staffers

Ex-Staffer and Lobbyist Took Pre-Election Leap to Antiques
Daphna Peled recently opened Pillar & Post in Georgetown

Daphna Peled recently opened Pillar & Post in Georgetown. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A few miles from the Capitol, in what feels like a getaway from political turmoil, lies a piece of vintage British culture in Washington.

Former Capitol Hill staffer turned lobbyist Daphna Peled left her political career to start Pillar & Post, an antique shop in Georgetown that sells British furniture and decor such as tea sets, pillows and artwork.

Natives on the Hill Aims to Be an Antidote to Homesickness
Three staffers launch new group for fellow Native Americans

Natives on the Hill co-founders, from left, Renée Gasper, Catelin Aiwohi and Kim Moxley. (Courtesy Sen. Tom Udall’s office)

A new staff association hopes to help Native Americans feel at home in D.C.

“A lot of us are away from home, and so there’s a community element to it. It’s harder to feel Indian sometimes in D.C. because you’re disconnected from ceremonies, cultural events,” said Kim Moxley, co-founder of Natives on the Hill. “It’s like a ‘battling homesickness’ mechanism.”

Survey: Optimism Grows Among Democratic Staffers
Aides are more confident minority party can block GOP agenda

The top three Democrats in the Senate, from left, Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin, Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and Assistant Democratic Leader Patty Murray leave a policy luncheon in the Capitol on April 25. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican congressional staffers remain hopeful that they’ll enact significant legislation in 2017, but their Democratic counterparts are gaining confidence that they can block the GOP agenda, according to the June Capitol Insiders Survey of Hill aides.

Two-thirds of the Republican respondents expected it’s at least somewhat likely they’ll enact legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. But only one in five of the Democrats said the same.

Another Congressional Baseball Event for D.C. Kids
Horton’s Kids raises funds for children in at-risk neighborhood

The batting cages are open for Home Runs for Horton’s Kids. (Courtesy Horton’s Kids)

Members of Congress are coming together at Nationals Park again, this time to support the city they work in.

The ninth annual Home Runs for Horton’s Kids to raise money for the nonprofit founded by a onetime Capitol Hill staffer is Wednesday. Horton’s Kids helps children in grades K-12 living in Washington’s most at-risk neighborhoods through educational and other social programs.

Opinion: Two Shootings in Less Than Seven Years Is Two Too Many
A lesson from Giffords, Scalise and Trump: tone it down

Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords hugs President Barack Obama at his 2012 State of the Union address as then-Rep. Jeff Flake looks on. (Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call file photo)

I’ll never forget the moment when my sense of professionalism as a journalist failed me most.

It was Jan. 25, 2012. I had raced to the corridor behind the back door of the House chamber to catch a glimpse of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona. A year had passed since a deranged lunatic fired a bullet into her brain and killed six others in a Tucson parking lot, and Giffords had just resigned her House seat.

Analysis: No Signs Baseball Shooting Will Change Hill’s Ways
Partisanship will prove stronger than promises of unity after House’s No. 3 GOP leader gravely wounded

Reps. Steve King of Iowa and Val B. Demings of Florida leave a congressional meeting about Wednesday’s shooting at the Republicans’ baseball practice in Alexandria, Va. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Don’t expect the congressional baseball practice shooting to change anything. Not the venomous partisanship that defines life at the Capitol. Not the public’s dismal opinion of the people they’ve sent to Washington. And certainly not the polarized impasse on gun control.

The torrent of words presaging something different began minutes after the shooting stopped Wednesday morning at the Republicans’ suburban practice field, with the third ranking leader of the House majority and four others grievously wounded. Across town, the Democrats halted their own early morning workout to huddle in prayer for their GOP colleagues. Groups advocating for tighter federal restrictions on firearms asserted hopefully that this time, the debate would shift in their favor.

Shooting Victims Come from All Walks of Hill Life
Majority whip among those injured at Republican baseball team practice

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot Wednesday morning at a Republican congressional baseball team practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A member of congressional leadership, two members of his security detail, a young Hill staffer and a lobbyist — a microcosm of the often hierarchical but interconnected life on Capitol Hill — were all injured at Wednesday morning’s GOP baseball team practice.

The shooting of Majority Whip Steve Scalise, as a member of House leadership, has garnered the most attention.

James Hodgkinson Had Been Frequent Critic of GOP
66-year-old Illinois man identified as shooter at Republicans’ baseball practice

In this undated file photo, James Hodgkinson holds a sign during a protest outside of a United States Post Office in Belleville, Ill. Hodgkinson has been identified as the suspect in the Wednesday, June 14, 2017, Washington D.C. shooting. (Derik Holtmann/Belleville News-Democrat via AP)

James T. Hodgkinson, who wounded five people at Republicans’ congressional baseball practice Wednesday morning before later dying at a local hospital, had been critical of the Republican party.

Hodgkinson, 66, was from Belleville, Illinois, a town outside St. Louis represented by GOP Rep. Mike Bost. The two-term member is not on the baseball team.

Mo Brooks Describes Shooting in Alexandria
Alabama Republican was at the GOP baseball practice

FBI personnel gather outside of the Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Va., to gather evidence where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and four others were wounded during the Republicans’ congressional baseball practice on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks was taking swings in the batting cage early Wednesday morning at the Republicans’ congressional baseball practice session in Alexandria, Virginia, when he heard a shooter open fire — and briefly caught a glimpse of a white, middle-aged male.

“I heard this loud ‘Blam,’” Brooks said. “I thought it was a car backfiring or something.”

Williams’ Staffer Zack Barth Shot at Baseball Practice
Barth has been released from hospital

Zack Barth, right, who worked on former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s 2016 presidential campaign, was among the five people wounded at the Republicans’ congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., on Wednesday. (Courtesy Zack Barth’s Facebook page)

Updated 5:30 p.m.

Zachary Barth, a legislative correspondent in the office of Texas Republican Rep. Roger Williams, was one of five people wounded at a Wednesday morning practice for the Republican congressional baseball team.