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Photos of the Week: Senate Grills Sessions and Adopts Budget
The week of Oct. 16 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., takes a selfie on Tuesday outside of Dirksen Building along Constitution Avenue NE. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate was the only congressional chamber in session this week as the House recessed for members to spend time in their districts. On the list of what the Senate tackled this week — a hearing with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the adoption of a budget resolution that's another step in the path toward a tax overhaul.

Ryan Takes Jabs at Trump at New York Fundraiser
House speaker does not spare Schumer, Weiner or Bannon in his standup delivery

President Donald Trump greets Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., after addressing a joint session of Congress in the Capitol's House Chamber in February. On Thursday, Ryan had a little fun at the president’s expense. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan jumped at the opportunity Thursday to poke a little fun at President Donald Trump’s expense.

The Wisconsin Republican delivered a series of jokes, many aimed at the president’s tweeting habits, ego, and former chief political strategist Steve Bannon at a formal charity dinner in New York.

Johnson Backs Away From Sexual Harassment Remarks
Texas congresswoman said she remembered when ‘it was as much the woman’s responsibility as the man’s’

Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas, walked back her comments about sexual assault. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson walked back comments she made about women sharing responsibility in sexual harassment and assault.

The Texas Democrat’s remarks were initially in response to allegations about Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulting numerous women.

Wilson on Kelly Criticism: ‘He Can't Lie on Me’
Florida Democrat says she has received threatening calls from white nationalists

Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., stood by her criticism of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Florida Rep. Frederica Wilson said Friday that White House Chief of Staff John Kelly lied Thursday about her involvement in funding for an FBI building in her district.

“He can’t just go on TV and lie on me,” Wilson told CNN Friday morning.

Word on the Hill: King of the Hill
Senate Democrats celebrating birthdays

Team photograph of The RBIs of Texas after winning the King of the Hill softball championship game. (Courtesy Bill Christian)

The Senate is the King of the Hill. Well, at least in staffer softball.

The annual King of the Hill softball championship game was Thursday and the RBIs of Texas, the Senate team, beat the Texas Republic, the House team, 16-12.

Regular Order? Maybe Not For Alexander-Murray Bill
A markup could open door to partisan battle over the 2010 health law

Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., ranking member, are seen during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing in Dirksen Building titled "Examining How Healthy Choices Can Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Costs," on October 19. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A committee markup of a bipartisan health bill from Sens. Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray could add another potentially fatal complication for the measure that is already under significant pressure.

Senators from both parties have for months decried the lack of regular order in the chamber as Republicans tried to jam through legislation to repeal the 2010 health law.

Meet Pat Tiberi, the Latest Soon-to-Be-Ex-Congressman
Ohio policy wonk liked his bocce

Pat Tiberi succeeded his former boss in the House, John Kasich. (Ian Wagreich/Roll Call)

Rep. Pat Tiberi, the Ohio Republican who announced it was quitting time on Thursday, is a serious policy wonk with deep political roots in the Buckeye State and a big fan of bocce, befitting his celebration of his Italian heritage.

An unapologetic Midwestern Rotary Club-type Republican in the mode of his political patrons, former Speaker John A. Boehner and Gov. John R. Kasich, Tiberi will leave Congress by Jan. 31 — before his ninth term in the House ends — and become head of the Ohio Business Roundtable.

Kid Rock’s Stage and Screen Path to Political Spotlight Well-Worn
Reagan was the prototype, but many have tried to follow his lead

President Ronald Reagan set the bar for entertainers who aspire to political office. He is shown here at his inauguration in 1981. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Ronald Reagan was perhaps the highest-profile entertainer who decided to give politics a try.

Rating Change: Democratic Challenger Puts Utah Seat in Play
Rep. Mia Love facing competitive race with Salt Lake County mayor’s entry

Utah Rep. Mia Love faces a competitive re-election contest next year. (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

It’s not hard to see Democratic takeover opportunities in districts where Hillary Clinton prevailed or President Donald Trump won narrowly last fall, but Democrats have expanded the map with at least a couple of recruits who should make Republicans work to defend some deeper red territory next year.

Former Kansas state Rep. Paul Davis, for example, announced his candidacy in August, giving Democrats a credible candidate in the Sunflower State’s 2nd District, which Trump carried by 18 points, according to calculations by Daily Kos Elections. Davis, a former state House minority leader, carried the district in his 2014 gubernatorial bid, and when he entered the congressional race for retiring Rep. Lynn Jenkins’ open seat, we changed the rating from Likely Republican to Leans Republican.

Pat Tiberi Resigning to Lead Ohio Business Roundtable
Nine-term lawmaker will leave behind solid Republican seat

Ohio Rep. Pat Tiberi has been offered a position to lead the Ohio Business Roundtable. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Rep. Pat Tiberi announced Thursday he will not seek re-election and will be leaving Congress before the 2018 midterms. 

“While I have not yet determined a final resignation date, I will be leaving Congress by January 31, 2018,” the Republican said in a statement.