impeachment-impeachment

View from the gallery: Lots of cross-party talk — and cross-contamination — at Senate trial
Mitt Romney finds a loophole in the beverage rule

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, talks with reporters in the Senate subway before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York sat still at his desk as President Donald Trump’s defense team played a montage of decades-old statements from Democrats regarding Bill Clinton’s impeachment.

It ended with a clip of Schumer, then a House member, warning against the dangers of partisan impeachment. 

Impeachment trial, like much of Trump’s presidency, is unprecedented
Outcome could set new standards for presidential behavior and congressional oversight

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. leaves the Capitol on Saturday after the Senate adjourned for the day in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, like many of his administration’s actions before it, has ventured into uncharted legal territory.

The trial lacks definitive answers on key issues, either from federal courts or the Senate itself, which has fed an undercurrent of uncertainty about what happens next in an institution usually steeped in precedents and traditions.

Trump’s legal team quickly wraps defense of president at impeachment trial
Defense argued Tuesday that Democrats were playing politics with impeachment powers

President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Jay Sekulow arrives to the Capitol before the continuation of Trump’s impeachment trial on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump’s attorneys utilized just 10 of the 24 hours allotted to them to defend the president against two articles of impeachment charging him with obstruction of Congress and abuse of power, concluding their three-day presentation Tuesday by arguing that Democrats’ case amounted merely to politics.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone closed the defense’s case by urging senators to consider their role and the lasting impact that their decision could make on American history.

Can you point to Ukraine? It may be a while before you get your chance
State Department delays request for unlabeled map Mike Pompeo used to challenge NPR reporter

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the State Department earlier this month. He used an unlabeled map in an attempt to stump NPR reporter Mary Louise Kelly on the location of Ukraine. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had a challenge for NPR reporter Mary Louise Kelly after their interview Friday: Find Ukraine on a blank map.

Anyone who wants to see the map Pompeo used may face another challenge. Getting a copy could take months — or even years.

Subpoena for Bolton’s unpublished book would likely face fierce resistance
Intellectual property rights among issues that could entangle legislative branch, publisher

The forthcoming book by former national security adviser John Bolton could lead to a protracted fight if it is subpoenaed in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

Congress could subpoena the manuscript of former national security adviser John Bolton’s forthcoming book on his time in the White House, but such a move could raise concerns about intellectual property rights and lead to a fight between lawmakers and Bolton and his publishers.

“Either [chamber] of Congress has the ability to subpoena records, including unpublished manuscripts,” said Chris Armstrong, the former chief oversight counsel for the Senate Finance Committee.

View from the gallery: Senators’ personal habits on full display as week 2 begins
One senator picked his nose, while an attorney swiped a souvenir

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., walks to the Senate chamber for the start of the impeachment trial proceedings Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tennessee Republican Lamar Alexander fought off sleep as President Donald Trump’s legal team discussed a history of subpoena litigation, eyes closed, his cheek resting on his hand, his chin sometimes dropping toward his orange sweater.

When Deputy White House counsel Patrick Philbin announced he was ready to wrap up his portion of Trump’s presentation, Alexander studied his watch.

Dershowitz argues Trump cannot be convicted without a criminal offense
President’s legal team focuses heavily on Bidens in Day 5 of impeachment trial

An iPhone playing the House impeachment managers’ news conference Monday sits on the floor of the Senate Reception Room before the start of the trial proceedings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Alan Dershowitz, former Harvard Law School professor and controversial defense attorney, made his debut in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Monday with a deep history lesson and argument that the president cannot be convicted without an actual criminal offense.

Trump’s defense team teased Dershowitz’s arguments more than once throughout the day, like the evening news promotes its big story. And it was not an accident that the star consultant on the Trump defense team landed in primetime.

View from the gallery: Senators suffer through sniffles and sleepiness at Trump trial
House managers wrap up their presentation before an increasingly restless Senate

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham is surrounded by reporters Friday as he arrives for the Senate Republicans’ lunch before the start of the day’s impeachment trial proceedings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham, one of the president’s fiercest defenders in the Senate, chuckled, bowed his head slightly and rubbed his left eyebrow.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and California Sen. Dianne Feinstein laughed and met the eyes of their knowing Democratic colleagues.

House managers focus on Trump’s ‘defiance’ in closing of impeachment presentation
Trump’s defense team will make the president’s case Saturday

House impeachment managers Zoe Lofgren and Adam B. Schiff, center, walk through the Ohio Clock Corridor on Friday on their way to a news conference before the start of the day’s impeachment trial proceedings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House impeachment managers on Friday concluded their third and final day of arguments to remove President Donald Trump from office by focusing on the House investigation and appealing to authority and emotion.

Lead manager Adam B. Schiff, a former federal prosecutor, forcefully laid out the House’s case in his closing statement, arguing that Trump would “remain a threat to the Constitution” if he were allowed to remain in office. 

Schiff’s emotional closing appeals set expectations for his Friday finale
Former prosecutor tries to appeal to GOP senators’ sense of right and wrong

House impeachment managers Adam B. Schiff, D-Calif., left, and Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., are wrapping up their arguments in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Adam B. Schiff’s prosecutorial tone changed considerably at the end of the first two days of President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, a preview that his presentation finale Friday night will feature loftier rhetoric about showing courage and doing what’s right, even when it risks a career.

“Every night we say, ‘Adam save it for the end,’ and every night he outdoes the night before,” Ohio Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown said.