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Gaetz Makes Gianforte Joke, Gets Schooled
Florida congressman jokes about reporter who ‘occasionally deserved it’

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on April 26, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Florida Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz got a lesson on the state’s Stand Your Ground law after he made a joke about Montana congressional candidate’s alleged attack on a reporter.

The morning after Republican Greg Gianforte allegedly attacked a reporter for asking whether he supported the Republican health care bill after its Congressional Budget Office scoring was released, Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz joked that an editor at the Tampa Bay Times has “occasionally deserved” something similar.

Can Quist Chart Path for Other Democrats to Follow?
While national Democrats focus on Trump and Russia, Montana House candidate talks health care

Democratic U.S. House candidate Rob Quist talks with supporters during a Get Out The Vote Canvass Launch event in Great Falls, Mont., on Monday. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

While national Democrats compile lists of President Donald Trump’s controversial statements, firings, and ties to Russia as ammunition for upcoming campaigns, Democrat Rob Quist is taking a different approach.

Though Quist’s Republican opponent for Montana’s at-large seat in Congress, businessman Greg Gianforte, is favored to win the special election Thursday, Quist has gained ground recently. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales changed the race from a Likely Republican rating to Tilts Republican on Monday. His campaign announced Tuesday that he's raised more than $6 million, which has been crucial in the final days of the race.

Bipartisan Pressure Mounts on Trump to Stay in Paris Agreement
Schumer: Leaving the deal would be a ‘historic mistake’

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney takes a break during testimony before a House Budget Committee hearing in Longworth Building titled “The President’s FY2018 Budget” on May 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The White House has continued to delay a decision on whether it will stay in the Paris climate agreement, but pressure is mounting on the president from both Republicans and Democrats to keep the U.S. in the deal, albeit for different reasons.

Democrats, like environmental groups, see the accord as crucial in efforts to slow global warming. And while many Republicans despise the deal, they fear leaving it would undermine U.S. global leadership and take away the opportunity to reshape, even weaken the accord.

Why the Freedom Caucus May Vote for a Debt Ceiling Increase
Contingencies: Debt prioritization and August deadline

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney takes a break during testimony before a House Budget Committee hearing in Longworth Building titled "The President's FY2018 Budget" on May 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Freedom Caucus is looking for a debt ceiling increase by August and it’s willing to lend votes to pass one — with some caveats.

According to a source familiar with the group’s plans, the Freedom Caucus could soon take an official position saying they will provide votes for a debt ceiling increase conditional on two things — that the measure includes structural changes designed to give Treasury borrowing authority for specific obligations, known as debt prioritization, and that a vote occurs before Congress leaves for the August recess.

Health Care Backlash Prompts MacArthur to Resign as Co-Chair of Tuesday Group
‘Clearly, our group is divided’

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., walks through Statuary Hall on his way to the House floor in the Capitol for the votes on repeal and replace of Obamacare on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Trump’s ‘Taxpayer-First Budget’ Slashes Domestic Spending
President proposes $4.1 trillion in spending for fiscal 2018

A worker assembles the budget for Fiscal Year 2018 at the Government Publishing Office's plant on North Capitol Street before a visit from OMB Director Mick Mulvaney and GPO Director Davita Vance-Cooks on May 19, 2017. The budget will be released next week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The fiscal 2018 budget that will be unveiled by the White House Tuesday would wipe out the deficit in 10 years through trillions of dollars in spending cuts and new revenue generated by economic growth, based on data provided by the administration.

President Donald Trump proposes to spend $4.1 trillion in fiscal 2018, measured as outlays. The spending plan projects collecting $3.65 trillion in revenue in 2018, resulting in a $440 billion deficit in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.

Flynn May Have Lied During Security Clearance Renewal, Says Cummings
Oversight ranking member asks chairman to subpoena records from White House

Rep. Elijah Cummings, left, has asked House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Jason Chaffetz, right, to subpoena records from the White House about Michael Flynn. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The ranking member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is asking the panel’s top lawmaker to use his subpoena power to ask the White House for documents related to former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn.

Rep. Elijah Cummings wrote to Chairman Jason Chaffetz that the committee had in its possession documents that appeared to show Flynn lied to investigators in 2016 when he was getting his security clearance renewed.

A Special Counsel for Russia
The Week Ahead, Episode 54

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller is now leading the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and the special counsel's work will likely eclipse four concurrent congressional investigations, says CQ Roll Call's Todd Ruger and Niels Lesniewski. They provide the latest political and legal developments on the rapidly expanding probe.

Resources Request From Comey Disputed
Rosenstein: No evidence Comey asked for additional resources

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves the Capitol after briefing the House of Representatives on the firing of former FBI Director James Comey and the investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 campaign on Friday, May 19, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By REMA RAHMAN and LINDSEY McPHERSON

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told members of the House Friday that he had no evidence former FBI Director James Comey asked for more resources before his firing.

Weiner Pleads Guilty to Transferring Obscene Material to Minor
Former congressman faces up to 10 years in prison

Former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner leaves federal court in Manhattan after pleading guilty in sexting case on Friday to charges of transmitting sexual material to a minor. (Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

Former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner pleaded guilty Friday to a single charge of transferring obscene material to a minor in a plea deal with the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan. 

Weiner faces a sentence of up to 10 years, which a judge will decide at a sentencing hearing in September. He will also have to register as a sex offender.