corporations

Your Ride to the Polls Is Two Minutes Away: Lyft Helps Get Out the Vote
Critics say the company’s gesture is no match for disenfranchisement across the country

Kris Kobach is the Republican nominee for governor in Kansas. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Latino advocacy group announced Monday it will partner with Lyft to drive Kansas voters to the polls, Fortune reported.

The Latino community in Dodge City — a factory town located 160 miles from Wichita — worried about depressed turnout when local officials announced weeks before Election Day that its only polling place would move outside city limits to a remote location more than a mile away from the nearest bus stop.

Trump Largely Focuses on Own Re-Election at Iowa Rally for GOP Incumbents
President wants to find out if Elizabeth Warren really ‘has Indian blood’

President Donald Trump, here in July, was in Iowa on Tuesday night for a campaign rally for two vulnerable House Republicans. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Very much in re-election mode even before next month’s midterms, President Donald Trump took jabs at potential Democratic candidates at an Iowa rally Tuesday night, calling their party “an angry mob.”

“You don’t hand matches to an arsonists. And you don’t hand power to an angry mob,” he told rallygoers in Council Bluffs, Iowa. “If you want to defeat the swamp, you’ll have to elect Republicans.”

In Trade Pact, Trump Sees Trap for Democrats and Warning to China
Kudlow: If Democrats ‘want to help working folks, they’ll go with this deal’

President Donald Trump, with Senate candidate Rep. Marsha Blackburn, at a campaign rally Monday night in Johnson City, Tenn. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

One word stood out this week as President Donald Trump’s top trade negotiator, Robert Lighthizer, described an updated North American trade pact: “progressive.”

Also notable during a half-hour discussion about the agreement Lighthizer held with a group of reporters: He was complimentary of the Obama administration’s Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact with Asian countries from which Trump withdrew. He even admitted the new North American agreement is “built on” many aspects of TPP.

White House Celebrates Trade Pact, Prepares to Sell Congress
Toomey, Heitkamp among members expressing concerns as Trump takes victory lap

Sens. Patrick J. Toomey, R-Pa., and Ron Johnson, R-Wis., at a Senate Budget hearing earlier this year. Toomey expressed some concerns Monday about a new trade pact brokered by the Trump administration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump and his team convinced Canada to join a revised North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico. Now, the hard part begins: Convincing congressional Democrats, who could control one or both chambers next year, to approve it.

Trump and White House officials contend the deal, if approved by Congress, would benefit American dairy farmers and automakers. They have also highlighted new e-commerce and intellectual property protections, as well as a new six-year review mandate. And they say each should appeal to Democrats.

Campaigns, Parties Can Accept Free Service From Microsoft, FEC Says
Watchdogs warn ruling could open loophole for corporations looking to skirt campaign finance laws, influence lawmakers

Democratic National Headquarters in Washington, D.C. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Federal campaigns and national party committees can accept free security services from the Microsoft Corporation after a recent Federal Election Commission ruling.

But one watchdog group called it an unprecedented opening for corporations looking to influence lawmakers and skirt campaign finance laws.

Accountability Groups Back Boards Ban for Lawmakers
Chris Collins indictment on securities fraud provides some impetus

Interest groups are backing a ban, sponsored by Reps. Kathleen Rice (pictured here) and Tom Reed, on House members serving on the boards of publicly held companies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Government accountability groups are backing a resolution, to prohibit members of Congress from serving on the boards of publicly held companies.

Thirteen groups sent a letter this week to House lawmakers in support of a resolution introduced in August by GOP Rep. Tom Reed and Democratic Rep. Kathleen Rice.

Donald Trump Googled Himself and Didn’t Like What He Saw
Tech firms have ‘RIGGED’ search results against him, president alleges

President Donald Trump lashed out at technology firms, singling out Google for what he says is biased search results intended to hurt him. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump went after technology firms Tuesday morning, singling out Google by alleging its search settings are biased against him.

He used a pair of morning tweets to, as he often does, paint himself and fellow conservatives as the victims of a liberal conspiracy. In this incarnation of what is a running Trump narrative, he used this search topic to make his point: “Trump News.”

How Joe Barton Struck Out
Retiring Texas Republican was thwarted by his own political instincts

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, faces retirement after a sex scandal. His career in Washington had already reached its peak. (CQ Roll Call)

Leadership be damned, Rep. Joe L. Barton thought. He knew he was right, and as soon as he was convinced of that, hardly anything in the world could move him.

Just a few months into his first term, the Texas Republican was angling for something between protest and revolution. House Democrats had voted to declare themselves the winner of a contested Indiana House race — in Republicans’ eyes, a theft. While his own party’s leadership urged restraint, Barton fumed.

Bipartisan Duo Proposes Prohibiting House Members From Serving on Public Company Boards
Resolution to amend House rules comes in wake of Chris Collins insider trading

Reps. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., pictured, and Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., are proposing a change in House rules to prohibit members from serving on boards of publicly-traded companies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan New York duo is proposing a change in House rules that would prohibit members from serving on serving on the boards of publicly held companies, the latest fallout from the indictment of Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., for insider trading. 

Collins served on the board of Innate Immunotherapeutics, an Australian biotechnology company, and allegedly shared inside knowledge about Innate’s drug trial results with his son, who then made timely stock trades. 

Trump’s Threat to Leave the WTO Alarms Many, Even in Congress
And it might be a tipping point for Republicans on the Hill

President Donald Trump, here at the Capitol in June, says World Trade Organization members are not playing fair with America. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The United States once viewed the World Trade Organization as the wave of the future, an improvement over the aging General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade system and a hub of rules-based stability for countries — rich and poor, democratic and nondemocratic — engaged in the international buying and selling of goods and services.

Now President Donald Trump is eyeing the exit door from the WTO, a Geneva-based body the U.S. helped to create in 1995 to negotiate trade standards among its 164-member nations and to referee disputes among them using a playbook of agreed upon rules.