SOCP

Meet the 10 Members of House Republicans’ DACA Task Force
Group holds varying immigration views, making road to compromise difficult

House Republicans want to ensure any legislation replacing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, would have the support of the majority of their conference before it goes to the floor.

That’s why Speaker Paul D. Ryan formed a task force featuring a cross section of Republicans who serve on committees with jurisdiction over immigration and border security to come up with a plan the conference can support.

McConnell Avoided Making a Promise He Couldn’t Keep
McCain’s health care announcement showed value of majority leader’s caution

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had intended to turn back to health care this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell never quite guaranteed a floor vote on the latest Republican effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law as the clock ticked toward an end-of-September deadline.

The Kentucky Republican’s office was measured last week when asked about the prospects for floor action, with the majority leader saying through multiple spokespersons that it was “the Leader’s intention to consider” the legislation drafted by Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana.

CHIP, FAA Face Deadlines This Week
Even with typical drama absent, funding cliffs still loom

South Dakota Sen. John Thune chairs the Commerce Committee, which approved an FAA authorization bill earlier this year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Congress is spared the usual end-of-the-fiscal-year drama this month, with normal fights over government spending punted until December, but lawmakers still face several deadlines before the Sept. 30 cutoff for fiscal 2017.

With the Republicans’ last-gasp effort to undo the 2010 health care law fizzling, Congress may now try to pass short-term extensions to avoid running aground on the Children’s Health Insurance Program, the Federal Aviation Administration and community health centers, authorizations for which expire at the end of the month. 

On North Korea, Some Lawmakers See Scattershot Trump Approach
‘It’s hard to figure out what the consistent message or the priority is’

People at a railway station in Seoul, South Korea, watch a television showing President Donald Trump on Aug. 9. (JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images File Photo)

One day, aggressively enforcing sanctions is the key to solving the North Korea issue. The next, President Donald Trump threatens to “totally destroy” the country. And some senior lawmakers are troubled by what they see as a lack of consistency from the commander in chief.

As the president vacillates between a sanctions-based approach that presses North Korea’s allies to do more and threats to take down the Kim Jong Un government along with its nuclear and missile programs, some top Democrats want Trump and his team to settle on a consistent strategy. But it appears there is little they can do to bring that about.

Opinion: Another Health Care Bill, Another Health Care Biff
Major rewrites of policy deserve more than partisan signoff

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer conducts a news conference in the Capitol on Sept. 18 to oppose the Graham-Cassidy legislation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Maybe we have finally established a lasting legislative principle for both parties: Don’t ever again try to pass major health care legislation using parliamentary gimmicks to avoid a filibuster.

The Democrats, under Barack Obama, followed this route in 2010 after they lost their filibuster-proof Senate majority when Republican Scott Brown unexpectedly won the special election to fill Ted Kennedy’s Senate seat. As a result, final tinkering and technical improvements could not be made in the Obamacare legislation using a House-Senate conference.

Proposed Changes to D.C. Circulator Would End Route Around Capitol Hill
Library of Congress encouraging people to take action against changes

A D.C. Circulator bus makes its way east on Pennsylvania Avenue Southeast on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The cheapest form of public transportation in Washington is the D.C. Circulator, at just $1 a ride. For Capitol Hill staffers and visitors, one Circulator route goes to Union Station, the Capitol, the Supreme Court and the Library of Congress.

But the District Department of Transportation’s 2017 Transit Development Plan Update includes a proposed modification of that route that would eliminate the Capitol Hill stops.

Word on the Hill: Busy Week
Your social calendar for the week

Events all over D.C. to explore this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Monday and welcome back.

This week is packed with things to do around the D.C. area.

New Democrats’ PAC Adds 12 Challengers to Candidate Watch List
Moderate Democratic group is stepping into races earlier this cycle

Harley Rouda is one of two Democratic challengers to GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher that the NewDemPAC is adding to its candidate watch list. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call File Photo).

The political arm of the moderate New Democrat Coalition is adding 12 House challengers to its list of candidates to watch in 2018. 

NewDemPAC’s recognition comes with a $1,000 contribution this quarter and guidance about messaging and strategy. The watch list is a way for the group to get involved in races earlier than it previously has. Last cycle, the PAC contributed about $1 million to federal candidates and it expects to give out at least that much this cycle. 

Trump Issues Revised Travel Restrictions on Eight Countries
Targeted nations are not satisfying new vetting standards, president says

The new restrictions on travelers from eight countries go into effect Oct. 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump on Sunday issued a revised travel ban targeting citizens of eight countries, adding North Korea, Venezuela and Chad to a list of nations the administration says pose a threat to national security.

Restrictions will remain on the majority-Muslim countries of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. Sudan was dropped from the list of countries originally targeted by sections of a March 6 executive order that expired Sunday.

Trump Pledges to Campaign for Moore if Strange Loses
Strange was originally a ‘no’ on repeal-and-replace efforts, president says

President Donald Trump is backing Alabama Sen. Luther Strange in the Senate GOP runoff. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump traveled south Friday night to urge Alabamians to vote for Sen. Luther Strange in next week’s Senate Republican primary runoff. But he said he would campaign for Strange’s opponent if Strange loses.

Strange, who was appointed to the seat, faces former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore on Tuesday to serve out the rest of former Sen. Jeff Sessions’ term. Sessions is now Trump’s attorney general. Moore has been leading in public polls, and Strange’s allies hoped Trump’s visit to the state could boost turnout in the senator’s favor.