civil-rights

Women share pride in Eleanor Holmes Norton dedication at Georgetown Law
Friends and supporters laud D.C. delegate’s role in ‘civil rights and women’s rights and D.C. rights’

Breaking ground on the Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green and monument at Georgetown Law Center are, from left, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser; Georgetown Law Center Dean William Treanor; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C.; Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.; and Georgetown President John DeGioia. (Clyde McGrady/CQ Roll Call)

The Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green at Georgetown University Law Center is a point of pride for the women in attendance for its groundbreaking Tuesday.

Surrounded by her children, grandchildren, colleagues and friends among the 150 supporters beneath a white reception tent on the law center’s green, Norton, 81, basked in the honor and recounted the civil rights and feminist battles fought during her time in and out of office.

Supreme Court to decide whether LGBTQ people are covered by Civil Rights Act
It's the first time the Supreme Court will decide a major LGBTQ rights case since the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh

Sam Brinton, Head of Advocacy and Government Affairs at The Trevor Project, a confidential suicide hotline for LGBTQ youth, said his group was receiving calls related to the decision on the Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission which ruled in favor of Colorado baker Jack Phillips Monday, June 4, 2018. Next term, the court will take on a trio of cases about employment discrimination based on “sex,” deciding whether LGBTQ people are protected by the Civil Rights Act. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will decide next term whether federal law protects LGBT individuals from workplace discrimination, a major case on the politically divisive social and religious issue that will play out against the backdrop of the 2020 presidential election.

The justices announced Monday they will consider a trio of cases about prohibiting employment discrimination based on “sex” in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and whether it also covers sexual orientation and transgender persons.

Johnny Cash is replacing one of the Capitol’s Civil War statues
The country music legend and civil rights leader Daisy Gatson Bates will replace controversial Civil War figures

A statue of Uriah Milton Rose of Arkansas is seen in the Capitol's Statuary Hall on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The times are changing, and so is the marble. Arkansas is leaving behind statues of the old guard and sending a few new faces to the U.S. Capitol.

Civil rights icon Daisy Gatson Bates and musician Johnny Cash will join the Statuary Hall collection in D.C., replacing 19th-century attorney Uriah Milton Rose and statesman James Paul Clarke. The governor of Arkansas, Asa Hutchinson, made the plan official by signing a bill last week. 

The Senate lacks protections for LGBTQ staff. One group is demanding change
Existing laws for legislative branch workers don’t explicitly protect LGBTQ employees

A Senate staffer group is urging offices to adopt policy manuals that include protections for LGBTQ employees from discrimination. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Congress considers expanding civil rights to encompass LGBTQ Americans, Senate staffers want their bosses to shore up such protections for the congressional workforce itself. 

In a letter sent April 8, the bipartisan Senate GLASS Caucus urged chamber offices to adopt policy manuals that include protections for LGBTQ employees from discrimination.

Democrats and Republicans embrace MLK’s once-controversial diatribe against ‘moderation’
Doug Jones leads bipartisan group in reading ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail’

Alabama Democratic Sen. Doug Jones  arrives in the Capitol for a vote on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A bipartisan group of senators led by Alabama Democrat Doug Jones on Tuesday took to the Senate floor to read Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” commemorating the anniversary of the slain civil rights legend’s famous jeremiad, and showing just how far public opinion has shifted on the once-controversial civil rights icon.

King’s letter, written in April 1963 from his jail cell, is not a tirade against the guardians of segregation.

Rep. Jackie Speier urges Kim Kardashian to tweet at Trump about Armenian genocide
Most U.S. presidents have stopped short of acknowledging the systematic killing of Armenians

Kim Kardashian, in black, enters the White House grounds in May 2018 to meet with members of the Trump administration. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

Rep. Jackie Speier said the push for President Donald Trump to condemn the Armenian genocide has a “secret weapon” — his fellow television reality star Kim Kardashian.

“I think within our diaspora we have a secret weapon to get him to recognize the Armenian genocide,” Speier said Tuesday. “I think we all need to tweet to Kim Kardashian and ask her,” prompting some laughter from the crowd.

Elizabeth Warren: Eliminate Senate filibusters if a future GOP minority stops the Democratic agenda
2020 presidential hopeful says Mitch McConnell should not be allowed to block legislation

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., center, listens to President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address in February, seated behind, from left,  Supreme Court Justices Elena Kagan, Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh. (Doug Mills/The New York Times/pool file photo)

Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren is ready to say that if a future Republican Senate minority were to try to thwart her agenda, it will be time to get rid of the filibuster.

“I’m not running for president just to talk about making real, structural change. I’m serious about getting it done. And part of getting it done means waking up to the reality of the United States Senate,” the Massachusetts Democratic senator is expected to say Friday.

House to probe rise in hate crimes since Trump was elected
Looking into rising hate crimes is a priority for House Judiciary Chairman Nadler

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left, and ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., conduct a House Judiciary Committee markup in Rayburn Building on a resolution to authorize the issuance of subpoenas to obtain the full Robert Mueller report on Wednesday, April 3, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Judiciary Committee will look into rising rates of hate crimes and white nationalism in the U.S. at a hearing on Tuesday, April 9.

After the midterm elections last year, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the chairman of the committee who was then the ranking member, promised to hold hearings in the new Congress on the rise of racially and religiously motivated violence.

Sen. Chris Murphy calls college athlete compensation a ‘civil rights issue’
UConn fan released first in a series of reports on the college sports industry

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., calls inequity in college sports a “civil rights issue.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Basketball fans across the country are stressing over their March Madness brackets for the NCAA tournament, but Connecticut Democrat Sen. Christopher S. Murphy is instead stressing the staggering inequity in college sports that he calls “a civil rights issue.”

Murphy released a report Thursday morning, titled Madness, Inc.: How is everyone getting rich off college sports — except the players, which is the first in a series he plans to put out on the state of the multi billion-dollar collegiate athletics industry. He plans to dig into how advertisers, executives, coaches, and college administrators reap the benefits from college sports, while the athletes who are competing receive no monetary compensation.

Chicago mayor candidate has ‘alliance with the devil,’ Rep. Bobby Rush says
Chicago Democrat and longtime civil rights activist accused fellow Democrat Lori Lightfoot of protecting rogue police officers

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., flanked by then-House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, speaks about his family's experience with gun violence in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Bobby Rush has vociferously denounced one of the two candidates in a runoff election for Chicago mayor as the pro-police option who has not done enough to curb police brutality in the city.

Rush, a civil rights leader and longtime Chicago Democrat in the U.S. House, reignited the conversation surrounding police brutality over the weekend when he accused Democrat Lori Lightfoot, one of the two candidates to emerge for the run-off, of protecting rogue police officers who use excessive force.