barack-obama

Franks Blames Democrats for North Korea Nuclear Threat
Congressman says ‘there won’t be enough left of their country for a dog to find if they do attack us’

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., said President Donald Trump’s threat of “fire and fury” will deter North Korea. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks of Arizona blamed former Democratic presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama for nuclear threats from North Korea.

Speaking on the KTAR News show “Mac & Gaydos,” Franks said that President Donald Trump’s remarks that North Korea will be met with “fire and fury” was a sign of change from Democratic presidents.

Gillibrand Leads Democrats in Opposing Trump’s Nominees
Parties largely split along partisan lines on president’s pics

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, seen here with Gen. James Mattis in January prior to his confirmation as Defense secretary, has recorded the most votes opposing President Donald Trump’s nominees so far. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the last day before the August recess, the Senate confirmed 65 of President Donald Trump’s nominees with a single bipartisan voice vote.

That has been a marked difference from the way Democratic senators have approached Trump’s picks for his team. 

Obama Alumni Jump Into Congressional Races Across the Country
Many motivated by Trump’s election and desire to move ex-boss’ policies forward

Democrat Sam Jammal is challenging California Rep. Ed Royce in the 39th District. (Sam Jammal for Congress Facebook page)

Alumni of the Obama administration are heeding their former boss’ call to get in the game themselves and run for office in response the election of President Donald Trump and to continue what the former president started.

Sam Jammal, an Obama appointee in the Commerce Department who is running in California’s 39th District against Republican Rep. Ed Royce, said he was heeding those words.

White House Aide Was Against Immigration Policy Before He Was for It
Stephen Miller’s brawl with CNN, New York Times frames rough press briefing

White House senior adviser Stephen Miller called a CNN reporter “ignorant” and “foolish.” (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP File Photo)

Senior White House policy adviser Stephen Miller clashed sharply with reporters over an immigration overhaul bill President Donald Trump endorsed Wednesday — but Miller was now advocating an immigration policy that he disparaged just a few short years ago when he was a senior Capitol Hill aide. 

During a heated exchanged that featured raised voices and name-calling, the senior White House official referred to veteran CNN reporter Jim Acosta as “ignorant” and “foolish.” Miller also referred to Acosta’s line of questioning about the bill, which would overhaul U.S. green card policies, as “outrageous.”

White House Pushes ‘Implode’ Plan Amid Talk of Bipartisan Health Bill
WH official: Trump’s tweet endorsing deal after Obamacare failure is preferred path

President Donald Trump waves from the top of the stairs before boarding Air Force One Friday on his way to  Ronkonkoma, N.Y. to speak to law enforcement officers. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And NIELS LESNIEWSKIUpdated at 4:47 p.m. Amid pleas from Republicans and Democrats for the parties to begin work on a bipartisan health care bill, President Donald Trump and White House officials on Friday doubled down on his call to put off any action until Barack Obama’s 2010 law fails.

Ailing Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain shocked senators from both parties early Friday morning when he voted against a GOP leadership-crafted measure that amounted only to a partial repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Back in Washington after a brain tumor diagnosis, McCain made clear his vote was a shove for the entire Senate to get back to “regular order” — meaning hearings and floor debate — on health care and every other issue.

Analysis: At Trump Rally, It Was 2016 Again
President mixes fear with bold promises, big boasts before friendly crowd

President Donald Trump speaks during the annual Days of Remembrance Holocaust ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda on April 25, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump, echoing his populist 2016 campaign, mixed the politics of fear and bold promises as he returned to the campaign trail Tuesday evening in Ohio.

As he delivered parts of his remarks in Youngstown, it well could have been July 2016 with then-Republican nominee Trump at the podium. The world is more unsafe than ever. The United States has been run for too long by “stupid” politicians. People who wish to Americans harm are pouring over the southern border. Other countries are taking advantage of U.S. workers and consumers.

Trump Sees Power in Twitter — but Not to Sell Health Care Bill
Since House bill passage, under 10 percent of president’s tweets about health care

As Senate Republicans have struggled to put together their health care legislation, some in the GOP have hoped the president would provide some air coverage through his social media accounts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump unleashed a Twitter barrage in recent days, reflective of a larger trend that is rankling some Republicans: He has fired off notably more tweets about Russia than ones intended to help sell a Senate Republican health care bill.

Trump is quick to defend his Twitter habit as his best tool to directly reach the American people. Yet, since Senate Republicans grabbed the health care baton in early May, the president has devoted less than 10 percent of his tweets to the measure that is unpopular with the public.

Trump Lashes Out at Republicans, Saying They Won’t ‘Protect’ Him
President denounces disloyalty of those he ‘carried’ in last year’s election

President Donald Trump, shown here meeting with Republican senators at the White House on June 27, lambasted unnamed Republican members on Sunday for failing to "protect" him even though they rode his coattails to re-election. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump angrily lashed out at unnamed Republican lawmakers on Sunday, saying they should “protect” him as repayment for his 2016 election coattails.

“It's very sad that Republicans, even some that were carried over the line on my back, do very little to protect their President,” Trump tweeted at 4:14 p.m., EDT. That was just over an hour after he arrived back at the White House after spending around four hours at Trump National Golf Club in nearby Sterling, Virginia.

Amid Trump’s Shifting Health Care Stances, a Recurring Infatuation
President keeps bringing up letting 2010 law fail

President Donald Trump have often said Democratic leaders like Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., will eventually come to him to make a deal on health care. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday again appeared to change his stance on just which path he wants Republican senators to take on health care. But he has long been infatuated with the notion of House and Senate Democratic leaders asking — begging, even — for his help on health care.

This week, the president and his aides have been posturing to put that very scenario in play, even as his own party attempts to resurrect a measure that would repeal most of and partially replace the 2010 health care law in one swoop.

The GOP Full-Court, Post-Lunch Press on Health Care
After White House lunch, an effort to turn nays into ayes

Sen. Tim Scott and other Republican senators went to the White House for lunch on Wednesday to discuss their health care efforts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By John T. Bennett and Joe Williams

Senate Republicans are planning a last-ditch effort to revive their legislation to overhaul the U.S. insurance system after a lunch-time meeting on Wednesday afternoon with President Donald Trump.