nancy-pelosi

With Spending Deal Close, Trump Lambasts Democrats
Pelosi: Trump ‘projecting his own bad intentions’ in his Twitter rants

President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Thursday to blast Democrats just as the negotiations on a government funding bill are entering the most serious phase. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With less than 48 hours to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump on Thursday voiced his opposition to including in a government funding bill two items that are vitally important for Democrats.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi reiterated Thursday morning that Democrats want a still-emerging spending measure for the rest of fiscal 2017 to include funds for financially struggling Puerto Rico. Democrats also say they have secured an agreement from the Trump administration to continue paying subsidies to health insurers — though Trump officials say those payments will not necessarily continue permanently.

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

GOP Super PAC Ties Montana's Rob Quist to Nancy Pelosi
Congressional Leadership Fund begins $800,000 media campaign

Screenshot

As national attention turns to the special election in Montana, the super PAC backed by House GOP leadership is deploying House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in a new TV attack on Democratic nominee Rob Quist. 

The ad, which will debut Friday on broadcast and cable, marks the start of an $800,000 media buy from Congressional Leadership Fund. The super PAC ran its first TV ad against Quist last month, using many of the same attacks.  

Taunting Trump: Pelosi Challenges POTUS to Prove Claims
Top House Democrat lobs criticisms at get-out-of-town presser

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi slammed President Donald Trump for making unsubstantiated claims against officials in his predecessor’s administration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As the House prepared to skip town for its two-week April recess, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi used her get-out-of-town news conference to needle Republicans, in particular President Donald Trump, for unsubstantiated claims against senior Obama administration officials.

“How low can he go?” the California Democrat asked rhetorically.

Opinion: Not So Fast, Democrats. You Had a Good Day, but Now What?
Party needs to focus on a clear message

Democratic leaders such as Charles E. Schumer and Nancy Pelosi may be celebrating the GOP’s recent health care debacle, but they need to focus on making sure that Americans know what they stand for, Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the Republican Party has learned, it’s much easier to be the party of “no” than to actually have a plan to lead. So while Democrats are celebrating a GOP in disarray, the party out of power needs a message and a plan.

Understandably, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosicelebrated as the GOP’s new-and-improved health care plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act failed. But long term, she must truly want to experience a return to the speaker’s post. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer knows just how to rile Donald Trump, his fellow New Yorker. But he still has to call Trump Mr. President.

Why Committee Chairmen Should Be Concerned About Trump
White House has sent veiled warnings to appropriators, tax writers and authorizers

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., holds a news conference in the Capitol last Wednesday. The embattled chairman’s recent actions offer a cautionary tale for his colleagues. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | For Republican committee chairmen, House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes has had a month that amounts to a cautionary tale.

One day, you can be the respected chairman of one of the last remaining bipartisan committees on Capitol Hill. A few weeks later, your ranking member is calling for you to step aside from the most important probe the panel has done in years. Such is life for Republican committee chairmen in the Trump era.

How The GOP’s Health Care Law Went Down
A play-by-play of one of the most momentous days in Trump’s presidency

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., approaches the podium to make a statement and take questions from reporters after he pulled the Republican bill to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It was a nail-biter of a day with a photo finish.

The Republican Party’s seven-year effort to repeal the 2010 health care law ended with a thud Friday when the GOP decided not to even subject its do-or-die alternative to a vote.

Opinion: Are Republicans Storming the Castle or Walking the Plank on Health Care?
Upcoming health care vote could have consequences for 2018

Rep. Mark Meadows, chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, was singled out by President Donald Trump at Tuesday’s House GOP conference meeting for not yet voicing his support for the Republican health care plan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans are getting leaned on, hard, to vote for the GOP health care bill. First came the invitations to the White House Bowling Alley. Then the lunch dates. Still hunting for votes over the weekend, President Donald Trump flew members to Mar-a-Lago. But by Tuesday, with a floor vote looming, President Trump was naming names at the GOP caucus meeting. “Mark Meadows?” the president said, looking for the leader of the Freedom Caucus, who has still not said he’ll vote for the bill. “Stand up, Mark. … Mark, I’m going to come after you.”

The White House later said that the president was “just having fun” at the caucus meeting. But when a White House goes into full whip mode, which this White House obviously has, it’s time for the members on the sharp side of the whip to ask themselves whether they’re being asked to storm the castle or walk the plank. In other words, will their vote on health care this week help deliver a successful, necessary legislative victory, or are they being asked to support a bill that may not pass, may not work, or may cost them and their party their seats in two years’ time.

Ep. 45: Inside the GOP’s Uphill Health Bill Battle
The Big Story

CQ Roll Call’s health editor Rebecca Adams breaks down why the Republican replacement for Obamacare is being attacked on all sides. And senior editor David Hawkings talks about the political consequences of the GOP’s current predicament.

Under Pressure, Sessions Recuses Himself From Campaign Inquiries
AG says he reached decision after meeting with DOJ ethics officials

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was commended by Republicans for his decision but Democrats reiterated their calls for him to resign. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday recused himself from any investigation related to the 2016 U.S. election, including into alleged ties between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russian officials. 

Sessions’ announcement comes less than 24 hours after The Washington Post reported that the former Alabama senator spoke twice during the presidential campaign with Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States. Sessions, who served as a senior Trump adviser during the campaign, did not disclose those meetings at his confirmation hearing, despite being asked whether he had any contacts with Russian officials.