donald-trump

Trump’s First 100 Days Mostly Lags Predecessors
A look at the 45th president’s report card, compared to the five before him

The White House planned a flurry of activities for the week leading up to President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office. One event he attended was on the Hill — a Days of Remembrance ceremony to commemorate the Holocaust. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first 100 days benchmark that President Donald Trump will pass on Saturday, in so many ways, sums up his presidency to date: he has both dismissed it as “ridiculous” while also endorsing its value through planned events, policy announcements and even a statement regarding his accomplishments.

In the week leading up to his 100th day, the 45th president signed executive actions aimed at rolling back Obama-era federal monument designations, and ones that aim to crack down on other countries' steel and aluminum “dumping” into U.S. markets. He ratcheted up his tough talk on Canada’s trade practices, threatened to withdraw from NATO and rolled out a tax plan.

Analysis: Democrats Try to Force Republicans’ Hands — but Can They?
Republicans still have the edge in political maneuvering

Democrats are hoping to force the Republicans’ hand through legislation from Massachusetts Rep. Katherine M. Clark. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats want to force Republicans’ hands on President Donald Trump’s tax returns — but it remains to be see how effective posturing can be for the minority party.

Democrats in the chamber plan to have Massachusetts Rep. Katherine M. Clark introduce legislation requiring Trump to release his tax returns from 2007 to 2016, according to The Washington Post. 

With Spending Deal Close, Trump Lambasts Democrats
Pelosi: Trump ‘projecting his own bad intentions’ in his Twitter rants

President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Thursday to blast Democrats just as the negotiations on a government funding bill are entering the most serious phase. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With less than 48 hours to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump on Thursday voiced his opposition to including in a government funding bill two items that are vitally important for Democrats.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi reiterated Thursday morning that Democrats want a still-emerging spending measure for the rest of fiscal 2017 to include funds for financially struggling Puerto Rico. Democrats also say they have secured an agreement from the Trump administration to continue paying subsidies to health insurers — though Trump officials say those payments will not necessarily continue permanently.

Collin Peterson Running for Re-Election Next Year
In neighboring Minnesota 8th District, Rick Nolan is still unsure

Rep. Collin C. Peterson, right, says he’s running for re-election in 2018 while fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan is still contemplating a gubernatorial run. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democrat whose potential retirement gives his party the most heartburn every year, Minnesota Rep. Collin C. Peterson, is running for re-election next year.

“Yeah, I'm running. I’ve got 700 grand in the bank,” Peterson said outside the House chamber Wednesday afternoon.

Trump Says U.S. Will ‘Terminate’ NAFTA if Talks Fail
President has stipulations about talks with Mexico and Canada

President Donald Trump threatened to withdraw from NAFTA if he, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, shown here, and their Mexican counterpart are unable to renegotiate the pact. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

Spending Shutdown Showdown Fizzling Out
Issues remain, but biggest fights getting knocked out ahead of deadline

From left, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Reps. David McKinley, R-W.Va., and Mike Doyle, D-Pa., attend a news conference at the House Triangle with the United Mine Workers of America on the Miners Protection Act, which would address expiring health care and pension benefits. Funding the miners’ benefits is one of the remaining issues that could affect the debate over government funding. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first federal funding fight of President Donald Trump’s administration might be ending not with a bang but a whimper. 

House and Senate lawmakers negotiating an omnibus bill to fund the government through the end of September had said the biggest outstanding dispute was over cost-sharing subsidy payments to insurance companies that help lower-income people afford health care under the 2010 overhaul law.

The Important Connection Between Governors and Congress
A first look at the gubernatorial race ratings for 2017-18

South Dakota Rep. Krisit Noem is a candidate for governor in 2018 and leaves behind a safe Republican seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In Washington, it’s easy to ignore governors as distant rulers over far away lands. But now is a good time to start paying attention to what’s happening in state races.

Voters in 38 states (including nine of the 10 most populated) will elect a governor over the next two years, and the results have a direct connection to Capitol Hill. The large number of races give aspiring (or weary) members an opportunity to leave the House, and consequently, leave behind potentially vulnerable open seats. And governors in 28 of those states will have a role (specifically veto power) in the next round of redistricting, which will impact what party controls the House in the next decade. 

Opinion: The Obama Effect — Pros and Cons for Republicans and Democrats
Former president could unite a party in distress

Former President Barack Obama’s influence could unite a Democratic Party that showed togetherness after President Donald Trump’s win but is already breaking apart on issues such as abortion rights, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

Barack Obama, the charismatic former president, can cause a scene just by walking into a coffee shop, as the rapturous crowds in usually blase New York City demonstrated at one of his cameos. So as he gently re-entered the public and policy eye this week, it’s no surprise that he could throw both Democrats and Republicans off balance — though of course for very different reasons.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave President Donald Trump possibly his most important first-100-day achievement by spearheading the maneuver to transform Obama’s Supreme Court pick to replace Antonin Scalia into the conservative Neil Gorsuch, whose first significant vote allowed an Arkansas execution to proceed. McConnell’s obstruction and subsequent “nuclear option” may have played a part in breaking the democratic process, but isn’t that a small price to pay for a win —  at least I’m sure the president feels that way.

Jim Jordan for Oversight Chairman? ‘We’ll See’
Former Freedom Caucus chairman leaves open bid for Chaffetz gavel

Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, center, is the highest ranking Freedom Caucus member on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan signaled Wednesday he might be interested in leading the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee should current Chairman Jason Chaffetz decide to leave Congress early, as has been speculated since the Utah Republican announced he would not run for re-election in 2018.

“We’ll see if and when that happens,” Jordan said when asked if he would vie for the gavel.

Opinion: A Disturbing Trend Against Women’s Health
President Donald Trump is undermining access to critical services

President Donald Trump has attacked women’s access to critical health care services, New York Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Despite the fact that most Americans want their leaders focused on creating jobs and boosting the economy, in his first 100 days in office, President Donald Trump has spent significant time and effort attacking women’s access to critical health care services and it is clear that women should expect even more harmful policies in the future.

On January 23, 2017, just two days after millions across the country and the world came together for the historic Women’s March, President Trump signed an executive order taking away rights from millions of women. He reinstated and expanded the global gag rule, a policy that bars both foreign nongovernmental and multilateral organizations from receiving U.S. family planning funds if — with other, non-U.S. funds — they provide abortion counseling, referrals, or even advocacy efforts.