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Trump Is ‘Very Supportive’ of Senate Health Care Bill
President breaks silence after spokeswoman signaled hands-off approach

President Donald Trump threw his support behind the Senate GOP’s health care bill on Thursday evening. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump tweeted Thursday evening that he is “very supportive” of the health care bill crafted by Senate Republican leadership, departing from an earlier more cautious approach by his White House communications team.

The president’s support for the bill — which proposes Medicaid cuts, and an end to the 2010 health care law’s individual mandate — comes as Senate leaders must win over several conservative senators who on Thursday announced they have concerns with the measure. It is unclear whether Trump’s support will help bring those conservatives on board.

Embattled AG Sessions Gets Vote of Confidence from Pence
VP: Trump administration trying to ‘make this country safe again’

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, is seen with Vice President Mike Pence, second from left, and senators in the Capitol’s Old Senate Chamber in February. On Wednesday, Pence said he and President Trump are “proud” to have the former Alabama senator as attorney general. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday gave a vote of confidence to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who is engulfed in the Russia controversy hovering over the Trump presidency.

The VP hailed Sessions as a “law and order attorney general,” and said he and Trump are “proud to have him on our side.”

Ryan, Pence Promise Tax Overhaul but Offer Few Details
Speaker, vice president ramp up rhetoric on taxes

Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, pictured together before President Donald Trump’s address to Congress in February, spoke about overhauling the tax code during a National Association of Manufacturers summit Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday reiterated a commitment to overhauling the tax code this year but offered no new details on how they plan to do so. 

In separate addresses to a National Association of Manufacturers summit, Ryan and Pence said 2017 is the year Congress will rework the tax system. 

Scalise Will Need More Surgery, But His Condition Has Improved
Trump said Scalise was in 'much more difficult' condition than first thought

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., pictured in May at a news conference in the Capitol is in “some trouble” at a Washington hospital after being shot on Wednesday, President Trump said. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

BY JOHN T. BENNETT AND NIELS LESNIEWSKI, CQ ROLL CALL

Updated 8:35 p.m. | House Majority Whip Steve Scalise could be hospitalized for some time as he is treated for the effects of a gunshot wound.

That is according to an update Thursday evening from MedStar Washington Hospital Center, where doctors predicted the Louisiana Republican will need more surgery.

Democrats Decry ‘Legislative Malpractice’ on Health Care
GOP cites seven-year repeal effort as justification for current process

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is throwing Republicans’ prior statements about health care back at them. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats on Tuesday continued to assail how Republican leaders are crafting legislation to overhaul the U.S. health care system, calling it “legislative malpractice,” and are using GOP leaders’ own statements from years past to make their point.  

While Republican members routinely criticize the manner in which Democrats passed the 2010 health care law on a strictly party-line vote, there are stark differences between that process and the current one.

Opinion: How a Textbook in 2067 Might View Donald Trump
Alternate history that the president didn’t make up

Shapiro invites readers to imagine how a history book from 50 years in the future might view President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Perspective is nearly impossible when you are living through tumultuous events on a daily basis. But by slightly bending the space-time continuum, this column has exclusively obtained a copy of a 2067 tenth-grade American history textbook entitled “Many Peoples, Many Voices, Many Perspectives.”Turning to the chapter on America after the 2016 election, it was fascinating to discover with 50 years hindsight how everything turned out. Actually, because of a quirk in quantum physics, three versions of the chapter were provided with radically different outcomes. Some excerpts:

“...President Trump remained defiant throughout the early summer of 2017. He often rallied his supporters through a primitive form of messaging called Twitter (see “obsolete technologies” on Page 821). Republicans in Congress, fearing the wrath of Trump supporters, avoided a public break with the president, although many (see “Profiles in Courage” page 619) grumbled privately.

American Catholics Have an Ally in Trump, VP Says
Pence speaks at D.C. breakfast

Vice President Mike Pence told attendees at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast on Tuesday that Catholics “have an ally in President Donald Trump.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By GRIFFIN CONNOLLY and KYLE STEWART

Vice President Mike Pence denounced terrorism in the Middle East and championed President Donald Trump’s early anti-abortion initiatives in an address Tuesday at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast in Washington.

‘Climate Change’ a Third-Rail Phrase for Trump
President, top aides mum as U.S. exits Paris Agreement

In his address Thursday, President Donald Trump cited jobs and other countries “laughing at” America among his reasons for pulling the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord. But he never said he doesn’t think climate change is real. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump uttered nearly 3,000 words Thursday explaining why he withdrew the United States from the Paris climate accord. But he never spoke the two words the global agreement was designed to combat: climate change.

While candidate Trump dubbed climate change a “hoax” and “bulls---,” senior White House officials are mum about whether President Trump still thinks that. On Friday morning, senior White House aides, including counselor Kellyanne Conway, declined to answer questions about the president’s personal beliefs on climate change during television interviews.

GOP Leaders Careful on Response to Gianforte Assault Charges
Trump, Pence remain mum on incident

Montana Republican candidate Greg Gianforte was cited for misdemeanor assault of a reporter Wednesday night, a day before the special election for the state’s lone House seat. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And REMA RAHMAN

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan became the first Republican leader to address Montana GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte’s alleged assault on a reporter, saying, “There’s never a call for physical assault.”

Annual Capitol Insiders Survey: The Trump Effect
Tensions on the Hill from last year have carried over into 2017

Republicans staffers on Capitol Hill are still not comfortable with President Donald Trump, the latest Capitol Insiders Survey finds. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last year’s election was humbling for pollsters, and the Capitol Insiders Survey was no exception. The vast majority of congressional staffers surveyed by CQ Roll Call in the days before the election — 91 percent — predicted a Hillary Clinton win. Only 6 percent thought Donald Trump could pull it off.

Still, the results reflect how Trump’s win blindsided the Washington establishment. The majority of Republican aides said consistently during the campaign that they wouldn’t vote for Trump.