senate

Rand Paul’s Neighbor to Plead Guilty in Assault Case
Court documents highlight dispute about brush

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., allegedly was assaulted while he was mowing his lawn by a neighbor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The neighbor of Sen. Rand Paul who allegedly assaulted the Kentucky Republican while he was mowing his lawn has now signed a federal plea agreement.

The U.S. Attorney in Indianapolis made the announcement Friday. His office was assigned the case following the recusal by the U.S. Attorney in the western part of Kentucky.

Justice Department Wants to Re-Try Mendendez
Comes after corruption trial last year ended in mistrial

New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez was charged with taking bribes from a political donor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Justice Department said it plans to re-try Sen. Robert Menendez after his trial on corruption charges last year ended in mistrial.

Menendez was accused of accepting bribes from political donor Salomon Melgen. Judge William H. Walls declared a mistrial after individually interviewing members of the jury after it deadlocked.

No Deal After Trump-Schumer Meeting to Avoid Shutdown
‘The discussions will continue,’ minority leader says

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An impending government shutdown continued to loom following a meeting between President Donald Trump and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer at the White House Friday afternoon.

Schumer made a brief statement to reporters outside the Capitol upon his return.

Schumer Meets Trump at White House to Attempt Shutdown Dodge
Minority leader floats 3-day CR, official says

Schumer. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer left the Capitol for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Friday afternoon with a chance to broker a government shutdown-averting deal with President Donald Trump — and without Republican lawmakers in the room.

Schumer told Roll Call he hoped he could reach a deal with his outer-borough New York counterpart in the White House and keep the government operating past midnight Friday, when the current continuing resolution expires.

Capitol a Land of Confusion as Shutdown Approaches
House members not even sure if they are free to go home

A worker pushes a Senate subway car Friday morning as the Senate considers the House passed continuing resolution to fund the government on January 19, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A sense of general confusion gripped the Capitol on Friday as the Senate argued over the way forward on avoiding a government shutdown and House members were unclear about whether they were supposed to go home or not. 

“I just don’t think they are in a position to tell us anything right now,” Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., said, adding that there haven’t been any instructions from GOP leaders about whether members can leave following votes. 

F-Bombs and C-Word Prompted Cotton Cease and Desist Letters
Recipients of letters argue they can use coarse language if they want

The office of Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., sent a number of cease and desist letters after a slew of calls from constituents using coarse language. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Incessant phone calls and abusive language prompted Sen. Tom Cotton’s office to mail cease and desist letters to members of the liberal activist group Ozark Indivisible, in October.

One of those constituents, Stacey Lane of Fayetteville, Arkansas, told ArkansasOnline that she received the ultimatum after “an f-bomb or two” during phone conversations with Cotton staffers.

On Shutdowns, Trump Once Thought ‘Pressure is on the President’
But on Thursday, he said ‘it’s up to the Democrats’

President-elect Donald J. Trump greets then-President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in on Inauguration Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Not too long ago Donald Trump made clear who he thought always should be blamed when the government shuts down: the sitting president of the United States. 

On Thursday, when asked who should be blamed if the government is shuttered at the end of the day Friday, Trump responded: “It’s up to the Democrats” to join Republicans and vote for a House GOP-crafted stopgap spending bill that would avert a federal shutdown.

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing Around the Capitol?
Scenes from the Senate last night and cheer for the Vikings

Dreamer protesters arrested in front of House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office in the Capitol are led away by Capitol Police on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

With Shutdown Looming, Trump Doubts Dems Will Keep Lights On
President: Dems want ‘illegal immigration and weak borders’

As the possibility of a government shutdown was growing Friday morning, President Donald Trump tweeted, “We need more Republican victories in 2018!” (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

With just hours to go before his government will shut down, President Donald Trump started the day by using that prospect to make the case for Republican candidates in November’s midterm elections.

And he teased the possibility of a shutdown in his showman style — “Shutdown coming?”

Senators Leave for the Night With No Plan to Actually Avert Shutdown
Will take some bipartisanship to even schedule a vote

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pushing Democrats to reverse course on the House’s continuing resolution (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

It will take unanimous consent of 100 senators to keep the government from at least a brief shutdown.

The Senate adjourned after 10 p.m. Thursday, leaving less than a day in session to try to avert a funding lapse that was appearing inevitable, without votes scheduled on anything resembling a deal that could win bipartisan support.