district-of-columbia

Emails Show Farenthold’s Pursuit of Lobbying Job
Disgraced former Texas congressman landed position shortly after leaving Congress

Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, appeared to have started angling for a new job within a few weeks of leaving the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Emails between former Rep. Blake Farenthold and his new employer show the disgraced Texas Republican was angling for a lobbying job shortly after resigning from Congress.

The emails obtained by the Dallas Morning News through an open records request showed Farenthold was pushing for an answer on the lobbying job with the port authority in his former district.

Sinema Breaks Record at ACLI Capital Challenge Race
Wisconsin Rep. Mike Gallagher is fastest member of Congress for second year in a row

Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, number 120, watches as Reps. Mike Gallagher and Kyrsten Sinema celebrate their victories at Wednesday’s ACLI Capital Challenge. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 1:30 p.m. | Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona was the fastest female lawmaker and set a new course record for her division at the 37th annual ACLI Capital Challenge three-mile race Wednesday.

Sinema finished in 22 minutes and 3 seconds to break the course record of 22:41 held by former Republican Rep. Jean Schmidt of Ohio.

Members Dismiss Need for ‘Taxpayer-Funded Dorm’ in D.C.
Donovan says he would rather keep sleeping in his office rather than use taxpayer dollars

Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., said he doesn’t support a proposal to fund a facility for affordable housing for members of Congress in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Dan Donovan said he opposes legislation to provide members with cheap housing as an alternative to sleeping in his office.

The Republican congressman was one of several members who spoke to the New York Post about legislation being proposed by Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson.

Bishop Wants Answers on USDA Program That Kills Kittens
USDA disputes congressman’s estimate of cats used in ‘critical research’ of toxoplasmosis

Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., wants answers on a program by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that he says led to the deaths of kittens. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Michigan Rep. Mike Bishop wants an investigation into the Department of Agriculture’s “secretive and problematic” experiments that have reportedly led to the deaths of hundreds of kittens.

Bishop sent a letter on Tuesday to Secretary Sonny Perdue about the cats’ treatment in the experiments, WTOP reported.

Pelosi Confident on Possible Speakership, Won’t Speculate on Minority Scenario
On some Democrats’ calls for new leadership: ‘If they have to do that to win the election, I’m all for winning’

“I can't even think of not winning” control of the House in November, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, told a Washington audience on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi expressed confidence Tuesday in her ability to be elected speaker if Democrats retake the majority in November but wouldn’t say whether she’d stick around and run for minority leader if they fall short of that goal.

“I can’t even think of not winning,” the California Democrat said at a Politico Playbook event. “And you have to believe.”

Podcast: Use of Force vs. Use of Power
Roll Call Decoder, Episode 8

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., talks with reporters in the basement of the Capitol on March 20, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators on both sides are pushing to rewrite the law authorizing military force, untouched for 16 years. Even after airstrikes on Syria the debate is likely to fade fast, White House correspondent John Bennett explains, part of a complex modern war-making power dynamic that favors presidents over Congress.

Show Notes

House Chaplain Patrick Conroy to Step Down In May
Jesuit priest has served in the role since 2011

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy, right, attends a swearing-in ceremony for the new Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in 2016 with Sens. Ben Cardin, D-Md., center, and Roy Blunt, R-Mo. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The in-house chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives is stepping down next month after seven years in the post.

Rev. Patrick J. Conroy, 67, a Catholic priest of the Jesuit order, has served in the post since 2011, when then-Speaker John Boehner and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi pegged him for the post.

Three Big Hurdles for D.C. as Advocates Lobby for Statehood
Any form of Congress’ voting power would still have a few problems to overcome

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., speaks during a press conference to commemorate the renaming of the historic U.S. Post Office located at 2 Massachusetts Avenue NE in honor of Dr. Dorothy I. Height. Norton has been a longtime advocate of D.C. statehood. (Douglas Graham/Roll Call file photo)

Washington advocates used the leadup to Monday’s D.C. Emancipation Day celebrations to push once again for the District of Columbia to become a state.

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., has been a leader in the D.C. statehood effort for decades — she’s known for asking to be referred around the Capitol as representative, despite her non-voting status. Norton spoke about D.C. statehood in Congress again Thursday night ahead of Emancipation Day.

D.C. Weed Activist Moves to Maryland to Vote Harris Out
Wants D.C. to have control of its marijuana laws

Marijuana activist Adam Eidinger, founder of DCMJ.org, was arrested by Capitol Police last April after he and several others smoked marijuana in front of the U.S. Capitol last April. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Washington, D.C. marijuana activist Adam Eidinger moved to Maryland to vote out Rep. Andy Harris in hopes of giving the nation’s capital control of its marijuana laws.

Eidinger moved to the district to campaign for Allison Galbraith to beat GOP Rep. Andy Harris.

3 Takeaways From White House’s Semi-Denials of Pardon Talks
Aides offer qualifiers like ‘at this time’ and ‘as far as I know’

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort leaves the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington after a court hearing on the terms of his bail and house arrest on Nov. 6. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS | The White House on Wednesday did not categorically deny President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer discussed pardons for two former aides with their lawyers just as the special counsel was closing in on both.

At issue are conversations John Dowd, who left Trump’s outside legal team last week, allegedly had with the attorneys for Michael Flynn and Paul Manafort. The New York Times reported Wednesday afternoon that those conversations occurred, but the three sources it cites did not say that the president greenlighted those alleged conversations or was told about them after they might have occurred.