Curtis Denies Protecting Police Chief Accused of Sexual Misconduct
Provo chief John King was forced out of office last year after he was accused of assaulting a volunteer

Rep. John Curtis, R-Utah, denied knowing about sexual harassment claims against Provo’s former police chief. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Utah Rep. John Curtis is denying charges that he ignored sexual harassment complaints about Provo’s former police chief.

Curtis, who was mayor of Provo before his election to the House last year, sent a statement Wednesday to media outlets in response to a lawsuit filed the day before, according to The Salt Lake Tribune.

Donor Testifies About Stockman Misspending His Contribution to Charity
FBI agent details where money went in former congressman’s corruption trial

Former Rep. Steve Stockman, R-Texas, right, is accused of misusing charitable donations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Steve Stockman misused money he had solicited from a wealthy conservative donor, spending none of it on the charity for which it was intended, according to testimony heard this week.

Richard Uihlein testified Wednesday in the former Texas Republican congressman’s federal corruption trial that his donation was to go to renovate a Washington, D.C., home for young conservatives, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Trump v. Biden? President and Former VP Lobby for a Fistfight
Burr and Hamilton used guns in 1804

President Donald Trump on Thursday tweeted he would put former Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., “down” in a fist fight they both appear to want. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Forget a debate. President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. want to throw down with their fists.

Back in 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr and political rival Alexander Hamilton chose to settle their deep differences in perhaps the most American way, with guns. But Biden and Trump want to face off in an even more old-school way, by throwing hands.

With Omnibus, Trump Learning You Can’t Always Get What You Want
White House priorities reflected, but not some of the premier asks

Speaker Paul D. Ryan glances toward President Donald Trump during a Feb. 28 ceremony for the late Rev. Billy Graham at the Capitol. (Aaron P. Bernstein/Reuters/Pool file photo)

Lawmakers defied President Donald Trump by excluding many of his demands in an emerging government spending bill. But the measure is not a complete loss for the commander in chief despite the late-game lobbying needed to secure his always tenuous support.

By mid-afternoon Wednesday, as lawmakers were saying final negotiations were underway, Trump’s signature was not yet certain. White House aides had gone silent on the matter, usually a sign the boss is unhappy. But the president signed off on the omnibus spending deal during an afternoon meeting with Speaker Paul D. Ryan, according to a Republican leadership source familiar with the meeting.

Prosecutor: Stockman Ran a ‘Massive Scam’
Defense emphasizes Stockman’s humble living and says he just lost track of finances

Former Rep. Steve Stockman, R-Texas, seated, is accused of funneling charitable donations for personal use. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Texas Rep. Steve Stockman was accused by a federal prosecutor in his corruption trial of running a “massive scam” in which he funneled charitable donations for his campaign and personal use and lied about it.

The former Texas Republican congressman’s trial began on Monday.

Senate Opts Against Limiting Trump’s War Powers
Measure to cease most military actions in Yemen shot down

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, here at a rally at the Capitol last year, pushed a resolution to end most U.S. military operations in Yemen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Amid a whirlwind day of White House news, President Donald Trump on Tuesday retained the expanded war powers he inherited from his post-9/11 predecessors, as the Senate shot down a measure that would have ordered him to cease most U.S. military operations in Yemen.

Trump scored a victory on behalf of the executive branch’s ability to launch and sustain military operations in new countries without first getting authorization from Congress. Amid pressure from Republican leaders, the White House and the Pentagon, the chamber killed a resolution, 55-44, offered by a bipartisan group of senators that would have required Trump to cease all U.S. military action against groups other than al-Qaida in Yemen.

Student Suspended After Call to Amodei’s Office
Came during the nationwide student walkout over gun violence last week

A high school student was suspended after making a call to the office of Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A student from Reno is saying his civil liberties were violated after he was suspended from his high school after calling Nevada Rep. Mark Amodei.

Noah Christiansen called his congressman’s office last week while students across the country walked out of classes in support of gun control, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

Supreme Court Justices Make Their Own Security Choices, Documents Reveal
Watchdog group says domestic travel policy should be tightened

The sun sets on the U.S. Supreme Court, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 03/14/18 at 11:06 a.m. | Supreme Court justices only get security protection during domestic trips outside the Washington metropolitan area when they request it, according to a U.S. Marshals Service policy unveiled Wednesday by a court watchdog group.

Fix the Court, a nonpartisan group that advocates accountability and transparency at the Supreme Court, obtained the security policy and hundreds of pages of related records through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit. The documents are an official and more detailed peek inside a security arrangement that gives justices broad discretion when it comes to their protection.

Sessions Not Plotting Crackdown on March Madness Pools
Perhaps thanks to Auburn and Alabama making the big dance

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is looking forward to having Auburn and Alabama playing in the NCAA tournament. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Enforcement actions against office March Madness pools will not be a priority for the Justice Department this year, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Monday.

“Well, Alabama and Auburn both got in, so we’re not suing them right now,” Sessions told radio host Hugh Hewitt when asked about the potential of federal lawsuits against “bracketologists.”

Trump Intensifies War on California’s Immigrant ‘Sanctuaries’
So far, little to show for effort to crack down on illegal immigration

Protesters arrive at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles during a march on Feb. 28. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

The legal struggle over immigrant “sanctuaries” is escalating, and deep-blue California is ground zero.

“This is basically going to war,” Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown said after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced last week that the Trump administration is suing the state over three recently enacted laws limiting local and state law enforcement cooperation with federal immigration agents.