supreme-court

Congressional Gridlock Plays Central Role in Internet Tax Case
Supreme Court could reshape online commerce nationwide this term

Senate Budget Chairman Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., introduced a bill on the online sales taxation issue last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Tuesday in a major internet sales tax case, and it won’t be the first or last time the justices will try to figure out whether gridlock in Congress plays a role in their decision.

But usually the gridlock is not quite on this scale. The Supreme Court could reshape online commerce nationwide when it decides this term whether to overturn its 1992 ruling that bars states from collecting sales tax from out-of-state vendors.

Judiciary Chairman Calls Firing Mueller ‘Suicide’ for Trump
Grassley warns president against firing Mueller or Sessions, notes potential Supreme Court vacancy

Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley has a word of caution for President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley is warning President Donald Trump against removing Attorney General Jeff Sessions or Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

The Iowa Republican’s defense of Sessions, who faced criticism for recusing himself from the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, seemed in part because Grassley thinks his committee may be facing the prospect of a Supreme Court nomination later in 2018.

Hawley Dings McCaskill Over Gorsuch Vote in New Web Ad
Missouri GOP Senate hopeful says incumbent puts party ahead of state

A vote against Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation last year is becoming an issue in the Missouri Senate race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is launching a new digital ad Friday, foreshadowing one of his arguments in his campaign for Senate against Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill: her vote against Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch last year. 

Only three Senate Democrats voted to confirm Gorsuch, who was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the seat left open after Justice Antonin Scalia died. In a new ad, Hawley’s campaign accuses McCaskill of putting the Democratic Party base ahead of Missouri voters by her vote against Gorsuch. 

Supreme Court Grapples With Partisan Gerrymandering Once Again
Maryland case was second of three redistricting cases before justices this term

Anti-gerrymandering activists gather on the steps of the Supreme Court as it prepares to hear a case Wednesday that challenged the drawing of a Maryland congressional district. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court justices gave no clear indication Wednesday that they knew how to rule in key cases about partisan gerrymandering, with one justice pitching a sort of group argument to settle the various challenges on the issue from three states.

In oral arguments in a case from Maryland, several justices said facts about how Democratic lawmakers redrew the 6th District in 2011 — which swung it from a solid Republican to a Democratic seat in the next three elections — seemed to violate the Constitution.

Stormy Daniels Is No Kim Jong Un
North Korean leader gets U.S. president to break his relative silence

This undated picture released from North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency in 2016 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspecting a tree nursery. (KCNA/AFP/Getty Images)

Stormy Daniels, it turns out, is no Kim Jong Un. She cannot get President Donald Trump to take the bait, but the North Korean leader appears to have mastered that task.

The porn actress, who says she had a consensual sexual encounter with then-reality show star Trump and was later threatened and paid to remain silent, cannot seem to bait Trump into responding to her Sunday “60 Minutes” interview, which raised campaign finance violation questions. 

Supreme Court to Hear Second Case on Partisan Gerrymandering
This time Democrat-drawn map in Maryland is at issue

Maryland Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett’s defeat in 2012 after the state’s Democrats redrew lines for his 6th District is at the heart of Wednesday’s redistricting case before the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a second key case about partisan gerrymandering, this time focusing on the way Maryland redrew a congressional district to swing it from a Republican to a Democratic seat.

The justices already heard arguments in October in a case out of Wisconsin about whether a state’s political maps can be challenged on the basis that they entrench a benefit to one political party over another. The court has never allowed such a challenge but has not ruled it out either.

Supreme Court Spikes Pennsylvania GOP’s Final Hopes Over New Map
Court-drawn map to take effect for 2018 midterms

The United States Supreme Court building in Washington, DC on December 1, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court on Monday denied an appeal by Pennsylvania Republican lawmakers to block a new congressional map ahead of this year’s midterm elections.

The decision to turn down the application for stay killed the GOP’s final hope to block the lines drawn by the Pennsylvania state Supreme Court after it ruled the Republican-controlled General Assembly’s 2011 map represented an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander. 

Legislators, Advocates Prepare Ahead of Abortion Case
California law on crisis pregnancy centers stirs free speech debate

Supporters and opponents of abortion rights rally outside the Supreme Court in June 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers and advocacy groups are readying themselves for a highly anticipated U.S. Supreme Court case that will determine whether a California law violates free speech for so-called crisis pregnancy centers.

On March 20, the nation’s highest court will begin oral arguments in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra. At issue is the constitutionality of a California state law that requires crisis pregnancy centers to post signs explaining that the state offers subsidized family planning services including abortion.

Supreme Court Considers Voter Fashion Sense
Make America Great Again hats, Black Lives Matter t-shirts among issues

When is a hat a hat? The Supreme Court is considering whether hats and t-shirts constitute political speech in voting polling stations. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court grappled Wednesday on where to draw a line when it comes to voters who want to wear a “Make America Great Again” hat, a “#resist” T-shirt, a “Parkland Strong” button or other political messages when they cast ballots.

A century-old Minnesota law, similar to those in about nine other states, prohibits voters from wearing clothes with political messaging related to an election or ballot question. The state wants to keep the dignity, decorum and solemnity of polling places.

Orrin Hatch and Staff Have a Day in Court
Utah Republican swears in staffers to Supreme Court Bar

Utah Sen. Orrin G. Hatch had himself a full day at the Supreme Court on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Orrin G. Hatch used some old connections to get a prime seat at Supreme Court arguments Tuesday — and the Utah Republican also snagged some front-row seats for two staffers who worked on legislation at issue in the case.

Hatch, 83, has been a senator since 1977, and that makes him the second-longest serving member. But almost 10 years before that, in April 1967, he became a member of the Supreme Court Bar, Hatch spokesman Matt Whitlock said.