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Batter Up! The 9th Congressional Women's Softball Game in Photos
The June 21 event as captured by Roll Call's photographer

Rep. Kathy Castor, D-Fla., bats in the Congressional Women’s Softball Game on Wednesday that pits members of Congress against female journalists at Watkins Recreation Center on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The press team prevailed 2-1 in this year’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game that pits journalists against members of Congress. It’s the ninth annual such event. Bipartisanship was on full display more then ever this year, Alex Gangitano reports, at an event where members from both sides of the aisle have traditionally played on the same team.

The game benefits the Young Survival Coalition that helps young women with breast cancer.

Press Beats Members at Congressional Women's Softball Game, to Record Crowd
The Bad News Babes win 2-1 over the members' team

Capitol Police officer Crystal Griner throws out the first pitch in the Congressional Women’s Softball game on Wednesday at Watkins Recreation Center on Capitol Hill. Griner was injured in last week’s shooting at the Republican baseball practice. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Between the large crowds, record-breaking fundraising, a heroic first pitch, bipartisanship throughout the stadium and the game itself, it was hard to pinpoint just one takeaway at Wednesday’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game.

The press team, known as the Bad News Babes, won the ninth annual game, 2-1, against the members of Congress.

Balancing the First Amendment and Students’ Safety
Senate panel discusses free speech on college campuses

UNITED STATES — Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., took part in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the issue of free speech on college campuses. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Zachary Wood arrived at Williams College his freshman year, he had high hopes for an academic environment that challenged his views. Now going into his senior year, Wood says he has faced backlash from students and administrators for inviting controversial speakers to campus.

Wood appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, part of a panel discussing free speech on college campuses.

Scalise’s Team Tweets Support for Handel
Joins Trump in Election Day boost in Georgia House race

Republican candidate for Georgia's 6th Congressional district Karen Handel received support from House Majority Whip Steve Scalise's political team. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As House Majority Whip Steve Scalise continues to recover from the shooting at the Republican baseball practice last week, his campaign team sent its support to the Republican candidate in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District race.

Scalise’s political team’s Twitter account tweeted Karen Handel is “a great candidate” and that “#TeamScalise is pulling for her.”

It’s Election Day in the Most Expensive House Race Ever
Both sides in Georgia special election working to turn out Tuesday vote

Jon Ossoff, Democratic candidate for Georgia’s 6th Congressional district, shakes hands with campaign workers and volunteers at his campaign office in Chamblee, Ga., on Sunday. Ossoff is facing off against Republican Karen Handel in the special election to fill the seat vacated by current HHS Secretary Tom Price on Tuesday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

SANDY SPRINGS, Ga. — It’s finally here. Voters go to the polls Tuesday in the most expensive House race in the country. 

In the final hours of the special election campaign in Georgia’s 6th District, both Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff are sticking to a variation of the same talking point: “It’s all about turnout.” 

Book Explores How Lobbyists Fill a Void in Congress
“It’s not who you know, it’s what you know”

In their new book “Revolving Door Lobbying,” Timothy LaPira and Herschel Thomas look at the connections between federal government service and lucrative lobbyist careers. (Courtesy University Press of Kansas)

If you bemoan lobbyists or the revolving door that spins between government service and K Street, blame Congress.

The shift on Capitol Hill to centralize much of the major policymaking in leadership offices, as opposed to committees, along with a reduction in legislative staff and their salaries has helped propel the revolving door in recent years, says Timothy LaPira, a James Madison University professor.

Perry Postpones Town Hall After Shooting
Pennsylvania Republican says he made decision after discussions with law enforcement

Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., speaks during a news conference on delaying of the Affordable Care Act's employer mandate at the Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republican Rep. Scott Perry has postponed a town hall meeting scheduled for Saturday as a result of security concerns raised by the Wednesday shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and four others.

“In light of Wednesday's attack, continued security concerns, extensive and myriad discussions with law enforcement and other officials, I’ve decided to postpone our town hall meeting on Saturday,”  The York Dispatch reported Perry said in a statement late Thursday.

Poll: Most Think Trump Interfered With Russia Investigation
As Trump calls the investigation ‘phony’

A new poll shows that nearly 70 percent of those surveyed are moderately or very concerned about possible ties between President Donald Trump and Russia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most Americans think President Donald Trump has attempted to interfere with the investigation into his campaign’s ties to Russia and possible Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to a new poll from The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Other results that don’t bode well for Trump: Just one in five Americans support his firing of James Comey as FBI director, 68 percent are moderately to very concerned about possible Trump ties to Russia, and only three in 10 say they aren’t very concerned.

Sessions Declines to Testify About Any Conversations With Trump About Russia
Says potential exists for an executive privilege claim that has not happened

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is greeted by Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.), right, and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., before his testimony on Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

BY JOHN T. BENNETT AND NIELS LESNIEWSKI, CQ ROLL CALL

Attorney General Jeff Sessions declined to answer questions Tuesday about conversations with President Donald Trump, citing the potential that the White House could assert executive privilege — which has not yet happened.

Sessions to Testify in Public Hearing on Tuesday
Attorney general follows explosive Comey testimony before Intelligence panel

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has recused himself from the investigation into possible ties between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions will testify Tuesday in an open hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee for its ongoing probe into Russia’s interference in last year’s presidential election.

The public hearing was announced Monday by Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr and Vice Chairman Mark Warner.