district-of-columbia

Eclipse Day in Photos: D.C. and N.C. Residents Look Up to the Sun
An eclipse was on the minds of most American residents on this Monday

The moon passes in front of the sun during the solar eclipse in Sylva, N.C. on Monday. The town lies in the path of totality. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Roll Call’s photographers caught the eclipse and the event’s spectators in two different locations on Monday. Tom Williams traveled to Sylva, N.C.,  in the path of totality. And Bill Clark stuck close to Roll Call’s home and captured moments as congressmen, reporters, congressional staffers and other Hill personnel ventured out on the Capitol steps and plaza to catch a glimpse of the historic event. 

Here’s the day in photos:

White House: Steve Bannon Is Out
President’s chief strategist increasingly a lightning rod for criticism

Steve Bannon is out as  chief strategist to President Donald Trump. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump has decided to part ways with White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. The former Breitbart executive infused his campaign and presidency with nationalist rhetoric and policies.

“White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Steve Bannon have mutually agreed today would be Steve’s last day,” Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. “We are grateful for his service and wish him the best.”

Appeals Court Strikes Down D.C. Concealed Weapons Law
Decision conflicts with other circuit court rulings

A federal appeals court has struck down a District of Columbia concealed firearms law. (iStock)

A federal appeals court struck down a District of Columbia law Tuesday that required a “good reason” to carry a concealed firearm, ruling that it essentially bans the Second Amendment right for most D.C. residents.

The decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit conflicts with rulings from other appeals courts on concealed-carry rights, potentially ripening the issue for a Supreme Court that for years has stayed on the sidelines of gun control laws.

Kushner to Tell Senators ‘I Did Not Collude’ With Russians
Statement downplays contacts, but shows Trump team’s desire for a thaw with Putin

President Donald Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner is expected to tell the Senate Intelligence Committee that his meetings with Russians were normal and innocent. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 9:06 a.m. | Jared Kushner is set to tell the Senate Intelligence Committee he was unaware that Donald Trump Jr. took a meeting with a Russian lawyer expecting to be given Kremlin-provided dirt on Hillary Clinton.

In prepared remarks the president’s son-in-law and senior White House adviser will deliver to the panel behind closed doors later Monday, Kushner will reject the notion that he or other Trump campaign staffers had nefarious ties with Moscow during the 2016 campaign.

Spicer’s Departure is Quickest Resignation for Press Secretary Since 1974
Trump’s first press secretary will leave after 223 days in the role

White House press secretary Sean Spicer leaves the Newseum in  April. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sean Spicer said on Friday that he would step down next month after just 223 days as White House press secretary. It will be the quickest voluntary exit for the position since Jerald terHorst resigned in 1974 after just a month — in protest of President Gerald Ford’s pardon of former president Richard Nixon. 

D.C. Law Banning Wet Wipes Could Clog Appropriations
Fatbergs: An amalgamation of sewer waste made worse by pre-moistened wipes

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, seen here in 2016, joined other D.C. politicians at a news conference on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By KELLIE MEJDRICH and DOUG SWORD

District of Columbia leaders on Monday warned Congress to stay out of local issues and keep policy riders aimed at D.C. laws away from spending bills, a battle the District fights annually.

Photos of the Day: Health Care Protests Erupt Across Capitol Hill
Monday saw approximately 80 arrests, according to Capitol Police

Health care protesters from Arkansas chant outside of the office of Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday. About a dozen people loudly voiced opposition to the GOP health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate returned from recess Monday and was greeted by protesters who oppose the GOP plan to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

Throughout the handful of House and Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill, protesters began demonstrating around 2 p.m. Monday, according to a statement by the United States Capitol Police. As of 4:30 p.m., 80 protesters had been arrested after they “refused to cease and desist” from “unlawful demonstration activities.”

Photos of the Year, So Far: 186 Days Into a New Washington
The first half of 2017 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

JANUARY 26: President Donald Trump shakes hands with Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., as he arrives on stage while Vice President Mike Pence looks on, at the GOP Congressional retreat in Philadelphia. House and Senate Republicans held their retreat there through Friday in Philadelphia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

BY BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS

2017 is now more than halfway complete. That's right, this weekend was the six-month mark on a year that’s brought a great deal of change to the nation’s capital.

Photos of the Week: July 4 Recess Begins After Senate Health Care Vote Delayed
The week of June 26 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Rep. Ryan Costello, R-Pa., runs past Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., on the House steps as members of Congress leave for the 4th of July recess following the final votes of the week in the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS

Members dashed back to their home states after a raucous week in Washington. Tuesday was marked with the news that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had delayed the chamber's vote on its version of a health care bill to repeal and replace Obamacare. The House saw the addition of two new members with the swearings in of Reps. Ralph Norman, R-S.C., and Karen Handel, R-Ga., to replace members who departed for President Donald Trump's Cabinet.

Kasich on Health Care Bill: ‘Not Acceptable’
Ohio governor says he’s worried about bill’s effects on mentally and chronically ill, and working poor

Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich, right, and Colorado Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper discuss the Senate health care reform bill at the National Press Club on Tuesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Ohio Gov. John Kasich didn’t want to talk about how Ohio Sen. Rob Portman might vote on the Republican health care bill.

“I’ve told him how important I think all this is,” Kasich cut off a reporter in mid-question when asked at a National Press Club event Tuesday about his discussions with Portman on the bill. “I don’t cast his vote. … We’ll see what happens when the card goes in the box — or however they vote in the Senate.”