fighting-words

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

Yvette Clarke: ‘We Can't Continue to Pay’ For Trump’s Family
Brooklyn congresswoman says it ‘won’t be long’ before Trump is impeached

Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-N.Y., said she will continue to see that President Donald Trump is “removed from office as soon as possible.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Yvette Clarke told a town hall meeting in Brooklyn that taxpayers “cannot continue to pay” for President Donald Trump’s family’s business and travel arrangements.

Clarke criticized Trump’s sons Eric and Donald Jr. for their travels, for having New York City foot the bill to protect Trump’s family at Trump Tower, and for his frequent trips to Florida, the New York Observer reported.

Clay to Appeal Judge’s Rejection of Student Painting
Says it’s a matter of the First Amendment

Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-Mo., shown here with Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., in front of the painting by then-Missouri high school student David Pulphus, said freedom of speech should be respected, especially in the Capitol. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Missouri Rep. William Lacy Clay and the winner of a congressional art contest will appeal a judge’s rejection of attempts to return his painting to the U.S. Capitol.

The painting, "Untitled #1," was criticized as anti-police and repeatedly taken down from an exhibit by Republican congressmen before it was ultimately removed by the Architect of the Capitol.

BunnyPAC Hopes to Thump Duncan Hunter on Rabbitgate
Hunter’s people say it’s pure politics

Reps. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., faces a federal investigation into campaign spending. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A political action committee is relying on a rabbit to help California Rep. Duncan Hunter hop out of Congress.

BunnyPAC was started by Shawn VanDiver, a Navy veteran who runs his own consulting firm in San Diego. It is rooted in allegations that Hunter used campaign money for personal expenses, including paying for airline fare for the family’s pet rabbit.

Freedom Caucus Member’s Book Slams Money-Obsessed Politicians
In ‘Drain the Swamp,’ Ken Buck also takes aim at NRCC’s ‘pay-to-play’ culture

Colorado Rep. Ken Buck attributes criticism of the House Freedom Caucus to “just plain jealousy.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Freedom Caucus member Ken Buck describes a money-hungry, lobbyist-influenced Republican leadership in his first book “Drain the Swamp” but he told CQ Roll Call that life is better for the hard-line conservative faction under Speaker Paul D. Ryan.

The Colorado Republican, now in his second term, has few kind words in his book released this week for Ryan’s predecessor, Ohio’s John A. Boehner, whom conservative lawmakers worked to oust. Boehner has since set up a practice at the K Street firm Squire Patton Boggs, and his spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Coffman Says Spicer ‘Needs to Go’
Colorado Republican holds first town hall since he had to escape January event

Rep. Mike Coffman told a town hall crowd in his Colorado district “We have to be realistic” on the approach to immigration policy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Colorado Rep. Mike Coffman told a town hall audience in his district that White House press secretary Sean Spicer needs to leave.

“He needs to go,” Coffman said in response to a question about Spicer’s recent comments saying Adolf Hitler did not use chemical weapons like Syrian dictator Bashar Al-Assad, the Denver Post reported.

Town Hall Crowd Yells ‘You Lie’ at Joe Wilson
Famously yelled the remark at Obama in 2009

Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., received a series of boos and chants of "you lie" at a town hall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

South Carolina Republican Rep. Joe Wilson heard a series of boos and chants of “you lie” from attendees at a town hall back home in his district.

The crowd drowned the congressman out with boos and a 30-second-long chant of “You lie,” the phrase Wilson famously yelled at President Barack Obama in his joint address to Congress in 2009, the Post and Courier of Charleston reported.

Trump: ‘North Korea is Looking for Trouble’
President vows to ‘solve’ problem with or without China

Chinese President Xi and President Trump, along with their wives, pose last Friday during their 24-hour summit in Florida. (Wikimedia Commons)

Five days after firing five dozen Tomahawk missiles at a Syrian air base, President Donald Trump on Tuesday morning threatened to “solve” the North Korea “problem” alone if China refuses to do more.

The president used two Twitter posts to send messages to Pyongyang and its lone remaining ally, China, dangling a trade deal more beneficial for Beijing in return for its help curbing North Korea’s nuclear arms and long-range missile programs.

After Syria Strike, Trump Administration Talks Tough
White House’s domestic focus pivots to warning foes president will ‘act’

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross fires a Tomahawk missile as part of strikes on Syria ordered by President Trump on Thursday evening. (Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert S. Price/U.S. Navy)

The Trump administration is suddenly warning would-be foes and touting its leader as a no-nonsense commander in chief, after focusing mostly on domestic policy for its first 77 days.

Last week, the White House was still very much concentrated on health care, a tax overhaul and other domestic agenda items. It held special advance briefings on Trump’s summit with his Chinese counterpart, addressing trade and his use of the Congressional Review Act. It centered on U.S. jobs and on rolling back Obama-era regulations to give a boost — as the administration contends — to the American economy. Trump’s aides were very much in a mode to enact his “America First” agenda, pushing his efforts to “rebuild our country,” as the president himself often puts it.

Opinion: Would Trump Nuke Congressional Budget Rules?
They could stand in the way of president’s infrastructure plans

President Donald Trump may feel that he has the credibility to shatter the Republican consensus on budgetary issues now that his nominee has joined the Supreme Court, Walter Shapiro writes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If real life resembled apocalyptic 1950s movies, the triggering of the nuclear option would have left a radioactive cloud all over North America and Europe. And the remnants of humanity would be hunkering down in Australia, calculating how long it would take for the deadly wind currents to reach that far south.

Instead, when the Senate went nuclear, Neil Gorsuch was elevated to the Supreme Court and Congress went home for recess without needing Geiger counters or fallout shelters. In fact, amid the thrill-a-minute gyrations of the Donald Trump White House, the nuclear option is already half-forgotten as all punditry is now raining down on the cruise missile strike in Syria.