nationwide

Lawmakers Call for More Resources for Separated Migrant Children
Murray questions whether HHS can handle the situation

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said she was troubled by the lack of information from the administration about the children in its care. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers and public health groups on Thursday urged the Trump administration to commit more resources to the health needs of the immigrant children who have been separated from their families at the border.

Even as Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar visited the Texas-Mexico border with first lady Melania Trump, questions remained about whether the department has adequate funding to handle the situation and how much more might be needed.

Energy Panel Advances Bills to Support New Nuclear Plants
Bills will help maintain nuclear in the domestic electricity mix, lawmakers say

Michigan Rep. Fred Upton, who chairs the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy, says the bills will help establish a coherent and defined federal nuclear policy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A quartet of bills meant to ease the path to commercialization of new nuclear reactors moved out of a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee Thursday.

The bills are intended to speed up Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing for so-called advanced reactors, including smaller units, and to spur a domestic fuel supply. Lawmakers have proposed the bills as a way to help nuclear retain its place in a domestic electricity mix increasingly powered by natural gas and cheap renewable sources, such as wind and solar.

An Ex-Con Looks for a Comeback in New York’s 11th District
But first, Michael Grimm needs to defeat Rep. Dan Donovan in the GOP primary

Former Rep. Michael G. Grimm, R-N.Y., is challenging Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., for his old seat in New York’s 11th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been 90 years since someone with a criminal conviction was elected to the House. But one felon could jump-start his congressional comeback if he wins a Republican primary next week.

GOP voters in New York’s 11th District head to the polls Tuesday to choose between Rep. Dan Donovan and former Rep. Michael G. Grimm, who resigned his seat in early 2015 and served seven months in prison after pleading guilty to tax evasion.

Can Aruna Miller Upset the Largest Self-Funder in House Race History?
Maryland hopeful has many of the credentials that have boosted Democratic women this year

Maryland state Del. Aruna Miller greets voters at an early polling place in Gaithersburg, Md, on June 18. She stands behind the electioneering line which prevents a candidate from being too close to a voting site. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

GAITHERSBURG, Md. — If there’s one electoral trend from 2018 so far, it’s that Democratic women are winning primaries in House districts across the country.

But in Maryland, which has no women in its congressional delegation for the first time in more than 40 years, the most competitive woman running for the Democratic nomination in the open 6th District is at a big disadvantage.

Trump Administration Finalizes Rule on Health Plans
“You’re going to save massive amounts of money and have much better health care,” president says

Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta suggested the new rule on associate health plans would help ease regulatory burdens on small businesses. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration on Tuesday finalized a rule expanding the availability of alternative insurance plans that do not meet the 2010 health care law’s requirements despite objections from consumer advocates and the industry.

The rule will extend so-called association health plans, which allow insurance companies to skirt benefit requirements and other parts of the 2010 law. President Donald Trump heralded the new rule in a speech Tuesday to the National Federation of Independent Business trade group, or NFIB.

Judge Rules Ann Kirkpatrick Lives in Tucson, Can Stay on Primary Ballot
Arizona Democrat is seeking a comeback from 2nd District

Former Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick is seeking a comeback from Arizona’s 2nd District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Arizona Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick does live in Tucson, a judge ruled Tuesday in a lawsuit challenging her residency in the 2nd District. The lawsuit, financed by one of her Democratic primary opponents, had attempted to remove her from the primary ballot.

Former state Rep. Matt Heinz, the losing 2016 Democratic nominee for the seat, helped fund the lawsuit that alleged Kirkpatrick falsely claimed in campaign documents that she lived in Tucson. Candidates are not required to live in the districts they are running in, but the plaintiffs alleged Kirkpatrick violated state law that required candidates to accurately reflect their residency on nominating papers.

Fight Over Food Stamps Among Big Hurdles Facing Farm Bill
As a fall deadline looms, Congress keeps stewing and squabbling

A sprinkler irrigates farmland in Palmdale, Calif., on May 26. Lawmakers have two options as the farm bill nears expiration: reach a compromise or extend current law through an expected lame-duck session in late fall or into 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If everything goes according to plan this month, House leaders will round up the necessary Republican votes to pass the chamber’s 2018 farm bill after an unexpected defeat on the floor put the legislation on hold.

The failed May 18 vote marked the second time in five years that a farm bill ran into obstacles in the House. In the Senate, meanwhile, leaders have indicated they want to pass the bipartisan legislation by the July Fourth recess.

Congress’ Move to Leave Obamacare Mostly Intact May Save Law
Supporters, opponents of health care law unite on new brief

Five law professors argue in a brief that the Justice Department and 20 GOP-led states are wrong when they say other major provisions in the 2010 health care law must be struck down. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congress killed off a key penalty in the 2010 health care law last year but left the rest of the law intact — and that might prove pivotal to a lawsuit in which the Justice Department and 20 Republican-led states argue that the law’s other major provisions must now be struck down.

That’s because the federal courts will look at what Congress intended to accomplish regardless of what individual lawmakers wanted to do, according to a group of five law professors with deep experience in litigation over the health care law.

Opinion: My ‘Family Leave’ Was a Well-Timed Government Shutdown
Yes, I worked at the White House. But before all that, I am a father

Mothers protest at the Capitol during the government shutdown of 2013. For some new parents, the shutdown brought an unexpected chance to spend time with their children — but luck isn’t much of a family leave policy, Jenkins writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

This Father’s Day, I thought a lot about what it means to be a good father. You see, in my mind, I am a father first.

Yes, I worked at the White House. Yes, I now work for Will Ferrell’s Funny Or Die. Yes, I am a sad New York Mets fan. But before all of these things, I am a father. It’s the most important job I will ever have. Unfortunately, in today’s America, considering yourself a “father first” is not always expected by employers or society at large.

Opinion: Higher Education in America Finds Itself on a Slippery Slope
Our great research universities risk getting left behind

As support for our educational system becomes increasingly politicized, a significant number of people are now questioning the very worth of a higher education, Augustine writes. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

A decade ago I chaired a committee that was established on a bipartisan basis by members of the House and Senate to assess America’s future economic competitiveness. The committee’s 20 members included CEOs of Fortune 100 companies, former presidential appointees, presidents of major public and private universities and three Nobel laureates. Upon completion of our work, two of our members joined the then-president’s Cabinet, one as secretary of Energy and the other as secretary of Defense.

The document we produced, which became known as the “Gathering Storm Report,” concluded that the top two priorities for America to remain competitive in the global marketplace were to strengthen education and to double our investment in basic research.