capitol-hill-police

Suspicious substance investigated outside of Schiff’s office
Capitol Police cleared the incident just before noon

Capitol Police officers block off a hallway as they investigate a reported suspicious substance in the Rayburn office of Rep. Adam B. Schiff, D-Calif., on Thursday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

A suspicious substance was found outside lead House impeachment manager Adam B. Schiff’s congressional office Thursday morning but was ultimately deemed not hazardous and cleared by the Capitol Police, casting a cloud of grim reality over Schiff’s earlier comments expressing grave concern for his staffers.

The incident comes just a day after President Donald Trump was acquitted by the Senate in his impeachment trial on both charges: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Schiff, a California Democrat, spent days presenting the case for Trump’s removal from office.

Campus Notebook: Sen. Bob Menendez spent over $5 million in legal fees associated with corruption scandal
Capitol Police arrested someone for assault with a broomstick

Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., has depleted and terminated his legal expense trust. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Millions in legal expenses for Sen. Bob Menendez’s corruption scandal

The New Jersey Democrat spent $5.16 million on his defense, according to his legal expense fund filing with the Senate Office of Public Records. The trust was formed in 2014 at the beginning of Menendez’s legal woes. It allows people to make contributions to Menendez so he can fight his legal battles associated with the Senate Select Committee on Ethics inquiries and allegations of federal law violations associated with his role as a senator.

Impeachment trial security crackdown will limit Capitol press access
Press pens and ‘no walking and talking’ draw criticism from press corps advocates

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate Policy luncheons on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate sergeant-at-arms and Capitol Police are launching an unprecedented crackdown on the Capitol press corps for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, following a standoff between the Capitol’s chief security officials, Senate Rules Chairman Roy Blunt and the standing committees of correspondents.

Capitol Police Chief Steven A. Sund and Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael C. Stenger will enact a plan that intends to protect senators and the chamber, but it also suggests that credentialed reporters and photographers whom senators interact with on a daily basis are considered a threat.

Lawmaker pay freeze continues under proposed 2020 spending bill
Legislative Branch measure boosts money for member security, conventions, inauguration

Capitol Police would get a boost in funding for additional security for Congress under a year-end spending package that would avert a partial government shutdown. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats who wanted to approve a raise for lawmakers for the first time since 2009 will have to wait until the next appropriations cycle to deliver, as the final fiscal 2020 Legislative Branch spending draft, released Monday, keeps salaries stagnant. 

The Legislative Branch section of an eight-bill package, one of two sets of appropriations bills to fund the government through next September, provides $5.1 billion in total discretionary funding for congressional operations. That would be up from $4.8 billion in fiscal 2019 funding. 

Staffers gripe about lack of communication during Capitol lockdown
House sergeant-at-arms acknowledges missteps regarding suspicious aircraft incident

Staffers are criticizing the lack of response from the Capitol Police amid Tuesday’s lockdown (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After reports of a possible aircraft in restricted airspace over Washington on Tuesday, U.S. Capitol Police halted access to Capitol grounds. But a lack of communication left staffers confused and in the dark.

Although the lockdown lasted nearly 50 minutes and was “cleared without incident,” according to a Capitol Police statement, several staffers relied on social media and word of mouth for information.

Campus Notebook: No Daily Show for you! Thursday Night Football OK, though
What trip to Florida is complete without a stop at Slim’s Fish Camp

People form a long line as they wait to enter The Daily Show with Trevor Noah’s The Donald J. Trump Presidential Twitter Library attraction in Washington on Friday June 14, 2019. The Daily Show was initially on the schedule for a Senate staffer's trip to New York, but the Ethics Committee advised against it. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Campus Notebook this week highlights Senate staffers who took trips to New York City in search of more knowledge about music and television production. Also, a Capitol Police drug arrest.

Kyle Hill, a legislative correspondent for Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott, traveled to New York City, from Oct. 3-4, on a $793 trip paid for by The Internet & Television Association.

Capitol Hill comes together for police officer’s 11-year-old daughter after cancer diagnosis
Ella, daughter of Capitol Police officer Bret Sorrell, has been diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

From left, Tate, Ella and Bret Sorrell. (Photo courtesy of the Sorrell family)

Halloween is a time for siblings to engage in war after a night of trick-or-treating. Battles ensue over who got the most candy. On a good night, a civilized “trade” might take place.

But this year, 11-year-old Ella and her 8-year-old brother Tate were on the same team. While Ella spent her night at Children’s National Hospital, Tate was out doing “double duty” trick-or-treating and making sure his older sister didn’t miss out.

Fired Capitol Police officer loses sex discrimination lawsuit
Jury finds gender was a factor, but not the only one, and rejects compensatory damages

Former U.S. Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine, right, and former Chief Matthew Verderosa testified in the gender discrimination trial. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Fired Capitol Police officer Chrisavgi Sourgoutsis’ gender was a motivating factor in her dismissal, but the force still would have terminated her, a federal jury found in rejecting her sexual discrimination lawsuit.

Tuesday’s verdict means Sourgoutsis failed to prove she would have remained on the force, but for her sex. The jury denied her bid for compensatory damages, and found she did not prove she was fired for testifying in a sexual harassment investigation into her supervisor.

Man who threatened to shoot Ilhan Omar pleads guilty
Patrick Carlineo Jr., of Addison, N.Y., faces 10 years in prison and $250,000 fine

The man who threatened to shoot Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., pleaded guilty on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A New York man who threatened in March to shoot Rep. Ilhan Omar in the head pleaded guilty in federal court for threatening to assault and murder a U.S. official and being a felon in possession of firearms.

Patrick Carlineo Jr., of Addison, New York, faces a maximum of 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine or both. Carlineo entered his plea Monday in U.S. District Court in the Western District of New York in Rochester.

Capitol Police sexual discrimination trial in the hands of jury
Department admits it ‘messed up’ procedure, but defends firing former officer

Former Chief Matthew Verderosa said at trial last week that the department had a systemic failure when it came to completing quarterly reports for new officers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Summing up his client’s argument she was fired by the Capitol Police when a superior officer found out she talked to internal investigators about alleged sexual harassment, attorney R. Scott Oswald left the jury with a question Thursday.

Why would her assistant chief tell Chrisavgi Sourgoutsis to put disciplinary matters in the past, and that she could get back vacation time that had been frozen if she did, when the department was planning to fire her?