Cost Isn’t Everything. Pentagon Should Judge Contractors on Cybersecurity, Report Says
Security would be ‘fourth pillar’ in weapons purchase decisions

Aerial view of the Pentagon building photographed on Sept. 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Pentagon should take into account the cybersecurity capabilities of defense contractors in addition to cost and performance measures when awarding contracts, a U.S. government-funded think tank recommended in a report published Monday.

Through its buying process, the Pentagon “can influence and shape the conduct of its suppliers,” the Mitre Corp. said in a report titled “Deliver Uncompromised: A Strategy for Supply Chain Security and Resilience in Response to the Changing Character of War.”

Helped Wanted: New Printer for 2020 Census
GPO solicits new bids after contracting snafu with previous printer

The Census Bureau doesn’t have a printer lined up for the upcoming 2020 Census. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Census Bureau is currently without a printer, less than two years before the national head count begins. That has left the Government Publishing Office to accept new bids for the 2020 census printing contract until Sept 10, after previously awarding the contract to a company that has since filed for bankruptcy.

The GPO intends to award the replacement printing and mailing contract in November. This timeline “will ensure there is no negative effect on the 2020 Printing and Mailing Operation or the overall 2020 Census,” according to a Census Bureau statement earlier this month.

Closing Arguments for Manafort Trial Set for Wednesday, If Jurors Can ‘Pay Attention’
Jury could decide former Trump campaign chairman’s fate as early as that evening

The closing arguments for the trial against former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort are set for Wednesday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Closing arguments for the Paul Manafort trial are set to begin Wednesday morning, Judge T.S. Ellis III said in court Tuesday.

The Eastern Virginia jury could decide as early as Wednesday evening whether the former Trump campaign chairman is guilty of any of the 18 counts he is facing on tax evasion and bank fraud.

Democrats Disgusted, Enraged by Trump’s Omarosa Comments
President called former White House aide a ‘dog’ in tweet

President Donald Trump on Tuesday launched another round of derisive comments against former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats in Congress condemned President Donald Trump’s latest batch of derisive comments toward Omarosa Manigault Newman, a former White House aide.

After a Tuesday morning tweet in which Trump called Manigault a “crazed, crying lowlife” and a “dog,” several House Democrats took consternation from insults they said were tinged with racial and misogynistic connotations.

Poll: Near Tie Between MacArthur and Democratic Challenger Kim
Monmouth poll shows the two within a point of each other in New Jersey’s 3rd District

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., is in a tough re-election race against former Obama administration official Andy Kim. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new poll in New Jersey's 3rd District shows Republican Rep. Tom MacArthur in a near-tie with Democratic challenger Andy Kim.

A Monmouth University survey of 401 voters in the district showed MacArthur has the support of 41 percent of potential voters, which includes those who voted since 2010 or are newly registered while Kim, who served in national security and counterterrorism roles in the Obama administration, had 40 percent. Another 15 percent of voters in the district are undecided.

Trump’s Turkey Spat Could Rouse Army of Well-Paid, Connected Lobbyists
Turkey has spent millions to promote its interests in Washington

Former Louisiana Congressman Jim McCrery, shown here in a file photo with former House Speaker Roy Blunt, R-MO., is one of numerous retired lawmakers who have signed lucrative agreements to lobby on behalf of Turkey.

Whatever the result of President Donald Trump’s tariff fight with Turkey, it is almost certainly going to rouse a well-financed and deeply entrenched influence peddling operation in Washington.

The Republic of Turkey spends hundreds of thousands of dollars a year on well-connected DC lobbyists to promote its interests in Washington. It makes major gifts to American think tanks that do not have to be reported under the Foreign Agent Registration Act. And it donates money to political candidates through PACs like Turkish Coalition USA.

Kim Schrier Secures Democratic Nod in Hotly Contested House Race
Washington’s 8th District is a top target for Democrats

Dino Rossi is the Republican nominee in Washington's 8th congressional district (D.A. Banks/CQ Roll Call file photo).

Pediatrician Kim Schrier secured the second-place spot to take on Republican Dino Rossi in Washington’s 8th District, which could be one of the most competitive races in the country. 

Schrier declared victory Wednesday morning, more than a week after the primary in Washington. The combination of a crowded Democratic field and mail-in ballots left the Democratic nomination in limbo as ballots were counted. 

Trump Won’t Follow Congressional Directives on Russia and Crimea
Defense authorization signing statement effectively discards restrictions recognizing Crimea as Russian

President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin answer questions about the 2016 U.S election collusion during a joint press conference after their summit in July. Trump now objects to efforts by Congress to prevent his administration from recognizing Crimea as part of Russia. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump objects to an effort by Congress to prevent his administration from recognizing Crimea as part of Russia.

Crimea is a region in Ukraine that has been occupied by Russia for several years, with the Russian Federation having claimed to have annexed the region in March 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin has claimed the territorial matter is settled, but many in Washington disagree.

Zeldin Again Takes on NFL Player Protests
Tells players to ‘stand up and show some respect’

Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., told NFL players to "stand up and show some respect" instead of kneeling for the national anthem. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Lee Zeldin is again taking on professional football players who protest during the National Anthem, telling them to “stand up and show some respect.”

The Republican, who served in the U.S. Army, posted an image of former San Francisco 49ers players Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid kneeling while showing soldiers holding them up.

Poliquin Again Amps Up Mailings Ahead of Election Deadline
Critics say it is an abuse of taxpayer dollars

Rep. Bruce Poliquin, R-Maine, is being accused of flooding his district with franked mail to improve his re-election prospects. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Bruce Poliquin is flooding Maine's 2nd District with congressional mailers.

Poliquin’s mailers highlight his work on the GOP tax legislation passed last year, the opioid crisis, and increasing consequences for sexual harassment on Capitol Hill, the Portland Press Herald reported.

Trump Calls Former Aide Omarosa a ‘Dog’
Says he gave a ‘crazed, crying lowlife a break’ in giving her a White House job

President Donald Trump listens to Omarosa Manigault Newman, then-director of communications for the White House Public Liaison Office, during an event to honor winners of the National Minority Enterprise Development Week Awards Program in October 2017. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump continued his attacks on his former ally and employee Omarosa Manigault Newman on Twitter on Tuesday, calling his former aide a “dog.”

Trump praised White House Chief of Staff John Kelly for firing his former director of communications for the White House Public Liaison Office and contestant on his show “The Apprentice.” 

What to Watch in Tuesday’s Primaries
GOP picks nominee in top Senate race; 2 Toss-up House races will be set

Minnesota Sen. Tina Smith faces a DFL primary challenge Tuesday from five other candidates, including former Republican Richard Painter. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

From New England to the upper Midwest, four states are hosting primaries Tuesday.

The most interesting contests are in Wisconsin and Minnesota, which both hold primaries for Senate and for several competitive House seats. And in two safe Democratic districts — one in Minnesota and one in Connecticut — primaries will likely pick new members of Congress.

7 Ways the Senate Can Spend the Rest of August
A few real problems have bubbled up while senators were away

There’s no shortage of things for senators to do while in town this month, Murphy writes. Above, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., arrives at the Capitol for a vote in April. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Welcome back to the grind, senators and staff. If you were only watching cable news over your abridged recess, you might have been lulled into the idea that the only messes in Washington you would come back to were Omarosa’s habit of recording conversations in the Situation Room and what we’ve learned so far about Paul Manafort’s choice of outerwear from his trial — ostrich. So gross.

But while some in the D.C. media were caught up in the Trump train wrecks of the day, a few real problems bubbled up while you were gone. Somebody has to deal with them, so as long as you’re here — why not you?

Education Department’s ‘Gainful Employment’ Repeal Carries High Price Tag
Topic could come up when Senate begins debating Education Department spending

Sen. Patty Murray criticized the Education Department proposal as turning its back on students and pushing costs to taxpayers. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration’s proposal to repeal Obama-era requirements for recipients of federal student aid comes with a price tag of about $5.3 billion over a decade, a figure that is already giving critics ammunition as the Senate prepares to turn to Education Department appropriations this week.

The administration’s proposed rulemaking would rescind 2014 regulations requiring colleges and universities to ensure graduates have low debt-to-income ratios or risk losing access to loans and grants that help students afford to attend their programs. The proposal will be open for a 30-day comment period once it’s published in the Federal Register on Tuesday before the department can turn to drafting a final rule.

Democratic Poll Shows Close Race for Pete Sessions’ Seat in Texas
GOP congressman faces Democrat Colin Allred in Dallas-area district

GOP Rep. Pete Sessions is facing Democrat Colin Allred in November. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

Texas Rep. Pete Sessions’ re-election race is looking increasingly competitive, with Democrat Colin Allred polling close to the longtime Republican lawmaker, according to a new internal Democratic survey.

The Dallas-area 32nd District is traditionally GOP territory. But this year’s race is considered competitive, in part because the 32nd is one of three Republican-held districts in the Lone Star State that Hillary Clinton carried in 2016. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rates the race a Toss-up