scandal

Trump Twists Judiciary Leaders’ Findings on Comey Actions
President says Clinton ‘not interviewed’ despite July 2016 session with FBI

A school group from Illinois touring the Newseum in Washington pauses in June to watch former FBI Director James Comey testify before senators. President Trump again attacked him Wednesday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump started Wednesday by twisting the findings of two senior Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans, tweeting that Hillary Clinton was among “people not interviewed” by the FBI in an investigation into her use of a private email server as secretary of State.

The FBI released documents Monday that show then-FBI Director James Comey began writing a statement exonerating Clinton before he concluded his investigation. Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., chairman of Judiciary’s Crime and Terrorism subcommittee, first revealed Comey’s actions Aug. 31.

Opinion: Harvey Weinstein and the GOP’s Guilt-By-Association Game
A sense of proportion — and less hypocrisy — would be nice

President Donald Trump is among the many politicians who have crossed paths with Harvey Weinstein. Melania Trump, the future president, Georgina Chapman (Weinstein’s now-estranged wife) and Weinstein were photographed together at an after party for the New York premiere of the movie “NINE.” President Trump recently told reporters that he’s known Weinstein a long time and was not surprised by allegations of sexual misconduct against him. (Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images for the Weinstein Company)

The odds are high that this autumn members of Congress — maybe both Democrats and Republicans — will pocket campaign contributions from Americans who will later be engulfed in scandal. The besmirched political donors could be exposed as Ponzi scheme promoters, corrupt corporate executives, crooked lawyers or sex offenders.

Amid the predictable uproar when the news stories break, there will be loud partisan cries to return all campaign contributions from these disgraced figures. And so congressional incumbents will scramble to explain a half-forgotten $2,700 check from a fundraiser and a hastily scrawled “To My Dear Friend ...” inscription on a photograph from the event.

Rick Perry Defends Private Travel Costs at House Energy Hearing
Some sites are too remote to be accessed by commercial airlines, secretary says

Energy Secretary Rick Perry testifies during a hearing before the House Energy and Commerce’s Energy Subcommittee on Thursday. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

BY ELVINA NAWAGUNA

Energy Secretary Rick Perry told lawmakers Thursday that his use of private aircraft for work travel is sometimes justified because his department’s national laboratories and some sites he has to visit are too remote to be accessed by commercial airlines.

Assange Upends Rohrabacher, Denies He Will Reveal DNC Emails Source
WikiLeaks founder says he ‘never will reveal a source’

California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher has said he has proof Russia was not the provider of Democratic National Committee emails released by WikiLeaks last July. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Julian Assange appeared to dispute Rep. Dana Rohrabacher’s assertion that the WikiLeaks founder is ready to give up the source who provided his website with the Democratic National Committee emails it published last July.

“WikiLeaks never has and never will reveal a source,” Assange tweeted Wednesday.

Opinion: In a Culture War, American Values Lose
Nation’s top leaders have already picked a side

Vice President Mike Pence’s staged walkout at a Colts-49ers NFL game in Indianapolis was a political stunt that disrespected several players’ support of equality, justice and police accountability, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

Over the weekend, a group of white nationalists returned to Charlottesville, Virginia, faces proudly uncovered and tiki torches in hand, with a message of division.

White supremacist leader Richard Spencer said to applause, “You are going to have to get used to white identity” — and warned of more to come.

Opinion: A Fake Senate Hearing on Fake News
What if the Intelligence Committee took up the president’s request

North Carolina Sen. Richard M. Burr, right, and Virginia Sen. Mark Warner lead the Senate Intelligence Committee, which President Donald Trump called on recently to look into “Fake News Networks.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Under Donald Trump’s interpretation of the Constitution, when the president tweets, the Senate must take action immediately.

So it was with Trump’s pointed suggestion last week, filled with the kind of oddball capitalization normally found in ransom notes: “Why Isn’t the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR country to see why so much of our news is just made up-FAKE!”

Burr, Warner Should Investigate ‘Fake News Networks,’ Trump Says
Call comes a day after Intel Committee leaders pledged to find ‘any hint of collusion’

Reporters follow Senate Intelligence Committee chairman Sen. Richard Burr earlier this year. President Trump wants his panel to investigate the media, his latest attack on the First Amendment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As the Senate Intelligence Committee continues to probe possible collusion between Moscow and Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, the president wants the panel to investigate one of his self-described enemies: the news media.

A day after the panel’s chairman and vice chairman, GOP Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina and Mark Warner of Virginia, announced the entire committee has reached a “general consensus” that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. They also formally gave the Intelligence Committee’s endorsement of an intelligence community report issued last fall that delivered a warning about the Kremlin’s meddling.

At Equifax Hearings, Senators Complain of Deja Vu
It’s ‘long past time’ Congress set standards for data security, Grassley says

Richard Smith, CEO of Equifax, center, prepares to testify during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Tuesday. Smith will testify Thursday before the House Financial Services Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Judiciary Committee members voiced exasperation about holding another hearing on whether consumers’ personal information is secure as Richard Smith, the former CEO of Equifax, made his third congressional appearance in two days to explain a security breach that allowed hackers to gain access to personal data — names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and some driver’s license information — on more than 145 million consumers. 

Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley of Iowa said Wednesday that it is “long past time” that Congress set standards for data security, adding that he was “committed to getting a good bill ... over the finish line.”

Murphy Will Not Seek Re-Election Following Affair Revelations
Pennsylvania Republican announced his decision Wednesday

Pennsylvania Rep. Tim Murphy announced Wednesday he would not run for re-election after revelations about his affair. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Tim Murphy announced Wednesday that he would not seek re-election, following revelations that he urged a woman with whom he had an affair to get an abortion.

The Pennsylvania Republican said in a statement that he would not run for a ninth term in Congress. He said there was still work to be done and he would serve out the remainder of his term.

Lawmakers Push Trump to Release JFK Assassination Files
Bipartisan group introduce resolutions ahead of October deadline

Sens. Charles E. Grassley and Patrick J. Leahy want files on the Kennedy assassination released. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senior lawmakers are calling on President Donald Trump to allow the release of remaining government records on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Resolutions introduced in the House and Senate would call on the president to allow release of documents held by the National Archives and Records Administration, and for the Archives to work to meet a statutory deadline that arrives later in October.