nancy-pelosi

Rep. French Hill Follows Trend, Tying Democratic Opponent to Pelosi, Clinton in New Ad
State Rep. Clarke Tucker on DCCC's Red to Blue list

Rep. French Hill, R-Ark., is airing ads this week attacking his Democratic opponent for ostensible ties to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. French Hill is following the lead of other vulnerable Republicans in 2018 in a new ad targeting his Democratic opponent for supposedly aligning with Hillary Clinton and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Hill, who represents Arkansas’ 2nd District, began airing ads on television this week in which a narrator declares that his opponent in the general election, state Rep. Clarke Tucker, is a “Hillary Clinton-supporting Democrat for higher taxes and bigger government.”

Analysis: Steve Bannon Is Right About the Midterms — Until He Isn’t
Midterms are rarely about choices, mostly about the incumbent party

Former White House adviser Steve Bannon, here with senior White House aide Kellyanne Conway at President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017, has a strategy for the midterms that is all about placing the president up front. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Trump campaign chief executive and White House strategist Steve Bannon recently told CNN’s Fareed Zakaria that the midterm elections will be “an up or down vote” on the president. He also asserted that it’s imperative that Donald Trump nationalize the midterm elections.

“Trump’s second presidential race will be on Nov. 6 of this year. He’s on the ballot, and we’re going to have an up or down vote. Do you back Trump’s program, OK, with all that’s good and all that’s bad? Do you back Trump’s program, or do you back removing him?” Bannon told Zakaria.

Democrats Excoriate Trump After Death Toll Revelations in Puerto Rico
White House and GOP lawmakers mum on Harvard study of Hurricane Maria’s toll

Democrats renewed their criticism Tuesday of President Donald Trump’s response to the crisis in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats expressed outrage at President Donald Trump on Tuesday and Wednesday as they reacted to a new Harvard study that estimates at least 4,645 people died in Puerto Rico as a result of Hurricane Maria.

That figure is 73 times greater than the government’s most recently reported death toll: 64.

Analysis: Pelosi, Clinton Factor Big in Trump’s Midterm Strategy
President tries to lend a hand in Senate race that Democrat leads over GOP’s Blackburn

President Donald Trump arrives for a rally at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium for a rally for GOP Senate candidate Rep. Marsha Blackburn. Polls indicate a tight race with former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump showed a few cards in his midterm election hand Tuesday night, trying to attach a competitive Democratic Senate candidate to Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton in a state he easily won.

The Republican president did call his party’s candidate for the Senate seat being vacated by GOP Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, “a great woman.” And he brought her on stage to say a few words, during which she opted to praise him. But for the most part, Trump’s message in Nashville was all about Trump, in a preview of the rallies he plans across the country where close races will decide which party controls the House and Senate for the rest of his current term.

3 Ways Nancy Pelosi Won’t Be Speaker Next Year
GOP could well lose the boogeywoman who keeps its base energized

There are at least three scenarios in which House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi won’t become speaker again, Gonzales writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nancy Pelosi is a drug that Republicans just can’t quit, and the GOP hopes that the threat of her becoming speaker of the House again will awaken any potentially apathetic base voters. While that might work for Republicans for yet another cycle, it might be the last cycle with their favorite boogeywoman, considering there are at least three scenarios in which the California Democrat won’t regain the leadership mantle.

Given the presence of a polarizing President Donald Trump in the White House and historical midterm trends, falling short of a majority in November would be a catastrophe for Democrats.

Green Peeved at Pelosi for ‘Trivializing’ Democrats’ Impeachment Pleas
Texas congressman and some colleagues want to impeach Trump over policies ‘based on his bigotry’

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, took issue with what he saw as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s “reducing the President’s harmful bigotry to his ‘being a jerk.’” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Al Green took issue with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi for downplaying some Democrats’ efforts to impeach President Donald Trump.

Green and at least a few dozen of his other House Democratic colleagues have spearheaded an effort to impeach the president over policies “based on his bigotry,” such as a ban on entry to the United States for citizens of majority-Muslim countries and the rollback of a program to protect immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children but who have grown up here.

How Ryan and Pelosi Are Kicking Themselves to the Curb (Sort Of)
Removing modest perks for ex-speakers is good politics but enfeebles the speakership

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Speaker Paul D. Ryan are of one mind when it comes to post-speaker perks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Incredible Shrinking Speakership is going to get just a little bit smaller.

The Constitution makes speakers unassailable as presiding officer in the House. Chamber rules vest the job with plenty of responsibility. And federal law places them second in the line of presidential succession.

Hoyer Fine With Cárdenas Remaining in Leadership While Abuse Allegations Investigated
Democratic whip says his view would be different if Cárdenas were in a role where he spoke for the party

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., are not calling on Rep. Tony Cardenas to step down from his leadership position amid child sex abuse allegations raised against him that he denies. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer does not believe that Tony Cárdenas needs to step down from his leadership role over allegations that he sexually abused a 16-year-old girl in 2007 when he was serving on the Los Angeles City Council.

Cárdenas, who has denied the allegations raised against him in a lawsuit filed last month, serves in an elected leadership position House Democrats created in 2016 for a member serving for five terms or less to have a seat at the leadership table. The California Democrat is the highest-ranking lawmaker to be accused of sexual misconduct to date.

Pelosi Confident on Possible Speakership, Won’t Speculate on Minority Scenario
On some Democrats’ calls for new leadership: ‘If they have to do that to win the election, I’m all for winning’

“I can't even think of not winning” control of the House in November, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, told a Washington audience on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi expressed confidence Tuesday in her ability to be elected speaker if Democrats retake the majority in November but wouldn’t say whether she’d stick around and run for minority leader if they fall short of that goal.

“I can’t even think of not winning,” the California Democrat said at a Politico Playbook event. “And you have to believe.”

3 Ways In Which the House Chaplain Controversy May Continue
Lawmakers still want answers about the speaker’s decision to fire Rev. Patrick J. Conroy

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy is staying is position but lawmakers are still questioning why he was asked to leave in the first place. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy is getting to stay in his position, but that doesn’t mean the controversy surrounding Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s initial decision to fire him is going away. 

Several lawmakers are still questioning what influenced the Wisconsin Republican to make his call and how to prevent future speakers from unilaterally seeking to remove the House chaplain.