senate

Senate Sends Trump Bill to Avoid Government Shutdown
Measure cleared easily after lopsided House floor vote

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell highlighted assistance to miners in the upcoming omnibus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With long-term funding still unresolved, the Senate acted quickly Friday to clear a week-long continuing resolution that will keep the government from a shutdown for another week.

The approval, by voice vote, followed a bipartisan vote in the House in favor of the latest stopgap. The measure now heads to President Donald Trump for his anticipated signature before funding lapses at midnight.

Trump’s First 100 Days Mostly Lags Predecessors
A look at the 45th president’s report card, compared to the five before him

The White House planned a flurry of activities for the week leading up to President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office. One event he attended was on the Hill — a Days of Remembrance ceremony to commemorate the Holocaust. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first 100 days benchmark that President Donald Trump will pass on Saturday, in so many ways, sums up his presidency to date: he has both dismissed it as “ridiculous” while also endorsing its value through planned events, policy announcements and even a statement regarding his accomplishments.

In the week leading up to his 100th day, the 45th president signed executive actions aimed at rolling back Obama-era federal monument designations, and ones that aim to crack down on other countries' steel and aluminum “dumping” into U.S. markets. He ratcheted up his tough talk on Canada’s trade practices, threatened to withdraw from NATO and rolled out a tax plan.

As GOP Tax Overhaul Shapes Up, Democrats Push To End The Tax Return
Taxpayers might love return-free filing, but the tax preparation industry does not

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is leading the latest effort for return-free tax filing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin promised the “largest tax reform in the history of our country” on Wednesday as the White House and congressional Republicans gear up for a major overhaul.

But while their plans emphasize large tax cuts for corporations and more modest ones for individuals, some Democrats are promoting something far more radical: the end of the tax return.

Photos of the Week: Science and Pot Protests, a Senate Bus Ride and Kids on the Hill
The week of April 24 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Archer Somodevilla, son of Getty Images photojournalist Chip Somodevilla, takes photos during Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan's weekly news conference in the Capitol on Thursday. Thursday was "Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Word on the Hill: Party Time
Burgers in Cannon today

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks with her husband, Paul, center, and Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey at an Atlantic/CBS News pre-party before the 2016 White House Corespondents’ Association Dinner. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner is a day away. But Friday is a big night for parties to start the weekend off.

RealClearPolitics, the Distilled Spirits Council, the National Restaurant Association and the Beer Institute are joining for the first annual Toast to the First Amendment. It is from 7 to 10 p.m. at the National Restaurant Association, 2055 L St. NW.

Simone Biles Tries to Get Shelley Moore Capito to Dance on TV
Gymnast and her ‘Dancing with the Stars’ partner were in the Capitol for Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day

West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, carrying her 3-year-old grandson Charlie, walks with multiple Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles to an event on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Olympic gymnast Simone Biles tried to put some pressure Thursday on Sen. Shelley Moore Capito to dance on TV.

But Biles and her ‘Dancing with the Stars’ partner Sasha Farber couldn’t quite get through to the West Virginia Republican.

Word on the Hill: Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day
Messages in pill bottles and Cory Booker’s birthday

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan poses with children of members of the media on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In both the Capitol and the White House, staffers and the press corps have a chance today to participate in Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.

House leadership has invited the media to bring their reporters-in-training to Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s weekly news conferences at 10:45 a.m.

Senate Republicans Became More Bipartisan in the Last Congress — Democrats, Not So Much
Report places Sen. Bernie Sanders as the least bipartisan senator

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, talk before a committee hearing. Collins was identified in a report as the most bipartisan senator of the 114th Congress. The report ranked Warren 88th. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats, once happy to rail against what they called obstructionist Republicans in the chamber, flipped positions with their friends across the aisle when it came to partisanship in the 114th Congress.

A new report from the Lugar Center and Georgetown University shows that most senators — almost two-thirds of the chamber — acted more bipartisan when it came to cosponsorships on bills during the most recent Congress, compared to the Congress before.

Trump Tax Plan Sets Up Another Battle With Congress
President would lower corporate rate, slash individual brackets from 7 to 3

President Donald Trump delivers remarks in the State Dining Room at the White House on Monday. On Wednesday, he laid out his tax overhaul plan. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

The Trump administration on Wednesday rolled out a massive package of tax rate reductions and code changes. Senior officials claimed it will “pay for itself,” even though details remain murky and a fight with Congress lies ahead.

With Trump’s Wall Off the Table, Obamacare Takes Center Stage in Shutdown Showdown
Funding for subsidies leads remaining issues

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, right, Vermont Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, center, and Senate Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin leave the Democratic Senate policy luncheon in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It appears President Donald Trump will settle for enhanced funding for border security instead of his signature wall.

Talks about averting a government shutdown progressed Tuesday after funding for building the wall between the U.S. and Mexico fell off the negotiating table, but lawmakers still had to work through a thicket of issues — including health care funding and family planning. They have until midnight Friday to reach a deal before government funding runs out.