Adam B Schiff

3 takeaways: Weekend reinforces that Trump is his own communications director
President spends weekend retweeting of conservative lawmakers, pundits after Bill Shine’s departure

Fox News Channel and radio talk show host Sean Hannity interviews President Donald Trump before a campaign rally at the Las Vegas Convention Center on Sept. 20. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — Bill Shine, the former Fox News executive, is no longer White House communications director. But President Donald Trump’s weekend messaging shows he might not need to fill the position.

Trump returned to the White House Sunday evening after a weekend at his South Florida resort without speaking to reporters. Several shouted questions about his new request that lawmakers give him $8.6 billion for his proposed U.S.-Mexico border barrier. A Roll Call reporter asked about Michael Cohen accusing the president of lying when he claimed his former fixer lied about not asking him for a pardon.

As Dems rev up investigations, Trump declares ‘the campaign begins’
President again says legislation unlikely to move as opposition party’s probes get serious

President Donald Trump shows reporters Space Policy Directive 4 after he signed it on Feb. 19 in the Oval Office. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday said House Democrats’ decision to launch multiple investigations of him and his associates — including a massive documents request — marks the start of the 2020 campaign season.

“They want to do that instead of getting legislation done,” Trump told reporters during a veterans event at the White House. “Basically they've started the campaign. So the campaign begins.”

Ty Cobb called Mueller an ‘American hero’ in a new interview. Here are 5 key takeaways from it
White House lawyer said investigations into Trump could go on forever

Robert Mueller testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Dirksen Building on oversight of the FBI during his tenure as director. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former White House lawyer Ty Cobb opened up about his experience helping President Donald Trump navigate the special counsel investigation of Robert S. Mueller III for nearly 11 months.

In a winding interview with ABC News released Tuesday, the attorney called Mueller an ‘American hero.’

Trump threatens gridlock as House investigations heat up
“They won’t get ANYTHING done for our Country!” the president tweeted Tuesday morning

President Donald Trump, flanked from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S. Dak., and Vice President Mike Pencestops to speak to the cameras following his lunch with Senate Republicans in the Capitol on Wed. Jan. 9, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump suggested anew Tuesday that major legislation is unlikely while House Democrats are investigating him and his associates.

A day after Democrats won control of the House, the president warned he would create gridlock in Washington by going to a “war-like posture” if he determined their probes of his 2016 campaign, businesses and presidency were going too far.

What have Trump and Putin talked about? Democrats intend to find out
House Democratic chairmen set March 15 deadline for White House, State to produce documents and schedule interviews

House Democrats want to know what  President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin have been talking about.  (Chris McGrath/Getty Images file photo)

House Democrats announced an expanded investigation Monday into President Donald Trump’s personal communications with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, requesting documents and interviews from people who might have information about those encounters.

The president has reportedly seized notes from at least one of his face-to-face meetings with Putin — notes Democrats believe may have been destroyed — and instructed an interpreter not to share details of the two men's conversation with other senior aides.

Some House Oversight Democrats pumping the brakes on interviews with Trump family members
Some members feel a public spectacle might not be the best place for following threads from Michael Cohen’s testimony

President Donald Trump points to the crowd after accepting the GOP nomination for president at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Behind him are, from left, daughter Ivanka Trump, her husband Jared Kushner, daughter in law Vanessa Trump, and son Donald Trump Jr. The president's former lawyer, Michael Cohen, implicated three of Trump’s children and Kushner in possible criminal activity Wednesday in a House Oversight Committee hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After Chairman Elijah Cummings suggested earlier this week that his House Committee on Oversight and Reform could try to schedule interviews with members of the Trump family, including the president’s sons Donald Jr. and Eric and daughter Ivanka, some Democrats urged caution about making such moves.

The president’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen implicated Trump’s family members in multiple crimes in his public testimony on Wednesday. Specifically, Cohen described Donald Jr. and Eric’s involvement in an illegal hush money scheme to buy the silence of two of the president’s former mistresses, onetime Playboy model Karen McDougal and pornographic film actress Stephanie Clifford, better known by her stage name Stormy Daniels.

Congress glad Trump walked in Vietnam, but questions trust in Kim Jong Un
Criticism of his accepting Kim’s denial of knowledge of Otto Warmbier’s treatment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is among the lawmakers who supported President Donald Trump’s decision to walk away from the talks with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Members of Congress are glad President Donald Trump didn’t emerge from his meetings with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with a bad bargain, but some are blasting the president’s taking the dictator at his word about the deadly treatment of U.S. citizen Otto Warmbier.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, for instance, said she’s “glad that the president walked away” from the North Korean leader’s offer to denuclearize only if the United States lifted all sanctions against his country.

Cohen implicates Trump’s sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, in mistress hush money scheme
Trump’s former lawyer and fixer was asked if he is aware of any other illegal acts that haven’t come to light

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies to the House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This is a developing story. Follow this page for updates on the latest from the Cohen hearing.

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, said Wednesday that Trump’s business operation is being investigated for illegal acts that haven’t yet been publicly disclosed.

Engel promises tough oversight of Trump's North Korea nuclear talks
House Democrats are ready for a deal, but only if it offers permanent denuclearization

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., participates in the House Democrats’ news conference on the “NATO Support Act” before its consideration on the House floor on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration must be more transparent about its North Korea policy if it wants congressional support for implementing any nuclear agreement that could come out of this week’s summit in Hanoi, the chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee said Monday.

Chairman Eliot L. Engel, D-N.Y., said House Democrats are ready to be constructive partners in implementing a possible U.S.-North Korea nuclear deal, but only if it offers a credible path toward Pyongyang’s permanent denuclearization.

5G technologies could challenge US spy agencies
“They’ll be swimming in an ocean of data that they can’t begin to parse,” Himes says

Extraordinary data speeds with little delay are one of the key promises of 5G technology. (David Becker/Getty Images file photo)

An avalanche of new technologies enabled by 5G wireless networks and artificial intelligence will pose new challenges for U.S. spy agencies as they strive to stay ahead of adversaries. These new technologies are set to fundamentally alter how data is collected, stored, and transmitted.

“We would find ourselves at a disadvantage relative to our opponents around the globe if we didn’t adopt and adapt” to these technological advances, said Rep. Jim Himes, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee’s newly created Strategic Technologies and Advanced Research Subcommittee. The panel will focus on how U.S. intelligence agencies use emerging technologies. “Are we adopting and adapting technology within the intelligence community as rapidly as we need to?” is among the questions it intends to probe.