when he hosts his Chinese counterpart during a two-day summit, testing whether he can back up his tough talk about Xi Jinping and the Asian power.

Senior Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., are pressing Trump to let Xi know he intends to live up to his bold campaign promises. The Senate Democratic leader on Wednesday pointedly said Trump merely “talks a good game” -- so far — on all matters China.

Ros-Lehtinen Challenger Hopes to Ride Anti-Trump Wave Into House
Scott Fuhrman lost to incumbent by 10 points in 2016

Scott Fuhrman lost to Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., in 2016. He plans on running against her again in 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrat Scott Fuhrman, who challenged Florida Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen last year, plans to face her in a rematch in 2018.

Fuhrman, who lost by 10 points, told the Miami Herald that he expects to ride a wave of anger toward President Donald Trump.

Trump Questions Russia Lobbying By Clinton Campaign Chief’s Brother
Podesta Group calls conservative site's story 'fake news' and 'an attempt to distract'

Tony Podesta is a co-founder of the Podesta Group, a lobbying firm, and the brother of John Podesta, Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign chief. President Trump is raising questions about his reported work for the Russian government. (Wikimedia Commons)

Updated at 10:57 a.m. | Donald Trump is raising questions about whether Tony Podesta, the brother of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign chief, received “big money” to push for the termination of Russian sanctions. But the lobbying firm he co-founded with brother John denies even doing such work for Moscow.

A Monday morning tweet from the president appeared to react to a Daily Caller report that Podesta was paid $170,000 over six months in 2016 to lobby in Washington on behalf of Sberbank. He is brother of John Podesta and the financial institution is Russia’s largest bank.