congressional-staffers

‘We’re not a subpoena production factory’: Nadler moving carefully on obstruction probe
House Judiciary Committee has requested documents from 81 people and entities tied to Trump for it obstruction investigation

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is investigating possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his associates. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Documents requested from key associates of Donald Trump as part of the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation into obstruction of justice and corruption are beginning to trickle in, the top Democrat on the committee indicated Thursday.

About half of the 81 people and entities connected to Trump who received letters and document requests in February from Chairman Jerrold Nadler have been in touch with the New York Democrat’s staff about complying with the committee’s probe.

Jim Jordan seeks to block increased funds for Oversight panel he helps lead
Chairman Elijah Cummings wants to rebuild staffing, but his GOP counterpart does not

Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, right, and ranking member Jim Jordan are the only House committee leaders to disagree about funding levels for their panel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As House Democrats ramp up their oversight investigations into President Donald Trump’s administration, businesses, and 2016 campaign, at least one Republican has found a new battleground to push back: funding for the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

That panel’s chairman, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland, asked the House Administration Committee on Tuesday for a funding increase of 4 percent this year and 10 percent next year over funding levels from the previous, GOP-controlled 115th Congress.

Judiciary chairman, ranking GOP member dispute what Whitaker told them in no-transcript meeting
Nadler, Collins met privately Wednesday with ex-acting attorney general over conversations with Trump about Cohen

Former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker came to Capitol Hill on Wednesday for a private meeting with House Judiciary leaders. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The top Democrat and Republican on the House Judiciary Committee disagreed Wednesday over what exactly former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker told them behind closed doors regarding his conversations with President Donald Trump — and the public may never know for sure what was actually said.

“There’s no transcript [of the meeting], and there will be no transcript,” said a legal counsel for Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, the top Republican on the panel.

Georgia Senate delegation has women in charge again
Megan Whittemore's promotion means both Sens. David Perdue and Johnny Isakson have female chiefs of staff

Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., and his new chief of staff Megan Whittemore, seen here outside the Senate Republican Policy luncheons. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Georgia’s Senate delegation again has two women leading the way at the staff level.

That is the result of Megan Whittemore, who has worked for Sen. David Perdue since he was campaigning for the seat in 2014, being elevated to chief of staff.

Rep. Tlaib announces plans to file impeachment resolution against Trump
The Michigan Democrat aims to introduce the resolution in the coming weeks.

Reps. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., and Andy Levin, D-Mich., are seen outside the Capitol after the last votes of the week in the House on Jan. 11, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Rashida Tlaib announced plans during a news conference Wednesday to file an impeachment resolution against President Donald Trump. 

The Michigan Democrat aims to introduce the resolution in the coming weeks, a staffer told Roll Call. The move will be one of the first official congressional actions concerning impeachment of the president.

Disgraced Rep. Ruben Kihuen tries to alter his sexual harassment record
Nevada Democrat is running for Las Vegas city council after leaving House amid sexual misconduct allegations

Former Rep. Ruben Kihuen, D-Nev., has downplayed allegations of sexual harassment against him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The way former Rep. Ruben Kihuen describes it now, he was run out of Congress for engaging in playful, flirtatious banter with women who worked for him and with him.

But that’s not what the House Ethics Committee found after a monthslong probe into allegations of sexual harassment against him by three women.

From silent to millennial, generations of the Democratic presidential field
The growing primary roster now ranges in age from 37 to 77

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, represent the range of generations making up the 2020 Democratic presidential field. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Say this for the Democrats, they are multigenerational. 

Their presidential field continued to swell as Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, an independent who affiliates with Democrats, announced he was running and promptly raised millions of dollars to show his campaign apparatus was doing just fine. 

Congress tries to walk the climate crisis talk
Amid debate on Green New Deal, Democrats are treading lightly in their daily lives

Staffers are aiming to lead by example, by creating workplace cultures where being “green” is a priority. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Staffers working for environmentally minded lawmakers are trying to walk the talk on climate change by taking small personal actions while their bosses call for big-picture policy shifts.

Around Capitol Hill, several aides are aiming to create workplace cultures where being “green” is a priority and holding colleagues accountable is the norm.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s call for a ‘living wage’ starts in her office
New York Democrat will pay staffers no less than $52,000 a year

New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, center, and Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, third from right, arrive with staff members for a press conference on the Green New Deal outside the Capitol on Feb. 7. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Claudia Pagon Marchena, like so many Hill staffers, moonlighted at a Washington, D.C., eatery to pay her rent until she took a job with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. She celebrated her last day at her coffee shop job that same week.

That’s because Ocasio-Cortez, who has called on fellow lawmakers to pay their staffs a “living wage,” is making an example out of her own office. The New York Democrat has introduced an unusual policy that no one on her staff will make less than $52,000 a year — an almost unheard of amount for many of the 20-somethings whose long hours make House and Senate offices run.

Lori Trahan got the band back together as she staffed up her office
Freshman Democrat was once a Hill aide herself

When Rep. Lori Trahan was a scheduler, she tried to be the first one at the office, if only for a little quiet time. Now that she’s the boss, she doesn’t want her staffers to burn the candle at both ends. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lori Trahan knows a thing or two about transferable skills. After climbing the Hill ranks from scheduler to chief of staff, she decamped to the male-dominated world of tech, where her congressional experience came in handy.

Now that she’s back as a freshman Democrat — in the same seat once held by her former boss, Massachusetts Rep. Marty Meehan — she’s trying to think like a consultant. That means being willing to say, “Wait a second, that’s crazy.”