district-of-columbia

Partisanship Shut Out at Congressional Baseball Game
Unity a big winner after gunman had disrupted GOP practice

During player introductions, Texas Rep. Roger Williams shakes hands with California Rep. Nanette Barragán as, from right, Reps. Mike Doyle of Pennsylvania, Joe L. Barton of Texas and Pete Aguilar of California look on during the Congressional Baseball Game in Nationals Park on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated June 19, 2017, 1:58 p.m. | The final moments of the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Thursday perfectly demonstrated the event’s purpose — finding unity amid heated competition.

Though the Democrats overwhelmingly beat the Republicans 11-2, that final score was eclipsed during the trophy presentation at the end of the night.

Trump Will Not Attend Congressional Baseball Game
White House cites insufficient time to secure Nationals Park

An investigator examines the third base dugout at the Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Va., to gather evidence in the shooting of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and others during baseball practice on Wednesday.  Due to security concerns, President Trump will not attend Thursday night's GOP vs. Democrats game at Nationals Park. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The White House says President Donald Trump will not attend Thursday night’s Congressional Baseball Game, citing insufficient time to fully secure Nationals Park.

Presidents have shown up at the annual Republicans vs. Democrats tilt, and press secretary Sean Spicer indicated Trump wanted to attend following Wednesday morning’s shooting at the GOP team’s practice session in Alexandria, Va. House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and four others were wounded by a 66-year-old Illinois man who appears to have been a staunch critic of Trump and Republicans.

At AFI Docs, Timely Topics

AFI Docs will screen the climate change documentary “An Inconvenient Sequel,” starring former Vice President Al Gore. (Photo courtesy of “An Inconvenient Sequel”).

AFI Docs, the annual documentary film festival put on by the American Film Institute in Washington, has to plan months ahead to get its slate of nonfiction movies.

Nevertheless, festival organizers seem to have a knack for finding films that have political currency.

Neighborhood Dispute: The D.C.-Maryland Lawsuit and Donald Trump
White House brushes aside suit, but conflict with home region is real

D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine, right, and Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh conduct a news conference on a lawsuit they filed Monday against President Donald Trump, alleging he violated the U.S. Constitution by accepting foreign payments through his businesses. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine can see the top of the Trump International Hotel from his Penn Quarter office. Whenever he looks at it, he sees the U.S. Constitution being trampled by President Donald Trump.

Racine and Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh announced Monday they have filed a lawsuit against Trump claiming his business ties violate the U.S. Constitution’s “Emoluments Clause.” By doing so, they fired the latest salvo in an ongoing battle between the Trump White House and the city and region it calls home.

D.C. Mayor Reaffirms Support for Paris Climate Agreement
Mayor Muriel Bowser says city will uphold the agreement’s goals

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has signed an executive order reaffirming the city’s support for the Paris climate agreement. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Washington D.C.’s mayor has announced that the city will continue to uphold the guidelines in the Paris climate agreement, just days after President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from it. 

Mayor Muriel Bowser signed an executive order Monday morning reaffirming the city’s support for the climate agreement, surrounded by local officials, federal partners and environmental stakeholders.

Senators Warn FCC, Trump Administration About Freedom of the Press
Comes after CQ Roll Call reporter was pinned against a wall while covering the commission

Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley says it is customary for reporters to question public officials after meetings, as he is seen doing here. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators, including Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, are warning the Federal Communications Commission about its treatment of reporters after a CQ Roll Call reporter was manhandled Thursday.

“The Federal Communications Commission needs to take a hard look at why this happened and make sure it doesn’t happen again. As The Washington Post pointed out, it’s standard operating procedure for reporters to ask questions of public officials after meetings and news conferences,” the Iowa Republican said. “It happens all day, every day. There’s no good reason to put hands on a reporter who’s doing his or her job.”  

Trump’s Promise to Repair the Nation’s Infrastructure is Off the Tracks
Problems with roads, bridges, railways, metros and tunnels are dire

President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office have come and gone, and we are no closer to an infrastructure package than we were when the president promised during his campaign to “build the next generation of roads, bridges, railways, tunnels, sea ports and airports that our country deserves.”

The dire infrastructure needs of our country, particularly in the Northeast, are glaring, and unless the president gets serious about the problem, things will only get worse.

7 Major Battles Ahead on the Environment
The environmental state of play on Trump's first Earth Day
D.C. Home Rule Advocates to Continue Fight After Chaffetz Retirement Announcement
Others on Oversight Committee may be targeted next

Golf balls with Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s face imprinted on them were a party favor at the Americans for Self-Rule PAC launch party this week. (Courtesy Lynette Craig)

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s announcement that he will retire from Congress at the end of 2018 has made some folks in Washington, D.C., very happy.

Advocates for District of Columbia sovereignty see Chaffetz, the chairman of the powerful House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, as one of their biggest tormentors. The Republican lawmaker especially riled local groups to action by attempting to exercise the committee’s authority to overturn D.C. laws under the Home Rule Act, long a sore spot for District residents.

Rising Stars 2017: Hill Staffers
Two experienced hands make the list

Two Capitol Hill staffers are among CQ Roll Call’s Rising Stars of 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Over the course of this week, CQ Roll Call is taking a look at 17 Rising Stars of 2017 — people who will now wield power and influence in a Washington that has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump.

Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene. They include members of Congress, congressional and administration staffers, and advocates.