Aaron Schock

Former Rep. Schock Asks Judge to Throw Out Case
Attorney says prosecutors are playing ‘Monday morning quarterback’

Former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., resigned from Congress in 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

An attorney for disgraced former Rep. Aaron Schock sought Thursday to dismiss federal fraud and theft charges stemming from his time in office, saying the indictment “repeatedly trespasses on land the Constitution reserves for Congress.”

Prosecutors say Schock used campaign and government funds for personal expenses — including travel and the lavish redecoration of his Capitol Hill office in the style of the popular television show, “Downton Abbey.” The Republican, first elected in 2008, resigned from his seat representing Illinois’ 18th District in May 2015.

Schock’s Attorneys Claim FBI Broke the Law
Former staffer helped the feds build corruption case against former congressman

Lawyers for former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., claim that his constitutional rights were violated when a former staffer worked as an informant for the FBI. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Disgraced former Rep. Aaron Schock’s legal team claims that a staffer working as an informant for the FBI broke the law.

The staffer provided emails, credit card receipts, and other documents that helped the feds make a case against Schock, Fox News reported,but Schock’s lawyers say this violated his constitutional right against unreasonable search and seizure.

Aaron Schock Pleads Not Guilty To Slew of Federal Charges
Former Illinois congressman resigned in 2015

Former Illinois Republican Rep. Aaron Schock told reporters he was confident that “justice will prevail.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock pleaded not guilty Monday to a number of federal fraud and theft charges stemming from his tenure in the House of Representatives. 

Schock was indicted last month on 24 counts, including charges of wire fraud, mail fraud, theft of government funds, making false statements, filing false reports with federal election officials and filing false tax returns. 

Aaron Schock Indicted on Theft, Fraud Charges
Illinois Republican faced scrutiny over "Downton Abbey" style office on Capitol Hill

Ex-Rep. Aaron Schock was indicted on charges of theft, fraud, making false statements and filing false tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Aaron Schock, who resigned his seat last year amid scrutiny over his spending, has been indicted on charges of theft, fraud, making false statements and filing false tax returns, the U.S. attorney in Springfield, Illinois, Jim Lewis, said in a statement Thursday.

The 24-count indictment dates from as far back as 2008 to October 2015, months after the Illinois Republican left Congress. Schock allegedly defrauded the government, campaign committees and submitted false claims, invoices and vouchers to the House.

Ex-Rep. Schock Agrees to Fine for Fund Request
Illinois Republican asked Cantor for five times the limit

Former Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock still faces federal charges over how he spent campaign funds while in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Four years after improperly asking a Republican leader for $25,000, former Rep. Aaron Schock has agreed to pay a $10,000 civil penalty to the Federal Election Commission.

The settlement “was reached to avoid the delay and expense of litigation,” a spokesman for McGuireWoods, Schock’s law firm, told the Chicago Tribune.

Chaka Fattah's K Street Friends Stand by Him
Through thick and thin, lobbyists tend to stick with their allies

Pennsylvania Rep. Chaka Fattah received $29,000 in contributions after his indictment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lobbyists and lobbying organizations gave money to former Rep. Chaka Fattah through the end of April of this year, nine months after he was indicted in a racketeering conspiracy that later ended the Pennsylvania Democrat's congressional career, according to contribution disclosures filed with the Senate.

In June 2016, a federal jury in Philadelphia convicted Fattah of conspiracy, money laundering and of using campaign funds to pay off his son’s student loans, forcing his resignation from the House. In total, the congressman’s campaign received 15 donations from lobbyists after his indictment. He also received additional contributions in his name through the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, which he chaired.

Aaron Schock Returns to Hill for Indian Prime Minister
Former Illinois congressman was in the House chamber for rare address

Former Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock on the House floor after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed a joint meeting of Congress on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As House members and senators gathered for a rare joint meeting with India's prime minister Wednesday, Aaron Schock made his presence known .  

The former Illinois congressman stood in the seventh aisle, among members, as senators walked into the House chamber for the meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India.  

Some Other Times Staffers' Social Media Rants Embarrassed the Boss
#NeverTweet or post on Facebook, for that matter

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's former Butler is being investigated by the Secret Service for his social media rantings. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Donald Trump's campaign got some unwelcome press after a report  revealed that his former butler Anthony Senecal had made a series of racist Facebook posts that threatened President Barack Obama and are now the subject of a Secret Service investigation.  

Immediately, Trump's campaign disavowed Senecal's statements and said he had not been in Trump's employment since 2009. Of course, this is not the first time a politician's staff member's social media rants have embarrassed the boss.

Schock Recounts Office Redecorating Timeline

Schock dings the Chicago Tribune on social media. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., has some words to say about the press Monday morning.  

Congressional Hits and Misses: Best of 2015

Congressional leaders attend a ceremony honoring the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War in July. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

From throwing snowballs to threatening constituents to quoting Taylor Swift, Roll Call presents the year's best moments from Capitol Hill you just had to see one more time.