Technology & Innovation

Republicans Put Immigration Divisions on Hold for ICE Messaging Votes
GOP members still want to vote on family reunification, agriculture guest worker program

Immigration has bedeviled Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Republicans, but they will push messaging votes on it either this week or next. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lacking a unified strategy on most immigration policy, Republicans are looking to temporarily set aside their differences and highlight an issue that has divided Democrats. 

GOP leaders are planning two votes this week or next related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which some Democrats say they want to abolish.

GOP Messaging Vote on Democrats’ ‘Abolish ICE’ Bill Set to Backfire
Democrats prepared to vote ‘no’ and make debate about family separations

From left, Reps. Luis V. Gutiérrez, D-Ill., Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., John Lewis, D-Ga., Judy Chu, D-Calif., Al Green, D-Texas, Adriano Espaillat, D-N.Y., and others march in Washington on June 13 to protest the Trump administration’s family separation policy at the southern border. Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., appears in the back at center. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders are planning a vote this month on a progressive bill to terminate the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, but their plan to put Democrats on record on an issue that divides the minority party looks like it will backfire. 

Democrats say they’ll make the debate about families that have been separated at the border — an issue that needs a permanent legislative fix that Republicans do not yet have a solution for that can pass the House.

Marc Short Creates Another Void in the White House
Trump has ‘highest turnover of top-tier staff of any recent president,’ professor says

Marc Short, White House legislative affairs director, outside the Senate Republican policy lunches in the Capitol in January. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short will leave his post this summer after helping President Donald Trump secure tax cuts, a Supreme Court justice, eliminate part of the Obama-era health law, open the Arctic for energy extraction, and nix a slew of federal regulations.

Short — with his signature shaved head — was the most visible Trump administration official on Capitol Hill, often chatting with reporters as he traversed the hallways going from meetings with leadership and rank-and-file members about the president’s legislative whims and demands. Affable yet firm, Short seemed eager to joust with reporters on cable news, the Hill and even under the blistering summer sun in the White House’s north driveway.

More U.S.-Born Children Could Be Separated From Immigrant Parents
Trump administration wants to terminate TPS status for hundreds of thousands

Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., says he wants to protect Temporary Protected Status immigrants who came to the United States legally.  (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As lawmakers try to find a legislative solution to keep immigrant families together at the U.S.-Mexico border, an even bigger family separation challenge looms next year when thousands of parents with temporary residency status will face deportation and separation from their U.S.-born children.

The Trump administration has said it will terminate so-called Temporary Protected Status for nearly 60,000 Haitians in July 2019, more than 262,000 Salvadorans in September 2019 and 57,000 Hondurans in January 2020.

$177.1 Billion Labor-HHS-Education Moves Forward With Family Separation Changes
House Appropriations has approved 11 of 12 fiscal 2019 spending measures

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., wants the Labor-HHS-Education bill linked to the Defense bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Appropriations Committee late Wednesday evening approved, 30-22, a $177.1 billion fiscal 2019 bill to fund the departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services.

The committee has now approved 11 of its 12 fiscal 2019 spending measures, following the marathon 13-hour markup of the massive nondefense bill that left lawmakers from both parties exasperated at various points. The debate covered family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border, gun research funding, abstinence-only sex education and thorny political issues around religious adoption agencies.

Lankford: Reuniting Immigrant Families Is Complicated
Human traffickers and parents who aren’t ready to reunite with their children has made process more difficult

Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., said there are a number of complications for reuniting immigrant families. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As a California court deadline came and went Tuesday for the Trump administration to reunite 102 undocumented immigrant children under the age of 5 with their parents, Sen. James Lankford came to the administration’s defense after it did not fully meet the court’s demands.

Dozens of the children are still at temporary housing facilities as the Justice and Health and Human Services Departments vet those who have claimed to be the children’s parents through DNA tests, criminal background checks, and other means.

Putin Meeting Might Be ‘Easiest’ of European Swing, Trump Says
President: UK government is in ‘turmoil’ as he heads toward meeting with May and Queen Elizabeth

President Trump had tough things to say about America's European allies and less-than-critical ones for Russian President Vladimir Putin as he departed Tuesday morning for a week-long European swing. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday called Vladimir Putin “a competitor” when asked if the Russian president is a foe of the United States, adding that his Monday summit with Putin might be the “easiest” one of his trip.

Trump will first huddle with NATO allies in Brussels, and then head to the United Kingdom for meetings with Prime Minister Theresa May and Queen Elizabeth II. Because NATO allies have “taken advantage” of the U.S. and the U.K. government is in “turmoil,” in Trump eyes, he said this: “Frankly, Putin may be the easiest of them all.”

Lawmakers Still Being Kept out of Facilities With Immigrant Children
Democrats and Republicans wonder if feds are hiding something

Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Calif., is the latest lawmaker to be shut out from a tour of a facility holding undocumented immigrant children who were separated from their parents by the federal government. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers keep getting denied access to tour facilities holding undocumented immigrant children who have been separated from their parents, causing some to speculate whether the federal government is shielding the living conditions there from public scrutiny.

Most recently, Democratic Rep. Mark DeSaulnier was turned away Sunday from visiting a center in his district in Pleasant Hill, California, after previously receiving permission to tour the facility from an official in the Health and Human Services Department.

Pence to Democrats: Stop ‘Spurious Attacks on ICE‘
White House sees issue as winner for Republicans in midterms

Vice President Mike Pence on Friday visited U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters. Here, as VP-elect, he talks with 4-year-old Victoria Cruz, of Orlando, Fla., as he leaves a Senate Republicans lunch in the Capitol in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vice President Mike Pence on Friday continued the White House’s efforts to make a controversial border security agency known as ICE a major midterm election issue, saying it arrests “criminal illegal aliens” who are “poisoning our youth.”

“The president sent me here with a very simple message: I stand here before you at a time when some people are actually calling for the abolition of ICE. In this White House, we are with you 100 percent,” Pence said during remarks at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters in Washington. “Under President Donald Trump, we will never abolish ICE.”

Ryan, Huizenga Quarrel Over Civility of Immigrant Separation Debate
Republican Huizenga takes offense at Democrat Ryan’s calling separation policy ‘state-sanctioned abuse’

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, had a spat with Rep. Bill Huizenga, D-Mich., over the rhetoric surrounding undocumented immigrant children separated from their families at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Reps. Tim Ryan and Bill Huizenga had a brief spat at a news conference Thursday over the rhetoric surrounding undocumented immigrant children who have been separated from their parents.

Huizenga, a Michigan Republican, joined Ryan and two other Democrats on a visit to Bethany Christian Services in Grand Rapids, an organization providing room and board to some undocumented children.

Warren Smacks Trump Back Over DNA Test
Says president is ‘too incompetent’ to reunite migrant families in time to meet court order

Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren criticized President Donald Trump for his family separation policy in response to his questioning her heritage. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren ripped President Donald Trump on Twitter after he insulted her at a campaign rally in Montana.

On Thursday, Trump repeated his use of “Pocahontas,” a slur that he has used to demean Warren’s claiming Native American heritage.

Trump Escalates Attacks on ‘Crazy Maxine,’ Alleging Corruption
President warns of ‘infestation’ of MS-13 gang members that Dems call false

Reps. Paul Tonko, D-N.Y., and Maxine Waters, D-Calif., are seen after a meeting of the of House Democratic Conference in the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump provided some fireworks Tuesday morning even before Independence Day celebrations light up skies across America, calling Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters “crazy” and accusing her of corruption.

He also warned of an “infestation” of MS-13 gang members from points south of the United States, contending again that Democrats “do not appreciate” the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency that some of them want to abolish or significantly overhaul amid the migrant family separation crisis.

House Republicans Hope to Resuscitate Immigration Issue
July votes expected on family separation, and guest worker and E-Verify

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said GOP leaders will keep their promise for a July vote on an agriculture guest worker program and mandatory E-Verify and are also discussing legislation to address family separations at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans’ thorniest issue, immigration, is not going away after Wednesday’s embarrassing defeat of their “compromise” bill.

GOP leaders are planning votes in July on two more narrow bills that are also not guaranteed to pass. Some rank-and-file Republicans want to continue talks on a larger measure in hopes of finding an elusive path to passage. 

Jayapal Among Nearly 575 Women Arrested at Immigration Protest
Washington Democrat joined demonstrators to rally against border policies

Hundreds of women crowd the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building on Thursday to protest the Trump administration’s immigration policies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Washington Rep. Pramila Jayapal was among nearly 575 women arrested Thursday during a sit-in on Capitol Hill, as part of what organizers called a “mass act of disobedience” to show their frustration with the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

“I'm proud to have been arrested with them, to put myself in the camp of people who believe that the United States of America is better,” Jayapal, a Washington Democrat, said in a video posted on Twitter after her arrest. 

Trump Hits Heitkamp as High Court, ‘Maxine’ Become Midterm Issues
‘A vote for any Democrat is a vote for Schumer, Pelosi and Maxine,’ president says

President Donald Trump took his midterm campaign tour to North Dakota on Wednesday night, where Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp faces a tough re-election fight. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Just a few days ago, California Rep. Maxine Waters and Supreme Court Justices Anthony M. Kennedy and Neil Gorsuch did not feature heavily in Donald Trump’s midterm campaign spiel. But Wednesday night, the president made clear that has changed in a major way.

Air Force One touched down in Fargo, North Dakota, just hours after Kennedy informed Trump during a White House meeting of his decision to retire next month after three decades on the high court. And the president wasted no time in painting North Dakota’s junior senator, Democrat Heidi Heitkamp, as an automatic “no” vote on any nominee he picks to replace the “swing vote” justice.