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Bipartisan Duo Proposes Prohibiting House Members From Serving on Public Company Boards
Resolution to amend House rules comes in wake of Chris Collins insider trading

Reps. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., pictured, and Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., are proposing a change in House rules to prohibit members from serving on boards of publicly-traded companies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan New York duo is proposing a change in House rules that would prohibit members from serving on serving on the boards of publicly held companies, the latest fallout from the indictment of Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., for insider trading. 

Collins served on the board of Innate Immunotherapeutics, an Australian biotechnology company, and allegedly shared inside knowledge about Innate’s drug trial results with his son, who then made timely stock trades. 

Trump’s Threat to Leave the WTO Alarms Many, Even in Congress
And it might be a tipping point for Republicans on the Hill

President Donald Trump, here at the Capitol in June, says World Trade Organization members are not playing fair with America. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The United States once viewed the World Trade Organization as the wave of the future, an improvement over the aging General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade system and a hub of rules-based stability for countries — rich and poor, democratic and nondemocratic — engaged in the international buying and selling of goods and services.

Now President Donald Trump is eyeing the exit door from the WTO, a Geneva-based body the U.S. helped to create in 1995 to negotiate trade standards among its 164-member nations and to referee disputes among them using a playbook of agreed upon rules.

Wilbur Ross Calls Out Firms for Using Tariffs as ‘Excuse’ for Firings
Commerce secretary: EU trade talks will be fast-tracked

Farmland in the desert near Palmdale, Calif. Farm-state lawmakers are concerned the Trump administration’s sanctions will hurt their farmers. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross criticized companies that have fired workers because of those tariffs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross called out U.S. companies that blame President Donald Trump’s tariffs after laying off employees, saying they are using the White House’s trade policies as an “excuse.”

“Look at the actual statistics. A lot more jobs are being created,” Ross told pool reporters Thursday on Air Force One. He said the Trump administration’s employment data “do not show that employment is being hurt,” predicting “very good numbers for the June period.”

Appropriations, Trade Policy Keep K Street Swamped
Facebook among companies posting record tabs on federal lobbying

The political and policy uncertainty of the Trump era has continued to fuel business on K Street. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Work on appropriations bills and consternation over new tariffs helped keep K Street in business this year, as the midterm elections begin to cast a shadow over the Capitol.

Some of the biggest spenders on federal lobbying reported a slight dip in what they shelled out during the year’s second quarter versus what they posted during the first quarter. And some multi-client lobbying firms posted flat, or fewer, fees.

Tariffs Not Enough to Outsmart China, Experts Tell Lawmakers
Two House Foreign Affairs subcommittees held hearing Wednesday

The Senate-passed defense authorization bill includes a seven-year ban on sales of U.S-made parts to ZTE Corp., a Chinese telecommunications company. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

The United States will have to use more than trade tariffs to force China to curb policies designed to give its state-owned enterprises a competitive edge over U.S. companies and undermine America’s technological future, experts on China told two House Foreign Affairs subcommittees on Wednesday.

The witnesses, at a hearing on Chinese trade practices, recommended strategies including using a new Justice Department anti-trust enforcement division that scrutinizes violations by foreign governments. They also said the United States should band together with trading partners to increase pressure on China to change discriminatory policies on intellectual property. In addition, the witnesses favored action on legislation in a House-Senate conference committee that would expand national security reviews of Chinese business transactions involving high-tech.

Opinion: The Numbers Tell the Story — Tax Cuts Work
Recent economic data run counter to the media and Democrats‘ narrative

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, here with Republican lawmakers unveiling the GOP tax plan last September, says Americans have gone from asking “Where are the jobs?” to asking “Where are more workers?” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last October, not long before passage of the Republican tax cuts, Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press” argued over taxes with his guest, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin.

“There has been no study that has been able to somehow reinforce this idea that tax cuts do translate to economic growth,” the NBC host said.

Trump Heads to G-7 Isolated by Tariffs, Estranged From Allies
‘There is a growing frustration,’ Ways and Means Chairman Brady says

One analyst says this weekend’s G7 summit will be more like a “G6+1,” with President Donald Trump isolated from other leaders, angry over his steel and aluminum tariffs. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump will arrive Friday at a G-7 meeting in Canada, with no specific goals for the summit and under fire from Republican lawmakers and the very world leaders with whom he will spend the weekend.

The U.S. leader’s steel and aluminum tariffs have upset other heads of state and caused many to retaliate with their own proposed fees on U.S. goods such as bourbon and cheese. Among the agitated leaders are those from G-7 countries such as Canada and the United Kingdom. But before the president hears new pleas from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and British Prime Minister Theresa May to drop the tariffs, he is getting an earful from members of his own party.

Trump Demands Canada Take Down ‘Trade Barriers’
‘This is not a trade war. It’s a trade discussion,’ says White House economic adviser Kudlow

President Donald Trump said “The United States has been taken advantage of for many decades on trade. Those days are over.” (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Updated 10:54 a.m. | President Donald Trump on Friday demanded Canada “open their markets and take down their trade barriers!” as he threatened more tariffs against America’s northern neighbor.

Trump alleged in a tweet that Canada has “treated our Agricultural business and Farmers very poorly for a very long period of time,” calling the Canadian government “Highly restrictive on Trade!”

Lawmakers Concerned About Trump’s Pledge to Save China’s ZTE
Schumer claims U.S. president’s help would ‘make China great again’

A ZTE-made mobile device. Trump says he will help the Chinese firm avoid collapse. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Members from both parties reacted skeptically Monday to President Donald Trump’s intention to help troubled Chinese telecommunications company ZTE, saying they were concerned he was reversing his pledge to get tough on Beijing.

Trump campaigned, in part, on altering the United States’ trading relationships with the rest of the world, taking a particularly hard line against China and its practices. In 2011, he went so far as to say “China is raping this country.” So a Sunday tweet by the president raised eyebrows when he announced an effort with Chinese President Xi Jinping to “give massive Chinese phone company, ZTE, a way to get back into business, fast.”

CQ Top Editor Steve Komarow Dies
Reporting ranged from the White House to the Khyber Pass

Steve Komarow, CQ Roll Call’s senior vice president and executive editor (CQ/Roll Call file photo) (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Steve Komarow, a veteran foreign correspondent and newsroom leader who served as senior vice president and executive editor at CQ Roll Call, died Sunday after a recent accident and long illness. He was 61.

“Steve and I joined CQ Roll Call in January 2015 and from the outset his intellect and encyclopedic knowledge of Washington was an enormous asset to our coverage and the development of new products,” said Paul McHale, CQ Roll Call’s president. “But that intellect never got in the way of what I will remember most about Steve, his humanity.”