supreme-court

Senate Republicans Eye Monday or Tuesday Floor Vote on Kavanaugh
Schedule assumes Judiciary Committee hearing, markup does not alter GOP plans

Protesters opposing the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation to the Supreme Court march to Sen. Susan Collins’s office on Monday, Sept. 24, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republican leaders want to schedule a floor vote for Monday or Tuesday on the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court “unless something derailed it along the way,” according to Senate Republican Conference Chairman John Thune of South Dakota. 

Thune told reporters at the Capitol on Tuesday that if all goes according to plan, Republicans could get the procedural gears turning over the weekend. That assumes Thursday’s hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee featuring Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexual assault, does not alter the current trajectory that Senate GOP leaders have set. 

Trump: Second Kavanaugh Accuser Was ‘Too Messed Up’ to be Credible
President makes strongest statement yet against Supreme Court nominee’s accuser

President Donald Trump waves after addressing the media after arriving at the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday. (Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

Ted Cruz Heckled Out of D.C. Restaurant by Anti-Kavanaugh Protesters
'We believe the survivors!' activists shout

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, was shouted out of an Italian restaurant near the Capitol Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Ted Cruz and his wife, Heidi, were heckled out of a high-end Italian restaurant near the Capitol on Monday night by a group of protesters chanting, “We believe survivors!”

A video of the episode shows roughly a dozen protesters crowding Cruz’s table at Fiola on Pennsylvania Avenue as he and his wife appeared to be getting up to leave.

Second Kavanaugh Accuser Should Testify Thursday, Sanders Says
Trump spokeswoman: Democrats have ‘exploited’ women ‘for political gain’

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says both of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's accusers should testify on Thursday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A second woman who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misdeeds should be allowed to testify alongside Christine Blasey Ford, the first to come forward, during a high-stakes Senate hearing on Thursday, President Donald Trump’s top spokeswoman says.

Deborah Ramirez, 53, who was at Yale University at the same time as Kavanaugh in the 1980s, told the New Yorker in an article published Sunday evening that he exposed himself at a party while extremely intoxicated. Ford, 51, says the federal appellate judge pinned her to a bed in high school and covered her mouth so forcefully she worried he might kill her while groping her against her will. Kavanaugh denies all the allegations.

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Thursday Could Be Most Consequential Day of Trump’s Tumultuous Tenure
Kavanaugh and accuser face senators as president meets with Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein

President Donald Trump speaks at the United Nations on Monday. When he returns to Washington, a big day awaits him on Thursday. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — Circumstance, confusion and chaos have collided to ensure Thursday will be one of the most consequential — and perhaps the most by a wide margin — days of the tumultuous Trump presidency.

Washington has rarely seen the kind of spectacle ahead in just a few days, and the inevitable ramifications will trigger ripple waves that will be immediately apparent but not fully known until voters head to the ballot box on Nov. 6. For President Donald Trump, the already high stakes seem to only grow by the day.

Location, Location, Location: Hearing With Kavanaugh's Accuser Could be in Tight Quarters (For Now)

Thursday's blockbuster hearing featuring Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser is scheduled to be in a tiny room, but that could change. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser Christine Blasey Ford are expected to testify Thursday in a tiny room before the Senate Judiciary Committee.  If the hearing is held in the small room as scheduled, there won't be much room for the public — including protesters — or reporters to watch the proceedings. But that could change. 

The Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on tap for Thursday is set to be in Dirksen 226, a small room that can accommodate lawmakers, a few staffers and a witness, but not much beyond that. The highly anticipated meeting is sure to draw enormous media attention and throngs of protesters.

Mitch McConnell Reaffirms Vow for Senate to Vote on Kavanaugh
Nothing, it seems, could keep the majority leader from giving the Supreme Court nominee a floor vote

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has reaffirmed his vote to get Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh a floor vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 5:11 p.m. | Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has not heard anything that should slow confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court and is pledging to push ahead.

“Judge Kavanaugh will be confirmed,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. He was echoing comments he made Friday, before revelations of additional accusations of sexual assault were leveled at Kavanaugh on Sunday.

Twitter Battles Over Kavanaugh Nomination Roar
Social media fuels partisan fire

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is at the center of a partisan Twitter war. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The political din over Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination features the same kind of overheated rhetoric and partisanship of previous legendary confirmation fights. But this time, there is Twitter.

The preferred social media platform of President Donald Trump — the one that allows him to deliver his unfiltered message broadly and often shape the day’s media coverage — has introduced that same dynamic to the latest nomination for the high court, 280 characters at a time.

Iowa Republicans Rally Christian Coalition Behind Brett Kavanaugh
Rep. Steve King suggests any man could now be accused of sexual misconduct

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, said sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh amounted to "character assassination." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Steve King fiercely defended Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh over the weekend at an Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition event, saying that accusations that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted a woman who went to high school with him amounted to “character assassination.”

King and other Iowa GOP leaders, including Sen. Joni Ernst, Rep. David Young, and Gov. Kim Reynolds, rallied the nearly 700 Christians in the crowd behind Kavanaugh, the Des Moines Register reported, as Iowa’s senior senator, Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, negotiates the conditions of a public hearing this Thursday with the nominee's accuser, California psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford.