legal-affairs

Wicker Renews Call to Remove Confederate Emblem From Mississippi Flag
GOP senator condemns use of state flag as a ‘symbol of white supremacy’

Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker has reiterated his call to remove the Confederate battle emblem from his state’s flag. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the wake of racial violence over the weekend in Virginia, Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi renewed his call Monday to remove the Confederate battle emblem from his state’s flag.

The Republican senator advocated the change in light of the fact that an altered version of the Mississippi flag was displayed Saturday during the neo-Nazi rally in the central Virginia city of Charlottesville, The (Jackson) Clarion-Ledger reported.

Las Vegas Man Arrested for Heller Burglary, Threat
Said in note, ‘If I’m going to die so are you’

Richard Holley faces charges of burglary, extortion, and intimidating a public officer. (Las Vegas Metro Police Department)

A 62-year-old man was arrested Monday in relation to a threatening message for Nevada Sen. Dean Heller over his vote on the Republican health care bill. 

Richard Holley was arrested and booked at the Clark County Detention Center on charges related to a July 16 burglary at the senator’s office, where police found a note threatening Heller's life, the Las Vegas Review Journal reported.

Opinion: Will Move to Purge Ohio Voting Rolls Kickstart Congressional Action?
Justice Department no ally on civil rights issue

Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., recounts his experience in Selma, Alabama, to a group of students gathered on the House steps on April 15, 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Fifty-two years ago this week, John Lewis of Georgia was a young activist, not the Democratic congressman he is today. Yet he got a warmer welcome from the then-president of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, than from today’s occupant of the White House.

On the Twitter feed of the longtime member of the U.S. House of Representatives, you can see a picture celebrating that time a few decades ago, when, with Democratic and Republican support, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed and then signed.

Former Rep. Chaka Fattah Appeals Prison Sentence
Lawyers lean on Supreme Court precedent to narrow corruption definition

Ex-Rep. Chaka Fattah is currently serving a 10-year prison sentence in Pennsylvania. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Chaka Fattah, who was convicted of racketeering in 2016, is looking to other politicians charged with corruption for inspiration as he appeals his 10-year prison sentence.

Specifically, the Philadelphia Democrat is hoping a recent Supreme Court decision used by politicians to successfully appeal corruption sentences will also work in his favor, the Philadephia Tribune reported.

Pence’s History as Media Shield Advocate May Be at Odds With Justice Department
Vice president spoke of importance of free press and the First Amendment

Vice President Mike Pence authored multiple versions of media shield legislation while serving in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

“The Constitution of the United States reads in part that Congress shall make no law abridging freedom of the press. This freedom represents a bedrock of our democracy by ensuring the free flow of information to the public. But, sadly, this freedom is under attack.”

Those were the words of a Republican congressman from Indiana, spoken on the House floor on March 14, 2006, proposing federal legislation to protect journalists, or a media shield.

New House Art Contest Controversy Swirls
Finalist’s painting depicts Statue of Liberty as a Muslim woman

Members of the group We The People Rising posted a video of their meeting with Rep. Lou Correa’s staff asking that a controversial painting in the annual House student art competition be removed from his district office. (We the People Rising via YouTube)

A new congressional art competition controversy is swirling around California Rep. Lou Correa after his office selected a painting of the Statue of Liberty depicted as a Muslim woman.

We the People Rising, a group that advocates stricter enforcement of immigration, is arguing that the picture hanging in Correa’s district office in Santa Ana as a finalist for the annual competition is a violation of separation of church and state, the Orange County Register reported.

Corrine Brown Gets Hearing Over ‘Holy Spirit’ Appeal
Seeks to overturn fraud conviction over bogus charity

Former Congresswoman Corrine Brown, center, is escorted to the Federal Courthouse in Jacksonville, Fla., in May during her trial on federal fraud and tax charges. (Bob Self/The Florida Times-Union via AP file photo)

Former Florida Rep. Corrine Brown will be in court Monday for a hearing about attempts to overturn her being found guilty on fraud charges.

Brown was found guilty on charges of fraudulently using money from a bogus charity for personal reasons in May.

Senators Seek to Protect Mueller From Trump
Work will take place to reconcile two bills over recess

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III has broad support among senators. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

What’s the best way to keep President Donald Trump from firing special counsel Robert S. Mueller III? Senators and their staffs on both sides of the aisle will be trying to figure that out over the next few weeks.

Sen. Chris Coons hopes lawmakers will come together quickly to craft a bill to provide Mueller with some insulation from Trump. The Delaware Democrat is the lead co-sponsor on a bill introduced by North Carolina Republican Thom Tillis that would create a right of action for a special counsel to seek legal recourse in the event of a firing.

Trump Backs GOP Immigration Bill, but Rift Within Party Widens
Senate’s No. 2 Republican sees ‘opportunity’ for Congress amid WH ‘chaos’

Activists demonstrate in Washington against President Donald Trump’s immigration policies in May. On Wednesday, Trump threw his backing behind new immigration legislation by Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday waded into the politically choppy waters of immigration law alongside two fellow Republicans, but the brief image of party unity failed to completely obscure a growing rift with other GOP senators.

Trump hosted Republican Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and and David Perdue of Georgia, a longtime ally, at the White House to discuss their legislation that would impose a skills-based criteria on individuals hoping to obtain U.S. citizenship. It was a moment of Republican comity after weeks of slowly increasing tensions between Trump and the Senate GOP conference.

Trump Makes Russia Sanctions Law, Then Savages Congress
President takes swipe at Senate Republicans after signing bipartisan bill

Despite his calls for warmer relations with the Kremlin, President Trump on Wednesday signed a bill slapping new sanctions on Russia. It also puts new penalties on North Korea and Iran. (Wikimedia Commons)

President Donald Trump signed bipartisan legislation slapping new sanctions on Russia, Iran and North Korea — then harshly criticized the legislation and the 517 lawmakers who voted for it.

Trump’s words reveal anew his growing irritation at Republican lawmakers’ inability to pass legislation he prefers and Democrats’ unwillingness to help. A statement issued by the White House after he signed the sanctions bill includes this line: “Congress could not even negotiate a healthcare bill after seven years of talking.”