LBBY

John McCain’s wife: My husband’s legacy ‘under attack’
Cindy McCain pushed back against Trump’s recent comments in fundraising letter for McCain Institute

Cindy McCain, wife of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., looks at the casket during a memorial service at the Arizona State Capitol on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, Pool)

The widow of Sen. John McCain pushed back against President Donald Trump’s continued attacks against the late Arizona Republican.

“The legacy and record of John McCain are under attack,” Cindy McCain, the senator’s wife, wrote in a fundraising email for the McCain Institute for International Leadership at Arizona State University.

Suspect who mailed explosive devices to Trump critics pleads guilty, avoids trial
None of the devices exploded before being discovered

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., was among the critics of President Donald Trump who were mailed explosive devices. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Florida man charged with mailing explosive devices to critics of President Donald Trump pleaded guilty Thursday before a federal judge in New York.

Cesar Sayoc Jr. was scheduled to go on trial this summer on charges including interstate transport of explosive devices, illegal mailing of explosives, threatening former presidents and assaulting federal officers. Sayoc was facing up to 58 years in prison.

Cummings says Trump administration’s use of private email violates records act
The Maryland Democrat argued that Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner and others violated The Presidential Records Act

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., leaves the House Democrats' caucus meeting in the Capitol on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Elijah Cummings, chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, penned a letter to White House counsel Pat Cipollone Thursday, alleging that Trump administration officials violated federal law.

The Maryland Democrat said in his letter that the committee’s investigation has found new information that “raises additional security and federal records concerns about the use of private email and messaging applications,” by President Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, son-in-law Jared Kushner and several other administration officials.

This Democrat seeks GOP support with new climate action plan
Paul Tonko hopes to win over Republicans by tying solutions to job creation, technological advancements and other policies

Rep. Paul Tonko, D-N.Y., speaks during the Bipartisan Heroin Task Force news conference on the release of the 2018 legislative agenda for the 115th Congress on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A House Democrat hopes he can win over GOP support for a climate action by tying solutions to job creation, technological advancements and policies that do not create uncertainty for industry and families.

Rep. Paul Tonko who chairs the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change, said Thursday he plans to tap into the apparent willingness of more Republicans recently to talk about climate change and come up with solutions both parties can agree on.

Shrinking victims fund signals tough times for appropriators
The program’s finances are drying up, and committees may not be able to depend on it to fill funding gaps elsewhere

Leahy: higher costs, less money to go around in fiscal 2020, even if there's a caps deal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been an unspoken rule among appropriators for years: if the annual Commerce-Justice-Science subcommittee allocation feels a little light, fear not. There’s always money in the Crime Victims Fund.

However, the good times may be coming to an end. The program’s finances are drying up, and the Appropriations Committees are facing major new obligations in fiscal 2020 that will stretch the means of panel leaders even if there’s a deal to lift austere spending caps for next year.

Lindsey Graham’s embrace of Trump working with home state GOP voters, new poll finds
Republican senator won 56 percent of primary votes in 2014, third-lowest among incumbent senators

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has cozied up to the president in recent months, which has boosted his polling numbers among Republican voters in his state. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Lindsey Graham’s embrace of President Donald Trump appears to be paying political dividends, a new poll found.

The South Carolina Republican’s approval rating among Republicans and those who lean Republican in his state stands at 74 percent, according to a new Winthrop University survey released Thursday.

‘Bless Her Heart’: NC Republican makes her first ad all about AOC
The Michele Nix ad may preview what’s to come in 2020, as Republicans take aim at the rising Democratic star

From left, Reps. Jahana Hayes, D-Conn., Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Katie Hill, D-Calif, are seen after delivering a letter to the Russell Building office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., calling on the Senate to act on House passed legislation to reopen the government on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

North Carolina Republican Michele Nix, one of 17 Republicans running for the nomination in North Carolina’s 3rd District special election primary, has made New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez the focus of her first ad.

The ad could be a preview of what’s to come in 2020, as the freshman Democrat solidifies her place as the new boogeywoman in campaign messaging from Republicans.

Freshman Texas Republican in once-safe GOP district calls out Trump on McCain bashing
Rep. Chip Roy won 2018 midterm election by less than 3 points in largely suburban district

Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, and White House adviser Kellyanne Conway, are seen in the House Chamber before President Donald Trump delivered his State of the Union address in February. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A freshman Republican from Texas took a step not many other GOP lawmakers in his state’s delegation have taken: calling out President Donald Trump by name for his ongoing, post-mortem feud with the late Sen. John McCain.

“I disagree with the POTUS standing in front of M1A1 Abram tanks & the American flag and spending time trashing POW veteran and former US Senator McCain," Rep. Chip Roy tweeted late Wednesday.

Expect offshore drilling to play role in next week’s Interior secretary confirmation
The increased focus all but assures the plan will be part of Bernhardt’s confirmation next Thursday

The Atlantic Ocean is seen adjacent to President Donald Trump's beachfront Mar-a-Lago resort, the day after Florida received an exemption from the Trump Administration's newly announced ocean drilling plan on Jan. 11, 2018, in Palm Beach, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Democrats are pressuring acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt to release the department’s updated plan for opening the Atlantic Ocean to offshore drilling, foreshadowing an increased focus on a proposal opposed by lawmakers of both parties.

In a letter sent Wednesday, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, of New York, and 16 other Democratic senators asked Bernhardt to release details about the department’s draft five-year oil and gas leasing program for the Outer Continental Shelf, including which states will be included in the next version of the proposal.

Trump’s new order aims to protect conservative voices on college campuses
His education secretary, Betsy Devos, has warned about the dangers of ‘government muscle’ on issue

President Donald Trump announced an executive order he will sign Thursday afternoon during his two-hour appearance at CPAC 2019 on March 2 in National Harbor, Maryland. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump will sign an executive order Thursday aimed at protecting conservative voices on public and private college campuses, an issue that energizes his political base as he revs up his re-election campaign.

The order will direct the White House Office of Management and Budget to work with grant-issuing federal agencies to ensure higher learning institutions are adhering to the First Amendment, as well as laws, regulations and policies that are part of existing criteria for receiving federal monies. The EO will add free speech to those criteria.