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List to replace fired national security adviser John Bolton grows to 15
Trump says he makes ‘all the decisions’ so senior advisers ‘don’t have to work’

President Donald Trump walks from the South Lawn to Marine One on his way to Joint Base Andrews in July 2018. He took the executive helicopter to a GOP retreat in Baltimore on Thursday evening. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There are now 15 candidates to replace John Bolton as President Donald Trump’s national security adviser, but the president says it will not be Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

There was talk around Washington that the former Kansas GOP congressman — rumored to be eyeing a Senate run in his home state next year — might do both jobs after increasingly becoming Trump’s go-to counselor on foreign affairs and national security. But the president put an end to such speculation Thursday evening.

Five candidates on list to replace ‘Mr. Tough Guy’ John Bolton, Trump says
President mocks former national security adviser day after he was fired or quit, depending on the source

President Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as he departs the Capitol in "The Beast" in March. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump said Wednesday he is looking closely at five candidates to replace hawkish John Bolton — whom he mocked — a day after he abruptly fired Bolton from his role as national security adviser.

“We have a lot of good people who want that position. … We’ll have five people who want it very much,” Trump told reporters after an unrelated event at the White House. “We’ll be announcing somebody next week.”

With Congress back, Trump tells staff he doesn’t want another shutdown
Hill envoy details to-do list, which could face obstacles, including from White House

President Donald Trump has told his staff to avoid a government shutdown, but several obstacles remain to getting spending deals, as well as other legislative priorities. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The White House has an ambitious autumn and winter legislative agenda that includes avoiding another government shutdown and winning approval of a sweeping trade pact — but a key official says legislation aimed at preventing mass shootings is not certain to move this year.

Both chambers returned Monday from a rather bloody August recess in which more than 40 people died during mass shootings in four states. Members of both parties say they want to move some kind of bill aimed at curbing gun violence amid polling that shows large majorities of Republican and Democratic voters want Washington to act. But no plan that could pass the House and Senate — and get President Donald Trump’s signature — has emerged.

Trump says he’s preparing report on his personal finances
House Judiciary mentions president’s finances in announcing move toward impeachment articles

President Donald Trump greets Blake Marnell of San Diego, during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., on May 20. He spoke to reporters Monday as he left the White House for another rally, this one in North Carolina. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump said Monday he soon will release a report detailing his personal finances and declared secret talks he launched with Taliban leaders are “dead.”

“As far as I’m concerned they’re dead,” he said on the White House’s South Lawn as he departed for a campaign rally in 2020 battleground North Carolina. “They thought they had to kill people to put themselves a little bit better negotiating position. And when they did, they killed 12 people. One happened to be a great American soldier. … You can’t do that with me.”

UK’s Boris Johnson to White House: Buy our shower trays and Scottish haggis
Prime minister tells Pence his country’s National Health Service is off the table

Then-British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson meets with then-Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, R-Tenn., in the Capitol. Johnson is now the British prime minister and Corker has left the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Thursday offered some cheeky — but pointed — criticism of the United States and its trade practices, telling Vice President Mike Pence he wants to rip down “barriers” that keep British goods out of the massive American market.

Johnson also echoed his predecessor, Theresa May, by stating clearly that any potential U.S.-U.K. trade agreement would not include changes to his country’s National Health Service.

Google agrees to record fine for violating children’s privacy
Regulators say Google-owned YouTube violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act by gathering data on users under the age of 13

Democratic Sen. Edward J. Markey, a frequent critic of Google and YouTube, called fines against the tech giants announced Wednesday “let Google off the hook with a drop-in-tbe bucket fine.” (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Google agreed to pay a $170 million fine and overhaul privacy policies on YouTube after regulators said the company illegally gathered data on underage users and allowed advertisers to use the information to target children with advertisements, regulators announced Wednesday.

The settlement, reached with New York State Attorney General Letitia James and the Federal Trade Commission, is the largest ever resulting from a violation of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, known as COPPA. New York will receive $34 million of the settlement, and the remainder will go to the federal government.

‘American Factory’ arrives in time fraught with U.S.-China troubles
Netflix documentary humanizes international trade, labor fights in Dayton

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, makes an appearance in the Netflix documentary “American Factory,” including making comments encouraging a union movement at the facility in question in the Dayton area. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Timing is everything, and the Netflix documentary “American Factory” comes out in times tailor-made for its story of the rebirth of a former U.S. truck-making facility as a Chinese glass manufacturer in the heart of the Rust Belt. 

Dayton, Ohio, has been in the headlines lately for the horrific mass shooting earlier this month that killed 10 and injured 27. But the Gem City has a proud history as the home of the Wright brothers, the Dayton peace accords and an industrial hub. 

Democrats question Trump’s motives as Hurricane Dorian targets Florida
President’s decision to cancel Poland trip caught some aides off guard as polls turn bleak

President Donald Trump waves as he walks off Marine One at the White House on Friday. Trump said he canceled the trip to Poland so he could monitor Hurricane Dorian, but some Democrats see political motives. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump contends he canceled a diplomatic trip to Poland so he could monitor Hurricane Dorian as it churns toward Florida, but Democrats see political motives for the storm tracker in chief. And Trump started Friday clearly focused on other matters.

He claimed he was staying stateside “to ensure that all resources of the federal government are focused on the arriving storm,” and White House aides were eager to cast the president as laser-focused on the hurricane — even though his decision, yet again, caught some off guard.

The Emmanuel Macron approach to Donald Trump
Biarritz G7 summit showed approach of the French president to his elder counterpart

President Trump (center left) and other G7 leaders listen Sunday as French President Emmanuel Macron speaks during working session at a G7 summit in Biarritz, France. (Jeff J Mitchell - Pool /Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | All eyes were on Donald Trump during his G7 summit stay in a French resort town, but no one kept closer tabs on the mercurial “America first” president than Emmanuel Macron. 

The U.S. chief executive arrived in chic Biarritz during one of the most chaotic and strange weeks of his presidency. Macron might have given Trump, who was liberally lashing foes foreign and domestic, a wide berth.

Trump signals he’s open to Macron’s idea of a high-stakes meeting with Iran
U.S. president says regime change in Tehran is off the table because ‘it doesn't work’

President Donald Trump attends the first working session of the G7 Summit on Sunday in the French southwestern seaside resort of Biarritz. (Jeff J Mitchell/Pool/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump said Monday he would agree to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani over his country’s nuclear arms ambitions and actions in the Middle East — but he again threatened Tehran with “violent force.”

“I think we’re going to do something. It might not be immediately,” Trump said during a joint press conference in Biarritz with French President Emmanuel Macron, who is trying to broker the high-stakes meeting amid tensions between Trump and Rouhani that almost led to American strikes on Iran after Rouhani’s military downed a U.S. military drone aircraft.