primaries

Meet Carol Miller. She Could Be the Only New Republican Woman Coming to Congress Next Year.
The GOP’s only new woman, so far, will represent West Virginia’s 3rd District

West Virginia Republican Carol Miller may be the only new GOP woman in the next Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Among the 33 new women elected to the House this week, only one is a Republican. 

Carol Miller, the majority whip in the West Virginia state House and daughter of a former Ohio congressman, won the Mountain State’s 3rd District seat Tuesday night, defeating Democratic state Sen. Richard Ojeda.

Capitol Ink | It’s a Win Win
Series finale concludes Matson’s chronicle of this past year’s political tides and turns

Previously On Capitol Ink ...

Today’s Capitol Ink caps off a series Roll Call cartoonist R.J. Matson started a year ago, looking at the 2018 midterms with his satirical eye. Here are the previous three entries in the series.

5 Surprises from the 2018 Midterm Elections
From the Indiana Senate race to the Atlanta suburbs, a scattering of the unexpected

Republican Senate candidate for Indiana Mike Braun defeated Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Indiana, by nearly double digits. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most midterm elections have dozens of individual House and Senate races that remain unpredictable right up until — and after — the polls close on Election Day. The 2018 cycle was no different, with 22 House and three Senate races still uncalled by 10:15 a.m. Wednesday.

But each year, there are a few races that experts thought they had a handle on, only to be flummoxed by the results.

5 Things That Defined the Fight for the Senate
Democrats still largely on defense, but battlefield shifted some this cycle

Former state Rep. Mike Braun defeated two congressmen in the Indiana Senate Republican primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation threw a wildcard into the race for Senate control. But the contours of the fight for the chamber aren’t much different from a year ago: Democrats running for re-election in states President Donald Trump carried by wide margins in 2016 are in trouble heading into Election Day.

Democrats are defending 26 seats — 10 of them in states that backed Trump — while Republicans are only defending nine. Given that imbalance, it’s no surprise that Trump’s effect on Senate races has been different from his influence on the fight for control of the House, where he’s put GOP incumbents on defense.

These Democrats Already Lost. Here’s What They Learned
We caught up with 3 also-ran candidates from high-profile House races

Laura Moser lost her primary in Texas’ 7th District after the DCCC came out against her. (Arun Chaudhary/Courtesy Moser for Congress)

The campaign signs are in the trash and the ads have gone dark. The midterm elections may not be over yet, but these defeated Democrats have had plenty of time to think about what went wrong.

A surge of Democratic energy earlier this year led to crowded primaries around the country, and that meant more losers than usual. Now first-time candidates like Laura Moser, Sam Jammal and Pat Ryan — a deep-blue activist, a son of immigrants and a moderate veteran, respectively — are looking at their dashed campaigns in the rearview mirror.

Fundraising Controversy Continues for Rep. Mia Love
Liberal group releases letter from FEC saying review of Love’s primary fundraising ‘remains pending’

An FEC review of primary fundraising by the campaign committee for Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, "remains pending." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Federal Elections Commission is not finished reviewing Rep. Mia Love’s campaign fundraising, according to an from the FEC to a liberal group that filed a complaint against her for alleged violations.

The Salt Lake Tribune first reported this story.

As House Republicans Brace for Losses, Freedom Caucus Prepares for Growth
Hard-line conservative bloc has been raising millions to help recruit new members

Rep. Debbie Lesko, R-Ariz., was an early recruit of the Freedom Caucus and she is now the group’s only female member. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

At a time when most House Republican factions are preparing to see their ranks shrink regardless of whether their party loses its majority next week, one caucus is expecting its membership to grow.

The House Freedom Caucus, considered the most conservative bloc of Republicans in Congress, is expecting to increase its roster of 35 members to somewhere in the 37-to-40 range, based on the number of incumbent and recruited candidates they predict could lose Tuesday.

Tea Party-Aligned Group Backing Rep. Mia Love at 11th Hour
DCCC pumps another $250,000 into Utah race to support Democrat Ben McAdams

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, is in a toss-up race with Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams in Utah's 4th District. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Just a week before the midterm elections on Nov. 6, one of the largest Tea Party-aligned groups in the country is throwing money into Utah’s 4th District race to help incumbent GOP Rep. Mia Love.

FreedomWorks, the Washington, D.C.-based conservative group that helped fund the Tea Party wave of the early 2010s, will spend some of the $270,000 it has pledged to 21 races over the last week of the 2018 cycle on Love’s re-election effort, including a last-minute peer-to-peer texting blitz.

With New Hampshire Visit, Cory Booker Checks Another Box for 2020 Bid
NJ Democrat will headline events for Young Democrats

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., will visit New Hampshire this weekend. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Cory Booker can cross another item off his checklist for a 2020 presidential bid this weekend after his scheduled trip to New Hampshire, where he’ll headline at least two get-out-the-vote events for Democrats less than two weeks before the Nov. 6 midterm elections.

The Granite State is the last of four early primary/caucus-voting states that the New Jersey Democrat, widely seen as one of a handful of front-runners for the party’s nomination for president in 2020, has yet to visit.

5 Takeaways From Heidi Cruz’s Atlantic Interview
Ted Cruz’s wife had to grapple with her place in the world as she made sacrifices for her husband

Heidi Cruz and and daughters Caroline, right, and Catherine greet guests during a convocation in March 2015 at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., where Sen. Ted Cruz announced his candidacy for president. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In a candid interview with The Atlantic, Heidi Cruz discussed the ways her life has been shaped by the political pursuits of her husband, Sen. Ted Cruz.

The Texas Republican faces a re-election challenge from Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who despite record fundraising totals, has lost momentum in the polls. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rates the race Likely Republican.