nancy-pelosi

Pelosi Pledges to Use ‘Every Avenue’ Against Trump
House Democrats file censure of president over Charlottesville response

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi praised a resolution filed by House Democrats that aims to censure the president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi pledged on Friday to use “every avenue” to challenge President Donald Trump after three House Democrats filed a resolution condemning how the president responded to the violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The censure resolution denounces Trump for not immediately and specifically condemning neo-Nazi and white nationalist groups who took part in the protest and then doubling down on his comments days later, saying some of the far-right protesters were “very fine people.”

Opinion: Trump’s Two-Front War Against McConnell and North Korea
And why Democrats are in no position to laugh

It may not be long before President Donald Trump starts portraying Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as almost as much of a villain as Kim Jong Un, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool file photo)

If we survive the tweets of August, a Wall Street Journal headline should be immortalized as a symbol of this long hot summer in Trumpland. In the online edition of Friday’s Journal, the subhead on a stock-picking article actually read: “Analysts are trying to work out what happens to the markets they cover in the event of an all-out nuclear war.”

Here’s my personal stock tip for the apocalypse: Invest in personal hygiene companies like Procter & Gamble since we will need plenty of deodorant in our crowded fallout shelters.

Take Five: Ro Khanna
California Democrat recalls lessons learned from political rival and mentor

California Rep. Ro Khanna knocked on doors for former President Barack Obama’s 1996 state Senate campaign in Illinois. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Rep. Ro Khanna, 40, a California Democrat, talks about campaigning for President Barack Obama, getting mentored by former Rep. Tom Lantos, and his grandfather’s role in the independence movement in India.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

Opinion: Democrats Cut the Cards in Search of a Better Deal
Sending a message to Joe Sixpack

From left, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rhode Island Rep. David Cicilline, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján, Virginia Sen. Mark Warner and Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos at the congressional Democrats’ rally in Berryville, Va., on Monday to unveil their new economic agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Under the bright sun in Berryville, Virginia, Monday afternoon, the congressional Democrats demonstrated that they can change. Or, at least, they can paper over their differences.

At the beginning of an hourlong rollout of their 2018 economic agenda, “A Better Deal,” Chuck Schumer labeled as a “false choice” the debate over “whether Democrats should spend all our energy focusing on the diverse Obama coalition or the blue-collar Americans in the heartland who voted for Trump.”

Democrats Cast Wide Net in Shaping ‘Better Deal’ Platform
DCCC spent seven months working on agenda and talking to stakeholders

New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján chairs the DCCC, whose staff have worked to find consensus on an economic message for the Democratic Party. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats are set to unveil their “Better Deal” agenda Monday afternoon. Over the past seven months, the House Democrats’ campaign arm has sought to foster unity around an economically focused agenda through meetings with stakeholders and conversations with voters.

The goal for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee was to create a unifying message on the economy and jobs that could also be tailored to an individual congressional district. The party is looking to flip at least 24 seats next year to win back the House.

Pelosi Criticizes GOP For Rushing Intel Authorization Without Debate
Pelosi says bill is not the problem, but putting it on suspension calendar is

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called Republican leadership’s move to rush the intelligence authorization bill “unacceptable.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

100 Years of Women: Here's How Many Have Served in Congress
A look at the century since Montana's Jeannette Rankin joined the House

Reps. Nancy Johnson, R-Conn., right, and Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, with the portrait of Jeannette Rankin of Montana, who was the first woman elected to Congress in 1916, taking office in 1917. An unveiling ceremony for her portrait is shown in this file photo in the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress on Sept. 29, 2005. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

When women’s rights advocate Jeannette Rankin, a Montana Republican, was elected to the House of Representatives a century ago, she noted, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.”

Rankin took office in 1917 — a member of the 65th Congress. Since that time, 281 women have been elected full voting members of the House and 50 have become senators. 

Opinion: No Need to Be Up in Arms Over House Dress Code
Proper attire shows respect for institution, its people and work being done

As recent speakers, Paul D. Ryan and Nancy Pelosi have been responsible for enforcing rules governing attire in and around the House floor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Thank God for the House dress code: If it were up to the general public, the rules might require reporters to be attired in sackcloth and ashes or tar and feathers.

By now, you’ve probably heard that Speaker Paul Ryan is taking heat because a female reporter was kicked out of the area adjacent to the House floor — the Speaker’s Lobby — when her outfit didn’t meet the standards laid out in the House rules. Apparently, like Michelle Obama and Melania Trump, she dared to bare arms.

How House Leaders Spend Independence Day Recess
McCarthy, Hoyer attend Capitol Fourth concert, Ryan participates in parades back home

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, pictured prepping for the 2017 inauguration, are spending most of the Independence Day recess in their districts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The No. 2 House Republican and Democratic leaders spent Independence Day in Washington at the Capitol Fourth celebration, while the top House leaders were participating in parades and spending time with family.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan participated in two parades this July Fourth, in Oak Creek and Franklin in Wisconsin, and he will be touring local businesses in his 1st District over the next couple of days, his spokesman Brendan Buck said. 

What’s Ohio’s Tim Ryan Up To?
Youngstown Democrat in media spotlight again — and on the trail

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan greets voters in South Carolina's 5th District, where he campaigned earlier this month for Democratic candidate Archie Parnell. (Simone Pathé/CQ Roll Call)

The weekend before South Carolina’s special election, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan had been thrown into the lion’s den — “literally,” he joked. 

As a surrogate for an under-the-radar Democratic candidate in the 5th District race, the congressman from Youngstown, Ohio, was addressing a Lions Club candidate forum in a gated community south of Charlotte, North Carolina, where the room was mostly white, elderly and Republican.