scandal

Wasserman Schultz Defends Keeping Fired IT Worker
‘I believe that I did the right thing, and I would do it again,’ Florida congresswoman says

Florida Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz said she believes fired IT worker Imran Awan is getting additional scrutiny because he is Muslim. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz defended keeping a fired IT worker on her payroll despite the fact he was banned from the House network and fired by another member of Congress. 

Wasserman Schultz said it would have been easier to fire Imran Awan.

The Return of Michael Grimm?
Disgraced former New York congressman reportedly gauging interest for a primary challenge to Rep. Dan Donovan

Former Rep. Michael Grimm is weighing a primary challenge to his successor, Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y. (Photo By Tom Williams/Roll Call via Getty Images)

It started out small: Rumors swirled in March that disgraced former Rep. Michael Grimm was considering a political comeback by running for Staten Island borough president.

But now he’s thinking bigger: Grimm wants to win back New York’s 11th District seat, according to local media reports.

Trump Again Lashes Out at Congress Over Russia Sanctions
U.S. president sees relations with Moscow at ‘dangerous’ low point

Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with President Donald Trump at a G-20 summit in Germany. Trump is blaming Congress for what he calls an "all time" low in U.S.-Russia relations. (Wikimedia Commons)

Lashing out at Congress yet again, President Donald Trump blamed the 517 lawmakers who voted for a bill he signed Wednesday slapping new sanctions on Russia for what he calls a “dangerous low” in U.S.-Kremlin relations.

Trump used a morning tweet, after laying off his post-dawn social media blasts for two days, to continue his days-long Twitter assault on members of Congress — including his fellow Republicans — amid signs of growing intra-party tensions as the forced marriage strains under an unproductive legislative session.

Trump Makes Russia Sanctions Law, Then Savages Congress
President takes swipe at Senate Republicans after signing bipartisan bill

Despite his calls for warmer relations with the Kremlin, President Trump on Wednesday signed a bill slapping new sanctions on Russia. It also puts new penalties on North Korea and Iran. (Wikimedia Commons)

President Donald Trump signed bipartisan legislation slapping new sanctions on Russia, Iran and North Korea — then harshly criticized the legislation and the 517 lawmakers who voted for it.

Trump’s words reveal anew his growing irritation at Republican lawmakers’ inability to pass legislation he prefers and Democrats’ unwillingness to help. A statement issued by the White House after he signed the sanctions bill includes this line: “Congress could not even negotiate a healthcare bill after seven years of talking.”

Lawyers Say Investigators Asked Witnesses About Schock’s Sexuality, Exploits
Ex-Illinois GOP congressman’s legal team says feds overstepped

Former Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock has been indicted on 24 charges regarding his personal finances and misuse of public funds. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawyers for former Rep. Aaron Schock on Tuesday accused federal investigators of misconduct for asking witnesses about whom the Illinois Republican slept with and if he was gay.

Schock’s defense team filed a memo in court alleging the prosecutor and federal agents “have dug into every aspect of Mr. Schock’s life by any means necessary,” the Chicago Sun-Times reported Tuesday.

White House Acknowledges Trump Helped Craft Son’s Statement
Lawyer had said president played no role in message on Russian lawyer meeting

The White House on Tuesday admitted that the president, while aboard Air Force One after a G-20 summit last month, helped craft his eldest son’s statement about a meeting with a Russian lawyer. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

In a reversal, the White House acknowledged Tuesday that President Donald Trump offered what it said was fatherly advice to his eldest son about a statement explaining a June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer believed to be bringing Kremlin-supplied dirt on Hillary Clinton. However, the president’s top spokeswoman said the elder Trump did nothing wrong.

Trump’s team initially denied the president was personally involved in drafting the statement, but a Washington Post article published Monday evening — citing multiple sources — painted him as its primary author. Trump dictated the statement to Hope Hicks, one of his closest advisers, on Air Force One last month as he returned from a G-20 summit in Europe, according to the Post report.

Rep. DeSantis Wants Congress to Investigate Wasserman Schultz
Says arrested former IT contractor had access to ‘some very sensitive information’

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., cut ties with Imran Awan after his arrest last week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Ron DeSantis told “Fox & Friends” Monday  said Congress should investigate Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s employment of a man charged with submitting a fraudulent loan application and potentially scamming his House employers. 

Asked if Wasserman Schultz should be forced to testify DeSantis responded, “I think it's questionable what they were doing during that time,” referring to Imran Awan and other members of his family. “We would have to investigate that. Of course, they had access to intelligence and House Foreign Affairs Committee members’ personal email and IT accounts. There is some very sensitive information on there. This could be a significant security breach.”

Scaramucci Predicts Priebus Ouster in Vulgar Call to Reporter
‘I sometimes use colorful language’

Incoming White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci verbally attacked Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Chief Strategist Steve Bannon in a conversation with a New Yorker reporter — or as Scaramucci put it used colorful language. (Wikimedia Commons)

Incoming White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci told a New Yorker reporter Reince Priebus is a “paranoid schizophrenic” and said Donald Trump’s chief of staff would be asked to step down “very shortly.”

Scaramucci also blasted former Breitbart executive and White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon to New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza, accusing him of trying to build his personal brand “off the f------ strength of the president.” The former Wall Street financier also threatened to completely clean out the White House communications shop over leaks to the press.

Scaramucci Vs. Priebus: Trump’s West Wing War Goes Public
‘We have a very, very good idea of who the leakers are,’ warns ‘The Mooch’

White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci took his battle with Chief of Staff Reince Priebus public via a tweet and a cable news interview. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s incoming communications director and “friend” Anthony Scaramucci took his war with White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus public Thursday, revealing a West Wing in chaos over leaks to the media.

Scaramucci, the Wall Street investment banker hired by Trump less than a week ago to enhance his communications shop, fired a warning shot at Priebus in a tweet posted late Wednesday night.

Trump Considering Vetoing Bipartisan Sanctions Bill, Scaramucci Says
Spokesman says president might negotiate ‘a tougher deal’ against Moscow

Incoming White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci said Thursday that President Donald Trump might veto a Russia-Iran-North Korea sanctions bill that got 419 votes in the House. (Wikimedia Commons)

President Donald Trump might veto a House-passed measure that would slap new sanctions on Russia, Iran and North Korea so he can “negotiate” tougher penalties against Moscow, says incoming White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci.

In an unscheduled and combative phone call to CNN’s “New Day” morning show, which Scaramucci said came after a 15-minute talk with Trump, the former Wall Street financier made clear the president has not ruled out rejecting a bill that got 419 Republican and Democratic votes, with only 19 members in the 435-seat body voting against it.