scandal

Trump to frustrated Jewish Dems: GOP will welcome you with ‘open arms’
Fires off religion-based tweet minutes after offering ‘warmest sympathy’ to New Zealand after slaughter in mosques

President Donald Trump, pictured here during CPAC 2019 on March 2 near Washington, on Friday offered frustrated Jewish Democrats a home in the Republican Party. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Friday claimed Democratic politicians treat Jewish people with “total disrespect,” saying his Republican Party would welcome them with “open arms.”

He used a morning tweet to claim the so-called “‘Jexodus’ movement” of offended Democrats out of the party after a freshman congresswoman’s recent controversial remarks is fueled by “Total disrespect!” shown to them by Democratic politicians.

‘We’re not a subpoena production factory’: Nadler moving carefully on obstruction probe
House Judiciary Committee has requested documents from 81 people and entities tied to Trump for it obstruction investigation

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is investigating possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his associates. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Documents requested from key associates of Donald Trump as part of the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation into obstruction of justice and corruption are beginning to trickle in, the top Democrat on the committee indicated Thursday.

About half of the 81 people and entities connected to Trump who received letters and document requests in February from Chairman Jerrold Nadler have been in touch with the New York Democrat’s staff about complying with the committee’s probe.

Trump says he’s not thinking of pardoning Paul Manafort — but won’t rule it out
New state charges, however, would leave POTUS powerless to free his former campaign chairman

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort leaves the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse after a court hearing on the terms of his bail and house arrest on Monday, Nov. 6, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday reiterated his sympathy for Paul Manafort, but would not commit to a pardon after his former campaign chairman manager was sentenced to additional prison time that brings his total behind bars to at least 7 1/2 years.

But the longtime Republican political operative, just minutes after receiving a 3 1/2-year federal sentence, on top of a previous 4-year sentence, was indicted on 16 counts by New York state prosecutors. If convicted and sentenced on any of the state counts, the president would lack any powers to pardon him from those.

Cummings won’t pursue perjury charges against Cohen ‘at this time’
Republicans on Oversight Committee wanted Justice Department to investigate whether Trump’s former attorney lied under oath

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies during a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Chairman Elijah Cummings of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform on Wednesday quashed any notion that he would refer Michael Cohen to the Justice Department for perjury.

Republicans on the oversight panel have claimed that the former personal lawyer for President Donald Trump committed perjury when he told the committee at a public hearing in February “I never asked for, nor would I accept” a pardon from Trump.

Trump to face reporters after 5 days of silence and a run of bad news
Previous spans of silence have ended with eruptions from POTUS

President Donald Trump, after a five-day break, will face reporters’ questions Wednesday afternoon. Such silence spans have ended with presidential eruptions since he took office. (Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS - “Just another quiet day at the White House,” a reporter said to a Roll Call scribe as they left the executive campus Tuesday evening. “Too quiet,” the Roll Call reporter responded, adding: “Can’t last much longer.” The first reporter nodded knowingly and said, “Yeah...”

More than a bit out of character, President Donald Trump has not uttered a word in public since Friday. That is scheduled to change Wednesday afternoon — and anything could happen.

Lawmakers, operatives weigh in on Fox News’ rough weekend
The controversies hitting the cable news network elicited a series of reactions from people across the political spectrum

Tucker Carlson speaks onstage during Politicon 2018 at Los Angeles Convention Center on October 21, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Rich Polk/Getty Images for Politicon )

After a weekend of bad PR for Fox News, lawmakers and politicos offered a mixed bag of reactions to the series of controversies hitting the cable news network.

Host Jeanine Pirro questioned Rep. Ilhan Omar’s American allegiance because she wears a hijab during a monologue on her Saturday primetime show “Justice with Judge Jeanine.” And tape surfaced from 2006 where Tucker Carlson argues that facilitating child rape is not the same as raping children, uses the c-word to describe women and uses other inflammatory language.

Seems like everyone’s talking religion on Capitol Hill — here’s the breakdown
Catholics are plentiful, Jewish Republicans — not so much

Rep. Ilhan Omar’s comments about Jews prompted an animated discussion on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Religion has been a contentious topic on Capitol Hill in recent weeks.

Minnesota Democratic freshman Ilhan Omar posted several tweets that critics described as anti-Semitic. House Democrats, in response, passed an anti-hate resolution on Thursday after several days of debate. And on Friday, President Donald Trump controversially declared that the Democratic Party is “anti-Jewish.”

Top Republican releases Bruce Ohr’s transcript on dossier, Russia investigation
Ohr met with members of Congress last August to discuss his role feeding the FBI information on President Trump

Ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., arrives for the House Judiciary Committee markup of a resolution authorizing issuance of a subpoena to Acting Attorney General Matthew G. Whitaker on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee released a transcript on Friday of congressional testimony from Justice Department official Bruce Ohr.

Ohr met with members of Congress last August to discuss his role feeding the FBI information about President Donald Trump and his 2016 campaign team’s ties to Russia that Ohr gathered from employees at the opposition research firm Fusion GPS.

Pelosi OK with investigating Trump children: ‘They are advisers to the president’
Democrats are ‘investigating certain subjects. Whoever falls into that net, falls into the net,’ House speaker says

Speaker Nancy Pelosi signed off Thursday on Democrats pursuing information from President Donald Trump’s children in the course of their oversight investigations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Some House Democrats have expressed reservations about going after President Donald Trump’s children in their oversight investigations into his administration, 2016 campaign and business empire.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is not one of them.

Former Rep. Aaron Schock strikes deal to avoid felony conviction
Chicago prosecutors agreed to drop all charges, if he pays back the IRS and his campaign fund

Federal prosecutors have agreed to drop charges against former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Congressman Aaron Schock could find himself with a clean record in few months, after federal prosecutors in Chicago agreed to drop all charges against the Illinois Republican if he pays back the IRS and his campaign fund.

Schock was indicted in 2016 on 24 criminal counts, including charges of wire fraud, mail fraud, theft of government funds, making false statements, filing false reports with federal election officials and filing false tax returns. The investigation drove him to resign from his seat representing Illinois’ 18th District in May 2015.