russia-investigation

‘We’re fighting all the subpoenas,’ Trump says as war with Dems heats up
Neither side backing down in fight likely to spill into heart of 2020 election cycle

President Donald Trump, here at the White House on March 20, spoke to reporters as he departed for Atlanta on Wednesday. The president had been tweeting and criticizing Mueller report since its release, and threatened to fight subpoenas issued by House Democrats. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler’s subpoena of former White House counsel Don McGahn is “ridiculous,” President Donald Trump said Wednesday as Democrats continue their investigations of his business and political life.

The president also made clear that he and his legal team are dug in for what could be a protracted fight with House Democrats over their demands for witnesses to appear before several committees and requests for documents. Legal experts and political analysts already are predicting court battles and stall tactics that could last well into the 2020 election cycle.

Trump threatens to send armed soldiers to U.S.-Mexico border
President cites Mexican troops pulling guns on National Guard troops

President Donald Trump talks to reporters as he leaves the White House earlier this month on a trip to Southern California to visit the U.S.-Mexico border. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday issued a hawkish threat to Mexican law enforcement personnel and drug traffickers, warning them he is sending “ARMED SOLDIERS” to the U.S.-Mexico border.

Trump appears to have been agitated by special counsel Robert S. Mueller’s depiction of his White House as a dysfunctional place where top aides defy his orders. Political analysts from both parties have noted when Trump feels in political or legal hot water, he typically returns to an immigration-based message.

Trump opposes aides’ testimony on Mueller report, ramping up feud with Democrats
House Judiciary Committee has subpoenaed former White House Counsel Don McGahn

President Donald Trump walks to speak with supporters on Thursday after arriving at Palm Beach International Airport to spend Easter weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort. Trumps says he is opposed to aides testifying before Congress following the public release of the Mueller report. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump said Tuesday he is opposed to current and former White House officials testifying before Congress about special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report.

“There is no reason to go any further, and especially in Congress where it’s very partisan — obviously very partisan,” Trump said in an interview with The Washington Post.

Will the White House or Trump’s lawyers block Don McGahn from testifying?
President’s team is examining case law for possible claim of executive privilege or immunity

The House Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena for former White House Counsel Don McGahn to testify before the panel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

White House officials have yet to determine whether they will exert executive privilege to block all or some of Don McGahn’s possible testimony to Congress, after Robert S. Mueller III’s report portrayed him as defying the president’s orders to hinder the special counsel’s investigation.

The report, released in redacted form last week, details several early instances when the White House counsel refused to follow through with President Donald Trump’s orders to remove Mueller. Trump has since criticized McGahn without naming him, and a decision on allowing him to appear before congressional panels — and how much he might be permitted to say — is still pending, White House aides say.

Trump attacks media, says N.Y. Times should ‘beg for forgiveness’
After relative silence post-Mueller report, president explodes with two-hour Twitter rant

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing from the White House on March 8. On Tuesday morning, he went on a two-hour Twitter rant to blast the media. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

After days of media coverage describing the White House portrayed in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report as rife with dysfunction and ignored presidential orders, Donald Trump on Tuesday lambasted those who cover him.

He even suggested one of his top media targets, The New York Times, should “get down on their knees & beg for forgiveness.”

Fact check: Trump focuses on ‘crimes,’ but impeachment is a political decision
Founders left it to Congress to define ‘high crimes and misdemeanors,’ scholars say

President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., follow Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael C. Stenger and House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul D. Irving down the House steps on March 14. Trump pushed back on impeachment talk Monday, saying it was the Democrats “that committed the crimes.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Impeachment is very much on President Donald Trump’s mind even after he declared victory right as special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report was made public. But some of his arguments against it are contradicted by the former FBI director’s conclusions and legal scholars.

“Only high crimes and misdemeanors can lead to impeachment. There were no crimes by me (No Collusion, No Obstruction), so you can’t impeach,” the president tweeted Monday morning as the hashtag #ImpeachDonaldTrump was trending on Twitter in the United States. A few hours later, the president told reporters he was “not even a little bit” concerned about being impeached.

Mueller report: Russia hacked state databases and voting machine companies
Russian intelligence officers injected malicious SQL code and then ran commands to extract information

Donna Shalala, Democratic candidate for Florida's 27th Congressional District, votes on Election Day at Coral Gables Fire Station 3 on Nov. 6, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Russian military intelligence unit known by its initials GRU targeted U.S. state election offices as well as U.S. makers of voting machines, according to Mueller’s report.

Victims of the Russian hacking operation “included U.S. state and local entities, such as state boards of elections (SBOEs), secretaries of state, and county governments, as well as individuals who worked for those entities,” the report said. “The GRU also targeted private technology firms responsible for manufacturing and administering election-related software and hardware, such as voter registration software and electronic polling stations.”

Sarah Sanders lashes out at Democrats, April Ryan over calls for her firing
Embattled Trump spokeswoman calls Dems' reaction to Mueller report ‘sad,’ wants to ‘move on’

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday criticized author and journalist April Ryan, seen here at a book-launch event in September in New York, for calling for her ouster. The Mueller report detailed times in which Sanders lied to reporters, prompting Ryan's call. (Robin Marchant/Getty Images file photo)

Newly embattled White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday lashed out at congressional Democrats and reporter April Ryan as President Donald Trump and his team began their first week following release of Robert S. Mueller III’s report.

Democratic lawmakers wasted little time Thursday calling for her ouster following the special counsel’s report that detailed several instances in which Sanders misled reporters, especially about Trump’s decision-making before he fired then-FBI Director James Comey. Ryan, an American Urban Radio Networks reporter who provides analysis for CNN, followed that night by calling for the same during an appearance on the network’s “Outfront” program.

Trump feared ‘one of these independent counsels.’ He got something else
Amid Democrats’ criticism, is Barr trying to protect Trump or the office he occupies?

President Donald Trump was worried that “one of these independent counsels,” as Kenneth Starr was during the Clinton administration, would bring the “end of my presidency,” special counsel Robert S. Mueller III concluded in his report. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jeff Sessions, then the attorney general, ended a phone call and returned to the Oval Office. It wasn’t long before President Donald Trump was in an angry rage.

Sessions, since unceremoniously fired, had just taken a phone call from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who informed him he had appointed former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III as a special counsel to look into Russia’s 2016 election meddling, including whether there was coordination with Trump’s campaign.

The Mueller report meme game has been strong on the internet
The internet quickly latched on to jokes related to redactions, and some poked fun at the report’s biggest players

Media films a few pages of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election which was printed out by staff in the House Judiciary Committee's hearing room on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The highly anticipated release of the Mueller report prompted a hefty dose of partisan debate, but it also flooded the internet with hilarious memes.

The internet quickly latched on to jokes related to extended information blackouts scattered throughout the report, and meme fabricators poked fun at high-profile individuals intimately involved in the investigation.