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Rep. Steve King Called Immigrants ‘Dirt’ in Recorded Conversation
Iowa Republican had previously denied making the comments

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, called immigrants “dirt” in a pre-election meeting with constituents last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

News outlet The Weekly Standard released an audio recording of Rep. Steve King referring to immigrants from the West Coast as “dirt” during a conversation with constituents before the midterm elections last week.

King, who staved off a challenge from Democrat J.D. Scholten by 3 points last week, had previously denied he made the comments and called for the audio’s release.

Nadler Wants to Hear From ‘Political Lackey’ Whitaker as First Order of Business
Acting AG’s only qualification seems to be ‘hatchet man to destroy the Mueller investigation,’ Nadler says

New York Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the likely incoming chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said reports that President Donald Trump was involved in negotiations over hush money payments before the 2016 election to two women he allegedly had affairs with could constitute an impeachable offense. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The top Democrats who will be in charge of conducting oversight on the Trump administration have begun laying out a rigorous investigative plan, they said over the weekend.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the presumed next chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said the first official his committee will want to hear from is new acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker, whom the New York Democrat called a “political lackey” bent on undermining the Russia investigation.

Democrats Can’t Check the White House Alone. Neither Can Republicans
An overhaul of oversight is overdue, but partisanship isn’t what the Founders had in mind

Tom Coburn, R-Okla., left, and Carl Levin, D-Mich., ride the Senate subway in 2011, when both were still in Congress. The pair led hearings on the causes of the 2008 financial crisis. (Tom Williams/Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Congress is in desperate need of a course correction. Some may think it’s about to happen, because the Democrats have now taken control of the House. But we’re referring to a different kind of course correction. For the past ten years or so, Congress has largely ignored its constitutional responsibility to serve as a check on the excesses of the executive branch and to do so in a bipartisan manner. That’s what needs to change.

We both served for many years in the Senate, and here’s what we observed: When oversight hearings were held more for political purposes than for real fact-finding purposes, they didn’t work. Hearings like these may have been the exception rather than the rule, but they damaged Congress’ reputation. They didn’t uncover the facts, and they didn’t have the confidence of the American people.

Rep. Chris Collins Is Combative in Post-Election Interviews
New York congressman says he will finish next term, but he faces insider trading trial before his next election

Republican Rep. Chris Collins of New York blamed the negative perception of him among Republican voters on Democratic opponent Nathan McMurray and the media. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Chris Collins was the first member of Congress to endorse Donald Trump for president. These days, Collins sounds a lot like him.

Collins diminished the serious legal charges he faces, vilified the media and accused a critical constituent of being a “left-wing, radical liberal” in a series of defiant post-Election Day interviews with local media in in his Buffalo-area district.

Election Day +3: Here Are the Uncalled 11 House and 2 Senate Races
Some races going to recounts, one is going to court

Florida Gov. Rick Scott was celebrating an apparent victory with supporters on Tuesday night, but is now suing one county’s supervisor of elections with a recount looming. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:46 p.m. | Three days after Election Day, two Senate and 11 House races remain uncalled, and if the 2000 presidential race is an indication, we could be waiting weeks for the outcome of one of those Senate races.

A third race in the Senate will be decided later this month when Mississippi votes in a runoff between Tuesday’s top-two finishers.

All the Post-Election Questions You Were Too Afraid to Ask
With special guest Professor U.R. Wise, scholar of the later campaigns of Harold Stassen

Aren’t House Democrats taking a political risk by doubling down on Nancy Pelosi? No, says our resident expert. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — To answer your post-election questions, we have retained the services of Professor U.R. Wise, the holder of the Warren G. Harding chair in political philosophy at Flyover University.

A: Pelosi is the great survivor of American politics. Assuming she has the votes, Pelosi will become the first legislator in American history to regain the speaker’s gavel after a gap as long as eight years.

Newly Empowered House Democrats Vow to Act After Latest Mass Shooting
But Republican control in the Senate makes any legislation unlikely

Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., speaks during the news conference at the Capitol on in November 2017 to call on House Judiciary chairman Bob Goodlatte to hold a hearing and examine the use and legality of “bump stocks” after the mass shooting in her district in Las Vegas. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A mass shooting in California has again reignited the debate over guns in America and Congress.

A gunman opened fire at a bar hosting a “college night” in Thousand Oaks late Wednesday night, killing 12 people and injuring many more, according media reports. Among the dead was a sheriff’s sergeant who charged into the bar to confront the shooter.

Midterms Wash Away Nearly Half of Climate Caucus Republicans
The bipartisan group has been unable to break the GOP bottleneck on climate change issues

Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., lost his re-election bid to Democrat Debbie Mucarsel-Powell in a district that covers the Florida Keys and parts of Miami and is prone to damage from sea level rise. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The bipartisan House Climate Solutions Caucus lost nearly half of its Republican members in Tuesday’s elections, including co-founder Rep. Carlos Curbelo of Florida, posing a setback in efforts to break the GOP firewall on environmental issues.

Still, the group behind the initial formation and growth of the caucus says the loss, which came both through retirements and defeats at the polls, does not signal its end.

It’s Thursday — 13 House Races, 3 Senate Races Yet Unresolved
Democrats look to expand their majority in the House, as GOP looks for Senate gains in Arizona, Florida

Republican Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, has not been declared the winner in his race against Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson, though Nelson is calling for a recount. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two days after Election Day, three Senate races and 13 House races remain unresolved. A runoff later this month will determine the winner of the Senate race in Mississippi.

House Democrats have already passed the threshold for a majority by winning 225 seats so far, wresting control of a chamber they haven’t held since 2010. Based on current projections, they could obtain as many as 234 seats — good for a 33-seat majority — though it is more likely they’ll land somewhere around 228 seats for a still-significant 21-seat margin.

Here’s How a House Democratic Majority Might Protect Mueller If Trump Fires Him
With power to investigate and subpoena, Democrats have options to protect special counsel

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., will be one of the Democratic leaders in charge of protecting special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats, with their new majority, will have an expansive new toolkit once they take control of the chamber on Jan. 3 to protect special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation — even if acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker decides to shut it down.

If President Donald Trump, through Whitaker or his full-time replacement, does indeed order Mueller to shutter his investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election, that would trigger a quick response from Democrats. In two months, they will wield the all-important power of subpoenaing officials.