russia-investigation

Top Trump aide stops short of echoing boss’ claim that economy is ‘best it’s ever been’
But Lawrence Kudlow touts wage growth and low unemployment rate

Larry Kudlow, director of President Donald Trump’s National Economic Council, says the economy under Trump will “rank up there” with previous strong economies. (Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s chief economic adviser on Friday stopped short of endorsing the president’s repeated claim that the U.S. economy is at its strongest point in the country’s history.

“In history? I think it’ll rank up there, yes,” Lawrence Kudlow told CQ Roll Call on Friday. But he notably did not say the U.S. economy is the strongest it’s ever been as his boss heads into what pollsters and strategists in both parties say could be a photo-finish election.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 10
Collins says she’s working to make sure Senate trial rules would allow sides to call witnesses

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer told reporters the House won’t take floor action Friday on appointing its impeachment managers for a Senate trial. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Sen. Susan Collins told reporters in Maine that she’s been working all week with a “fairly small group” of Republican senators and party leaders to ensure trial rules would allow House impeachment managers and President Donald Trump’s lawyers to call witnesses.

The Bangor Daily News reports Collins declined to detail how large the group was, but she said, “we should be completely open to calling witnesses.”

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 9
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told senators at a GOP lunch to keep their schedules flexible for the end of next week

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks to reporters during her weekly news conference on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republican senators were told by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at a lunch Thursday to keep their schedules flexible for the end of next week, when they are supposed to leave Washington for a weeklong break that includes the MLK Day holiday on January 20.

According to an attendee, McConnell said that with the possibility that Speaker Nancy Pelosi could soon send over the impeachment articles, senators should be prepared to be at the Capitol for Saturday sessions starting Jan. 18.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 6
Bolton says he would testify in Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed

Former national security adviser John Bolton appears at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in September. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

Missouri GOP Sen. Josh Hawley unveiled text of a resolution seeking to change the Senate rules in order to dismiss articles of impeachment starting 25 calendar days after their adoption in the House, even if the House does not appoint managers and send over the paperwork.

“The Constitution gives the Senate sole power to adjudicate articles of impeachment, not the House. If Speaker Pelosi is afraid to try her case, the articles should be dismissed for failure to prosecute and Congress should get back to doing the people’s business,” Hawley said in a statement.

Iranian Quds commander’s assassination to follow Trump back to Washington
Democrats, allies calling for deescalation of tension with Iran while other tensions await at White House

Iranians burn an American flag during a demonstration in Tehran on Friday following the killing of Iranian Revolutionary Guards Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani in a U.S. strike on his convoy at Baghdad International Airport. (Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — There are two things White House and Trump campaign officials have not wanted to discuss when it comes to President Donald Trump’s reelection chances: An economic recession and a military conflict. Suddenly, the latter is possible.

The president’s top aides have acknowledged an economic slowdown would undermine the president’s top claim that he’s earned a second term. That’s because he leads almost every public event — no matter the topic — by touting the low unemployment and record-high stock market levels.

House contends it still needs court help to get Mueller info
Federal appeals court will hear oral arguments Friday

The House Judiciary Committee wants to force White House counsel Don McGahn to testify about episodes from the Mueller report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Pool file photo)

The House Judiciary Committee will contend Friday in court that it still needs information quickly from former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation even though the House impeached President Donald Trump last month.

The federal appeals court in Washington set oral argument for Friday morning in two committee cases: a lawsuit to force former White House Counsel Don McGahn to testify about episodes from Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, and an application to see secret grand jury materials from that same investigation.

Capitol Ink | Best of 2019
The only constant in this wild year was unpredictability

Quid pro WHOA — what a year!

In January, Democrats took control of the House amid what would become the longest federal government shutdown in history. Springtime brought, besides cherry blossoms, special counsel Robert S. Mueller II’s release of his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election — and a blindsiding by his own boss, Attorney General William Barr.

Mar-a-Limbo: With Senate trial on hold, Trump faces uncertainty during Florida vacation
Despite likely acquittal, presidential scholars see an executive office likely changed forever

President Donald Trump arrives on the South Lawn of the White House before speaking to members of the media in Washington on Oct. 10. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Trump punches back at ‘far left’ mainstream Christian publication after editorial
Trump says Christianity Today ‘would rather have a Radical Left nonbeliever, who wants to take your religion & your guns‘

Then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a worship service at the International Church of Las Vegas in October 2016 in Las Vegas. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump, always looking to fight back when he feels attacked, on Friday panned Christianity Today after the religious publication called for him to be removed from office.

“The facts in this instance are unambiguous: The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents. That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral,” the publication wrote in an editorial published Thursday.

Essay: For White House press pool on Trump’s impeachment day, the silence was deafening
President appeared to understand there are some historical events not even he can counter-program

President Donald Trump arrives at the White House early Thursday morning after a rally in Michigan. While Trump was speaking at the rally, the House voted to impeach him for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. (Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)

ESSAY | The silence was deafening. Certainly not what I expected as the White House in-town pool reporter on the day President Donald Trump was impeached. 

Trump, famous for his feisty interactions with the press as a New York businessman and who flashed his penchant for drama as a reality television host, has transformed presidential communications.