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Capitol Ink | Taxsgiving Day

Trump Mentions Twitter Account With Pro-Roy Moore Posts
User has retweeted criticisms of GOP candidate’s accusers

President Trump with Chinese President Xi Jinping at a conference in Asia on Saturday. Trump said he has not learned about allegations against Roy Moore because he was busy with Xi and other leaders. (White House photo via Flickr)

One of the Twitter accounts President Donald Trump shared with his 42.7 million followers on Wednesday has posted regularly defending embattled Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore.

Back from his Asia trip for just a few hours, Trump rose early Wednesday morning and resumed his morning Twitter habit before 6 a.m. EST. He touted what he called in two tweets his “successful trip,” labeled CNN a “Loser!,” and thanked several followers who had praised him.

Anti-Harassment Training Mandated for House Members, Staffs
Paul Ryan makes announcement after two lawmakers recount incidents of sexual harassment

Speaker Paul D. Ryan says the House will adopt a policy of mandatory anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training for all members and their staffs. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House members and their staffs will now be required to take mandatory anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan made the announcement Tuesday afternoon, on the same day that Reps. Jackie Speier, a California Democrat, and Barbara Comstock, a Virginia Republican, recounted at a House Administration Committee hearing incidents of sexual harassment involving lawmakers.

Capitol Ink | Good Old Days

Capitol-Ink-11-14-17

Opinion: Realizing the Vision of Evidence-Based Policymaking
Congress should act quickly to pass new Ryan-Murray legislation

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Washington Sen. Patty Murray recently introduced legislation that implemented many of the recommendations of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Recently, amid the political turmoil over tax reform and other controversial issues, Congress set aside partisan differences to convey an important message to the American public: Better use of evidence in our policymaking process is necessary and possible.

Regardless of their politics, the American people want a government that operates effectively and transparently. The federal government spends billions on programs, yet often lacks the evidence needed to determine whether these programs are working as intended or how they could be improved. Evidence-based policymaking  — making better use of data and rigorous program evaluation to inform government decision-making —holds the key to driving government programs to be more effective.

Ready or Not, House Republicans Set Vote on Tax Overhaul
But floor delay remains a possibility as GOP leaders wrangle votes

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said the health care debate taught him not to set an “artificial deadline” for passing legislation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The scenario is all too familiar: House Republican leaders schedule a floor vote on a major legislative priority and exude confidence the bill will pass despite a chorus of rank-and-file concern. 

GOP leaders insist the tax overhaul they plan to vote on this week is different from the health care bill they had to pull from the floor this spring. But the reality is they are still wrangling the 218 votes needed to pass their tax measure. A possible repeat scenario of the health care debacle looms.

House Republicans Raise Red Flags Over Senate Tax Bill
Differences on estate tax, state and local tax deduction could cause issues

Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., has concerns about the Senate not repealing the estate tax and worries the House have to vote on the Senate version of the tax overhaul bill. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The tax overhaul bill the Senate released Thursday could create problems in negotiations with the House, given its divergence on key areas like the estate tax and the state and local tax deduction.

House conservatives are already firing warning shots that some aspects of the Senate bill are unacceptable, like a one-year delay in the corporate tax rate cut and preservation of the estate tax.

GOP Tax Bill: The Fine-Tuning and Defense Begins
House Republicans hope to vote on measure by Thanksgiving

From left, House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo, Kansas Rep. Lynn Jenkins, Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Florida Rep. Vern Buchanan and South Dakota Rep. Kristi Noem at a news conference in the Longworth Building on Thursday to unveil the House GOP tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Republican tax bill will undergo lots of tweaking, but the generally positive response so far indicates that leadership’s plan to vote on the overhaul by Thanksgiving is still within reach.

The stakes are high for Republicans as they search for a major legislative achievement ahead of the 2018 elections. Members agree a win is needed under President Donald Trump’s leadership after the effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law collapsed in the Senate.

House GOP Tax Bill Keeps 39.6% Rate for High Earners, Cuts Corporate Rate to 20%
Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady gathering feedback for changes to be made before Monday markup

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, seen here during the September rollout of the GOP’s tax overhaul framework. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans’ long-awaited tax overhaul bill will keep the top individual rate at 39.6 percent for high-income earners and will immediately and permanently cut the corporate rate to 20 percent. 

The legislation seeks to revamp the tax code in a major way for the first time since 1986, incorporating long-sought goals of congressional Republicans to keep more money in the pockets of individuals and families and boost incentives for businesses by closing loopholes.

Bipartisan Group Introduces Last-Ditch Bump Stock Bill
Bill would not ban the device, but subject it to an ATF registry

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., and three other lawmakers introduced a bipartisan bill Tuesday aimed at regulating bump stocks. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One month after the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, a bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced legislation that takes aim at the bump stock loophole in the National Firearms Act.

The so-called Closing the Bump Stock Loophole Act explicitly empowers the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to immediately regulate bump stocks and similar semiautomatic rifle attachments that increase the rate of fire to nearly that of an automatic weapon.