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Mullin Plays Fitness Instructor for No-Politics, Bipartisan Workout
Men's Health Month hourlong workout kicked off Friday on Capitol Hill

Members prepare before the Friday morning workout, lead by Rep. Markwayne Mullin, pointing at right. (Alex Gangitano/ CQ Roll Call)

Because bipartisan athletic competitions are the theme of this summer, the annual Men’s Health Month congressional workout attracted a very diverse crowd of fit members.

Rep. Markwayne Mullin played fitness instructor and led the workout on Friday morning, which was attended by more than 60 people at the park behind the Longworth House Office building.

Word on the Hill: Happy Birthday, Dianne Feinstein!
‘Game of Thrones’ and Japanese agriculture

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein arrives at the Capitol for the Senate Democrats’ policy lunch in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s Dianne Feinstein’s birthday. The oldest currently serving senator turns 84 today. The California Democrat has been in the Senate since 1992.

Feinstein also happens to share a birthday with other powerful Democrats in Congress: Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts turns 68 today.

Natives on the Hill Aims to Be an Antidote to Homesickness
Three staffers launch new group for fellow Native Americans

Natives on the Hill co-founders, from left, Renée Gasper, Catelin Aiwohi and Kim Moxley. (Courtesy Sen. Tom Udall’s office)

A new staff association hopes to help Native Americans feel at home in D.C.

“A lot of us are away from home, and so there’s a community element to it. It’s harder to feel Indian sometimes in D.C. because you’re disconnected from ceremonies, cultural events,” said Kim Moxley, co-founder of Natives on the Hill. “It’s like a ‘battling homesickness’ mechanism.”

Bipartisanship Continues to Show Strength in Congressional Softball Game
Members’ team lost but the focus was on camaraderie and charity

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., greets members of the press team at the Congressional Women's Softball Game. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The positive energy and sense of community spilled over to the Congressional Women’s Softball Game from the previous week’s Congressional Baseball Game. With a record number of tickets sold and money raised for young women with breast cancer, the members losing 2-1 to the media team didn’t seem so bad.

“We tried hard and we’ll try hard next year, but it was a great night and I felt like not only did we come together as a Congress, both Dems and Republicans, but as a community,” New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said. “I think it showed our strength.”

Survey: Optimism Grows Among Democratic Staffers
Aides are more confident minority party can block GOP agenda

The top three Democrats in the Senate, from left, Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin, Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and Assistant Democratic Leader Patty Murray leave a policy luncheon in the Capitol on April 25. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican congressional staffers remain hopeful that they’ll enact significant legislation in 2017, but their Democratic counterparts are gaining confidence that they can block the GOP agenda, according to the June Capitol Insiders Survey of Hill aides.

Two-thirds of the Republican respondents expected it’s at least somewhat likely they’ll enact legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. But only one in five of the Democrats said the same.

Word on the Hill: Father’s Day
After a chaotic week, celebrate Dad

A famous father-son duo: California Rep. Jimmy Panetta and former Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, also an ex-California congressman. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Friday morning. Last night’s Congressional Baseball Game was emotional and eventful.

Check out all our coverage from the game and the atmosphere at the stadium. Look out for more to come throughout the day.

Opinion: Two Shootings in Less Than Seven Years Is Two Too Many
A lesson from Giffords, Scalise and Trump: tone it down

Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords hugs President Barack Obama at his 2012 State of the Union address as then-Rep. Jeff Flake looks on. (Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call file photo)

I’ll never forget the moment when my sense of professionalism as a journalist failed me most.

It was Jan. 25, 2012. I had raced to the corridor behind the back door of the House chamber to catch a glimpse of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona. A year had passed since a deranged lunatic fired a bullet into her brain and killed six others in a Tucson parking lot, and Giffords had just resigned her House seat.

Harriet Tubman Statue May Come to Capitol
Maryland wants to add abolitionist to the halls of Congress

Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen is working to place a statue of Harriet Tubman in the Capitol (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The state of Maryland is moving closer to having a statue of abolitionist Harriet Tubman built for display in the United States Capitol.

The state’s junior senator, Democrat Chris Van Hollen, said at a recent hearing that his staff has been working with the Architect of the Capitol to plan for the creation and donation of the sculpture.

Word on the Hill: Watergate Anniversary
Harris to be recognized

From left, Connecticut Sen. Lowell P. Weicker Jr., Florida Sen. Edward J. Gurney, Chief minority counsel (and later senator) Fred Thompson, Tennessee Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., North Carolina Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr., Chief counsel Samuel Dash, Georgia Sen. Herman E. Talmadge, Hawaii Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii, and New Mexico Sen. Joseph M. Montoya during the Senate Watergate hearings. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been 45 years since Watergate and the landmark hotel where it all began wants to talk about how the scandal reverberates today.

Rakel Cohen, co-owner of the hotel, is hosting a “Watergate Chat” Wednesday evening with The Atlantic’s Steve Clemons to discuss the break-in and how it relates to current politics. 5 p.m. at The Watergate Hotel (2650 Virginia Ave. NW)

Word on the Hill: Calm After the Storm
Security increased for Capital Pride weekend

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein wore a seersucker suit Thursday in honor of National Seersucker Day in the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Things on Capitol Hill should have settled down today, a day after former FBI Director James B. Comey’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Members of Congress and senators have skipped town and headed home.