hillside

Word on the Hill: Peters’ Motorcycle Ride
Recess activities for Cárdenas, Ferguson and Hudson

Michigan Sen. Gary Peters toured the Aspirus Ontonagon Hospital in Ontonagon, Mich., on his bike ride. (Courtesy Peters via Twitter)

Motorcycle enthusiast Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., took his annual recess motorcycle tour of the Wolverine State this week.

The senator visited a rural airport to talk about President Donald Trump’s budget cuts to Essential Air Service, a government program enacted to guarantee that small communities maintain commercial airline service. 

HOH’s Guide for Watching the Eclipse in D.C.
You can either avoid or embrace the crowds

Watch here on Monday for photographs of the eclipse and the Washington Monument on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The peak time to view the solar eclipse on Monday in Washington, D.C., is 2:42 p.m. The moon will block part of the sun from our area’s vantage point from about  1:17 p.m. and end around 4:01 p.m.

Only a partial solar eclipse is expected in the nation’s capital, but there are plenty of open places from which to view it. City rooftops and the National Mall will be packed with people wearing the special viewing glasses.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Hill Could Save You Money
Ryan in New Hampshire, Williams at nonprofit, Murphy’s march continues

Save some money, move to Capitol Hill. Above, Tennessee’s David Kustoff arrives at the Capitol Hill Hotel for new member orientation on Nov. 14, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Here’s some good news for congressional staffers: Capitol Hill was ranked the fourth best place in D.C. to save money if you’re living off an annual salary of $50,000.

The financial planning app Rize released a list of the 14 best and worst places to live in D.C. on a $50,000 salary. Petworth, NoMa and Southwest Waterfront ranked first, second and third, respectively. Georgetown was ranked last.

The Long, Accident-Prone History of Getting the Library of Congress Out of the Capitol
Summer lecture outlines what led to the construction of one of Washington’s grand buildings

The Court of Neptune, the fountain at the front of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, gets a cleaning in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Library of Congress is one of the most ornate buildings in Washington, but its story isn’t nearly as magnificent as the structure — it was once extensive, complex, accident-prone, and outgrew its original home in the Capitol.

The United States Capitol Historical Society is focusing its summer lecture series this month on that story. To kick it off last week, Janice McKelvey, an LOC visitor services coordinator, traced the history of the library’s spaces in the Capitol, and discussed architectural and artistic similarities between those and its present home in the Thomas Jefferson Building.

Word on the Hill: Weekend Plans?
WOTH will be back mid-August

It's finally the weekend so get out of the Capitol — and the capital. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the weekend in Washington and the Senate recess has finally arrived, so pick up a book from our summer reading list, or if you're feeling active, try to beat the number of steps that Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., takes in a day.

HOH went for a walk with the congressman recently and ran some errands around the complex with him.

Word on the Hill: Get Cultured in Rayburn
Yappy hour, and honoring the Mooch

A preview of the artwork from Asian-American artists on display in Rayburn today. (Courtesy Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation)

There are three different opportunities today to check out Asian-American artists and history in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation is hosting an art exhibit “War and Refuge: Reflections on the Vietnamese Refugee Experience and Its Applicability to the Global Migration Crisis” from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the building’s foyer. The foundation works to educate people about the ideology, history, and legacy of communism in order to create “a world free from the false hope of communism.”

Woman Arrested in House Office Building After Handgun Found in Suitcase
Suspect was trying to enter Cannon on Friday afternoon

Capitol Police say Kimberly Barber, 34, of Washington was arrested after she tried to pass through security at the Cannon House Office Building with a handgun in one of her suitcases. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Washington, D.C., woman was arrested Friday while trying to bring a loaded handgun into the Cannon House Office Building as members were getting ready to leave for their August recess.

At 12:21 p.m., Capitol Police found the handgun at the bottom of a suitcase that was carried through security by Kimberly D. Barber, according to a Capitol Police weekly arrest summary released Wednesday.

Word on the Hill: From Little League World Series to Congress
Solar talk and Stevie Wonder tickets

Florida Rep. Ron DeSantis bats during a Little League baseball game in 1991. (Courtesy DeSantis’ office)

Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., passed along some veteran advice for a Florida Little League baseball team, which is competing for a regional title this weekend and a chance to play in the Little League World Series.

The Palm Beach Post asked DeSantis, who played in the Little League World Series in 1991, for his thoughts. 

Word on the Hill: Bike Your District
Hiking town hall and BaconFest

West Virginia Rep. Alex X. Mooney tweeted a photo from his bike ride across his district. (Courtesy Mooney’s Twitter page)

Lawmakers often find interesting ways to travel across their states or districts each recess.

Last August, Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., walked across the Nutmeg State, and Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., did a motorcycle tour across the Wolverine State.

Word on the Hill: Kushner Meets Congressional Interns
Dog Days of Summer Yappy Hour

Jared Kushner, the President’ Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, leaves the Hart Senate Office Building after his interview with the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee staff on Monday, July 24. (By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

First son-in-law Jared Kushner is scheduled to speak to interns on Capitol Hill today at 3 p.m. as part of the House Administration Committee and Senate Committee on Rules and Administration’s Intern Lecture Series.

It was originally scheduled for July 28 and then moved to today. The White House senior adviser’s lecture will take place in the Capitol Visitor Center’s Congressional Auditorium.