civil-rights

Trump on Course for Least Diverse Judicial Picks Since Reagan
President’s nominees have been overwhelmingly white and male

Greg Katsas was nominated by President Donald Trump for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He is seen here during his confirmation hearing last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s picks for federal judgeships reflect a strikingly different direction when it comes to diversity on the bench — it is the most white and male group of nominees in recent history.

So far, 91 percent of Trump’s 58 judicial nominees for district and appeals courts are white, a pace that would make his appointees the least diverse since the Reagan administration, according to statistics compiled by the liberal advocacy group Alliance for Justice. Only 19 percent of his picks are women, a pace that would make his appointees the most male since the George H.W. Bush administration.

Opinion: Did Everyone in the White House Take a Nap During History Class?
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly wrong to repeat “Lost Cause” mythology

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly was on the wrong side of the facts when he repeated the Confederate “Lost Cause” mythology, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In forward-looking America, history is sometimes regarded as a roadblock to progress, a nuisance. And that, as has been repeatedly proven, is a mistake.

Why look back when the future is so important? Well, because failure to do exactly that has consequences.

Senators Ready to Confront Sessions at Oversight Hearing
Attorney General likely to face contentious questions about his leadership

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions returns to face his former Senate Judiciary Committee colleagues Wednesday in an oversight hearing likely to include contentious questions about Justice Department actions since he took on the role eight months ago.

“The attorney general will earn his money that day,” said committee member John Kennedy, a Louisiana Republican.

Ai Weiwei Brings Politics, Humanity to ‘Human Flow’
Movie about refugees gets Republican and Democratic lawmakers to agree on something

Ai Weiwei’s film “Human Flow” traverses the globe to examine the refugee crisis. (Courtesy “Human Flow”)

Politics is seldom far removed from Ai Weiwei’s art, whether it comes in the form of a memorial to his dissident father, an iconic Olympics stadium in Beijing, Lego portraits of political prisoners or, in his latest venture, a documentary about refugees, “Human Flow.”

Aside from the accomplishment of shooting a movie in extremely dangerous locations across the globe about extremely desperate people, the artist has now been able to do that rarest of things for Washington: get a Republican and Democrat in the same room to agree on something.

Lawmakers Join the Battle Over NFL Protests
Some Republicans are boycotting the league, while some Democrats laud it

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, in jacket, and head coach Jason Garrett, right, kneel with their team in a show of solidarity before the national anthem during a game against the Arizona Cardinals on Monday. (James D. Smith via AP)

 

Republican and Democratic lawmakers have joined the battle for patriotic superiority that heated up in NFL stadiums over the weekend.

Pelosi Calls Out Trump for War on NFL, NBA
Sports are ‘where we put our differences aside,’ minority leader says

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said President Donald Trump should have used the controversy surrounding NFL national anthem protests as an opportunity to "bring people together.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As President Donald Trump uninvited the NBA champion Golden State Warriors from their White House visit and called any NFL player who kneels during the national anthem before games a “son of a bitch” over the weekend, Rep. Nancy Pelosi struck a different tone about the interplay between sports and politics.

“I have always said sports and the arts will bring America together,” the House minority leader said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “It’s where we put our differences aside.”

Opinion: The Terror Within — Those Who See Danger in Diversity
Focus should be on bringing America together

White nationalists and neo-Nazis exchange insults with counterprotesters on Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Americans are eager to fight foreign enemies but they often ignore signs of terror from within, Curtis writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images File Photo)

It was a stirring message of unity. On Monday, 16 years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on American soil that saw planes flown into the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, and brave passengers divert one into a Pennsylvania field, President Donald Trump honored the memories of the dead and the heroics woven through the actions of so many.

At a 9/11 commemoration ceremony at the Pentagon, Trump recalled that moment: “On that day, not only did the world change, but we all changed. Our eyes were opened to the depths of the evil we face. But in that hour of darkness, we also came together with renewed purpose. Our differences never looked so small, our common bonds never felt so strong.”

Ryan: DACA Fix Needs to Include Border Security Measures, Trump’s Support
President ‘made the right call,’ speaker says

Immigration rights demonstrators marched from the White House to the Trump International Hotel and the Justice Department to oppose President Donald Trump’s decision to end the DACA program for “dreamers” on Tuesday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Wednesday that a legislative solution to replace an Obama-era program designed to protect children of undocumented immigrants from deportation will need to include border security measures and have the support of President Donald Trump.

The Wisconsin Republican said the dilemma that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which provided work permits and social security numbers for roughly 800,000 young undocumented immigrants, sought to alleviate was a symptom of a larger border security problem.

Analysis: Trump Hits Congress With Immigration Quandary
Administration’s decision on DACA could derail work on other items

Demonstrators march from the White House down Pennsylvania Avenue to the Trump International Hotel and the Justice Department on Tuesday to oppose President Donald Trump's decision to phase out the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Republican legislative agenda for the remainder of the year was thrown into question Tuesday after the Trump administration announced its decision to gradually wind down an Obama-era program affecting undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children.

The White House essentially put Congress on a six-month clock to advance a comprehensive immigration overhaul, an achievement that has so far been unreachable for many years due to the complexity of the issue and vast differences of opinions.

Opinion: Trump Giving Ryan and McConnell the Power on DACA
Why Congress needs to act on immigration

Demonstrators outside the Trump International Hotel on Tuesday. President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind the DACA program could imperil GOP majorities in the House and Senate, Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

If President Donald Trump and the Republican leadership were a married couple, we would refer to August as “The Estrangement.”

After months of bashing House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and “the Republicans” on Twitter, things got so bad between Trump and McConnell last month that they went for weeks without talking. On a phone call just before things got really bad, Trump was reportedly yammering to McConnell when the majority leader fell so silent, the president had to ask, “Are you there, Mitch?”