EXBR

Trump’s First 100 Days Mostly Lags Predecessors
A look at the 45th president’s report card, compared to the five before him

The White House planned a flurry of activities for the week leading up to President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office. One event he attended was on the Hill — a Days of Remembrance ceremony to commemorate the Holocaust. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first 100 days benchmark that President Donald Trump will pass on Saturday, in so many ways, sums up his presidency to date: he has both dismissed it as “ridiculous” while also endorsing its value through planned events, policy announcements and even a statement regarding his accomplishments.

In the week leading up to his 100th day, the 45th president signed executive actions aimed at rolling back Obama-era federal monument designations, and ones that aim to crack down on other countries' steel and aluminum “dumping” into U.S. markets. He ratcheted up his tough talk on Canada’s trade practices, threatened to withdraw from NATO and rolled out a tax plan.

Top Trump Aide on First 100 Days: ‘I Don’t Regret Anything’
White House busily selling first three months as productive, critics disagree

The North Lawn of the White House, the Washington Monument, and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, seen from the roof of the Hay Adams Hotel. President Trump is nearing his 100th day in office. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

A top Trump aide stopped shy of admitting the new administration has made mistakes, despite a turbulent three months as President Donald Trump nears his 100th day in office.

“I don’t regret anything,” a senior White House official told reporters Tuesday evening.

White House: Final Health Care Deal Unlikely This Week
Tax package appears months away from hitting Capitol Hill

President Donald Trump watches the lighting of memorial candles during the annual Days of Remembrance Holocaust ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda on April 25, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A deal with House Republicans this week on health care is unlikely, a White House official said, and it will be at least six weeks before any tax reform legislation receives serious action on Capitol Hill.

President Donald Trump shocked congressional Republicans last week when he said he wanted a vote on a revised measure that would repeal and replace the Obama administration’s 2010 health care law. But with lawmakers slogging toward a Friday government-shutdown deadline, and with thorny issues remaining on a new health bill, it appears any pact on the latter is at least a week away.

Podcast: Trump's About-Face in His First 100 Days
The Big Story, Episode 51

The first 100 days of an administration have been used as a benchmark to gauge the progress made by a sitting president. Donald Trump’s first 100 days are punctuated by successes such as confirmation of a Supreme Court nominee and self-inflicted wounds such as the travel ban, says CQ Roll Call’s White House correspondent John T. Bennett. But what is most striking about Trump thus far, adds Bennett, is the difference between candidate Trump and President Trump.

Trump Might Accept Wall Funding Later To Avoid Shutdown
Announcement could help negotiations on fiscal 2017 spending bills before Friday deadline

President Donald Trump delivers remarks while hosting ambassadors from the 15 country members of the United Nations Security Council with his Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley, left, and National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster in the State Dining Room at the White House on Monday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By John T. Bennett and Jennifer Shutt, Roll Call

President Donald Trump indicated Monday that he might sign legislation that would avert a government shutdown even if lawmakers leave out the $1.4 billion he’s requested to begin construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

White House Plans Week of Activities as Trump’s 100th Day Approaches
President still lacks a big legislative victory amid record low approval ratings

President Donald Trump prepares to sign an executive order last week in Wisconsin aimed at bringing jobs back to American. His 100th day in office is fast approaching without a legislative win. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:41 a.m. | The White House has prepared an action-packed week for President Donald Trump ahead of his 100th day in office, including the unveiling of the “principles” behind his tax overhaul plan and more executive orders.

Trump and his senior staff are gearing up to make the case it will be the most productive 100 days for any president in 84 years. Democrats, meanwhile, will be pushing their position — that the 45th president has spent his first few months in office breaking his campaign promises.

Shutdown Under GOP Control Could Be Historic
Federal funding gaps rare under unified government

Not since President Jimmy Carter’s administration have funding gaps occurred when Congress and the executive branch were unified under one party. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If the Republican majorities in the House and Senate are unable to get legislation to President Donald Trump’s desk to keep the government running beyond an April 28 deadline, it could be a fairly historic political moment.

Not since President Jimmy Carter’s administration have a Congress and an executive branch unified under one party seen government funding gaps occur, according to the Congressional Research Service.

Trump Appeals for a Little Respect
U.S. president: ISIS attack will have ‘big effect’ on French election

President Donald Trump enjoyed the view from the cab of a big rig truck when he welcomed members of American Trucking Associations to the White House in March. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

The president of the United States, after 91 turbulent days in office, wants a little R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

Donald Trump is coming up on his 100th day as the country’s chief executive, and he is expressing frustration that many are judging what typically is a “honeymoon period” for presidents in less-favorable way than he is.

Analysis: Trump’s Bold Talk Replaced by ‘See What Happens’ Stoicism
From health care to North Korea to Russia, president now strikes a wait-and-see tone

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a news conference in the East Room of the White House April 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Donald Trump is taking a wait-and-see approach more and more often, following a 2016 campaign that espoused bold promises and exuded confidence.

Take his comments Thursday afternoon about an effort among White House officials and congressional Republicans to try again at repealing and replacing former President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law.

Chaffetz Departure Opens Coveted Oversight Chairmanship
Freedom Caucus members in panel’s leadership poised to make a play for seat

The departure of Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Jason Chaffetz, left, could give Reps. Trey Gowdy, middle, and Jim Jordan, right, an opportunity to capture the coveted seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As Chairman Jason Chaffetz suggested Wednesday he may not finish his congressional term, top Republicans on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee mostly avoided weighing in on whether they would seek the seat under a GOP White House.

The Utah Republican unabashedly used the position of being the House’s top inquisitor to become nationally prominent in a coveted seat. But he did so under a Democratic administration that the House GOP despised.