scandal

Opinion: James Comey and the Art of the Shiv
FBI director has the credibility to oppose the White House

In his testimony Monday, James B. Comey dropped enough bombshells to solidify his reputation as the most significant FBI director since J. Edgar Hoover, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Late in Monday’s marathon hearing of the House Intelligence Committee, FBI Director James Comey reminded the nation that he was something of a hostile witness, reluctantly summoned to talk about Russia, Donald Trump and the 2016 campaign.

“I’d rather not be talking about this at all,” Comey said. “Now we are going to close our mouths and do our work.”

Opinion: Echoes of Watergate Could Spell Danger for Trump
But the bar for impeachment is high

Bipartisan consensus on impeaching the president, as was the case with President Richard M. Nixon’s Watergate scandal, can be reached only if the American people demand it, Holtzman writes. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

In 1974, the House Judiciary Committee voted to impeach President Richard M. Nixon, the only impeachment effort to force a president from office in our country’s history. Today, many Americans, alarmed at President Donald Trump’s conduct, want him to be impeached and removed from office.

As a member of the House Judiciary Committee in 1974, I found that impeachment was not easy or quick. Still, that impeachment effort may provide a useful road map for how to proceed today.

GOP Warns Comey About Cloud Over Trumpland
White House continues to push allegation of wiretapping

FBI Director James B. Comey, center, and National Security Agency Director Michael S. Rogers arrive to testify at the House Intelligence Committee hearing on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s top spokesman wants the world to “take no for an answer” on whether there was collusion between Russian officials and the former reality television star’s presidential campaign, even while the House Intelligence Committee chairman says “a big gray cloud” is hanging over Trump’s associates in the form of an FBI investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

“There is a big gray cloud that you have put over people who have very important work to do to lead this country. The faster you can get to the bottom of this, it’s going to be better for all Americans,” California Republican Devin Nunes said to FBI Director James B. Comey at the conclusion of a nearly six-hour hearing on the intelligence community’s conclusion that Moscow directed a campaign to disrupt the election and help Trump win the White House.

Gay Pride Flag Outside Lowenthal’s Office Stomped on
Suspect appeared to have been a visitor to Cannon House Office Building

The rainbow flag was hung back up following the incident. (Courtesy of Lowenthal's office)

Capitol Police are investigating an incident Wednesday in which the Gay Pride flag that hangs outside of California Democratic Rep. Alan Lowenthal’s office was thrown to the ground and stomped on.

Staff was told by witnesses that the perpetrator was a man who appeared to have been a visitor to the Cannon House Office Building with what appeared to be his wife and young son. The incident occurred on Wednesday.

Ethics Watchdogs Make a Career of It
Norm Eisen and Richard Painter are among Trump’s most vocal critics

Norm Eisen served as former President Barack Obama’s ethics czar. (Courtesy Brookings.edu)

Norm Eisen, Barack Obama’s White House ethics czar, was such a stickler for enforcing the rules that even some colleagues privately expressed relief when he traipsed off to Prague for an ambassadorship.

Now, people can’t get enough of him.

Ethics Watchdog Pushes Back on White House View of Rules
OGE faults administration for not taking action against Kellyanne Conway

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway’s comments on Fox News last month encouraging viewers to buy Ivanka Trump-branded products drew strong criticism from the Office for Government Ethics. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A top government ethics official told lawmakers Thursday that he was troubled by the Trump White House’s interpretation of ethics laws.

Walter M. Shaub Jr., who runs the Office of Government Ethics, said he remained concerned about comments last month by Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to President Donald Trump, encouraging Fox News viewers to purchase Ivanka Trump-branded products after some retailers announced they were discontinuing the presidential daughter’s line.

Opinion: We Need Robert Osborne to Tell Us This Is Only a Movie
Looking at the politics of today through a cinematic lens

The death of Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne reminds us that film may be the best outlet for making sense of and escaping from our uncertain political times, Curtis writes. (David Buchan/Getty Images file photo)

Robert Osborne, why did you leave us when we need you most? The death this week of the Turner Classic Movies host only highlights, as political developments spiral from the unexpected to the unbelievable, that film may be the best outlet for explanation and escape.

Of course, the movies, products of the times in which they are created, and made with the primary goal of entertainment and profit, are far from free of problematic politics. As a culture consumer, I have had to overlook how much unsavory American history Hollywood dream makers have eradicated when crafting sanitized narratives for the silver screen. For example, no number of Academy Awards could ever rescue the pixilated depiction of the Civil War delivered in “Gone with the Wind” — best to avoid that one.

High Risk for Trump’s Asking Congress to Probe His Tapping Claim
Intelligence panels’ bipartisan approach might lead to answers president won’t like

President Donald Trump’s calls on Congress to investigate his wiretapping allegations carries many risks and could also complicate the selling of his legislative agenda, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In the long and storied history of congressional investigations, there’s no record of lawmakers acting at the president’s behest to get to the bottom of his own extraordinarily explosive but totally unsubstantiated allegations.

But that is going to be the case in the already amply unprecedented era of President Donald Trump. The result could not only change the very nature of legislative branch oversight, but also alter the turbulent course of this nascent administration.

Poll: Majority Says Sessions Should Resign for Lying Under Oath
And majority think illegal immigrants should stay

Majority of voters feel that Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, lied in his hearing before the Sente Judiciary Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A slight majority in a new poll say that Attorney General Jeff Sessions lied at his confirmation hearings and should resign.

The Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday found that 52 percent of the voters think Sessions lied under oath, and 51 percent feel he should resign, while 40 percent and 42 percent of respondents, respectively, felt the opposite.

Sessions Clarifies Russia Testimony to Senate Committee
AG says he answered questions at confirmation hearing honestly

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified at his confirmation hearing in January that he “did not have communications with the Russians.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave a succinct answer to the Senate on Monday to the questions swirling about his testimony that he did not communicate with Russians during the campaign: “My answer was correct.”

The former Alabama senator, an adviser to the Trump campaign, testified under oath in January at his confirmation hearing that he “did not have communications with the Russians” when asked a question about Trump’s campaign and Russian officials, and he reiterated that answer in a response to a written question.