Barry Loudermilk

Rep. Loudermilk in Car Accident Returning From Irma Response
Georgia Republican and his wife told to return home to Georgia for additional treatment

Rep. Barry Loudermilk  was in his district in Georgia to respond to Hurricane Irma. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Georgia, and his wife were in a car accident on Tuesday and flipped his car multiple times on his way to Washington, D.C., from Georgia.

The congressman and Desiree Loudermilk were driving on 1-40 when another car rear-ended him on Interstate 40 near Knoxville, Tennessee. Rep. Loudermilk’s office said the congressman was driving at the time of the wreck.

House GOP Push to Reverse Course on Spending Strategy Fails

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., don’t appear to have the votes to pursue a 12-bill omnibus spending package. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House GOP appropriators’ and other rank-and-file members’ last-minute push to vote on a full 12-bill spending package before the August recess has failed to garner enough support for leadership to reverse course.

The now twice-made decision to proceed with a four-bill minibus package of national security-related appropriations bills instead of a 12-bill omnibus is a blow to those in the Republican Conference who saw pursuing a 12-bill strategy a win.

Democrats Reclaim Congressional Baseball Title, Bipartisanship Rules
Night ends with gracious hand-over of trophy

California Rep. Jimmy Panetta slides in safe at home as GOP catcher Rep. Rodney Davis of Illinois tries to apply the tag during the the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats regained their mojo on Thursday night at Nationals Park with a commanding 11-2 victory over the Republicans at the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game.

But with the tragic shooting during the Republicans’ team practice the day before, esprit de corps was the main game plan for both teams, dispelling for at least a night, the clouds of highly charged partisanship that has plagued both sides of the aisle this year.

Republicans Target D.C. Gun Laws in Wake of Shooting
GOP lawmakers want reciprocity for concealed carry permit

Rep. Thomas Massie and other Republicans want D.C. to allow concealed carry permits for firearms. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Kentucky Rep. Thomas Massie and 23 other GOP lawmakers on Thursday introduced a bill responding to the congressional baseball practice shooting that would allow individuals with concealed carry permits from other states to carry guns in the District of Columbia.

While the baseball practice shooting took place in Virginia, a state that already has a gun reciprocity law, the sponsors of the bill argue that it is the District’s law that prevented lawmakers and staff from being armed during practice since they were traveling to and from Washington.

Baseball Shooting Raises Lawmaker Protection Questions
Incident prompts discussion of security at practices and the Capitol

Alexandria Police line the street with police tape across the street from Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Va., where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot during baseball practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Members of Congress know they could be targets of violence, but they didn’t see it coming at their early morning practice for the Congressional Baseball Game.

“It was absolutely a safe space. We get up at 5:30 in the morning, just to go play baseball,” said Rep. Mike Bishop. “It does rattle your sense of what’s safe and what isn’t.”

Members Describe Shooting: Baseball Field Became ‘Killing Field’
Players describe terror, confusion as gunman opens fire on Republican team practice

Tennessee Rep. Chuck Fleischmann tells reporters about the scene at the Republicans’ baseball practice on Wednesday in Alexandria, Virginia, where a gunman wounded five people, including Majority Whip Steve Scalise. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY LINDSEY MCPHERSON AND ERIC GARCIA

Republican congressmen described frantic efforts to find cover as they felt like “sitting ducks” when a gunman opened fire on them during their practice Wednesday in Alexandria, Virginia, for the Congressional Baseball Game.

New Faces on Congressional Baseball Teams — Including a Woman
2016 election leads to some roster moves on both sides

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, left, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise celebrate after the Republicans' 8-7 victory in the 55th Congressional Baseball Game in 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There will be a few new faces on the field at the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game on June 15.

The teams begin practice with a few freshman lawmakers on their rosters and some players lost in the shuffle of the 2016 election.

Cybersecurity a Top Priority for the Capitol
‘There is no doubt we are a target,’ says House CAO Philip Kiko

Capitol Police Chief Matthew R. Verderosa and other officials say that cybersecurity is a top priority at the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House officers, the Capitol Police, the Library of Congress and the Architect of the Capitol have all made cybersecurity a top priority for fiscal 2018, officials told a House committee at hearings through Tuesday on their Legislative Branch spending bill budget goals. 

“The increased amount of state-sponsored activity waged against the United States underscores the serious threat posed by malicious actors, constantly attempting to exploit IT vulnerabilities,” House Chief Administrative Officer Philip G. Kiko told the House Administration Committee. “There is no doubt that we are a target.”

Word on the Hill: Happy Holidays
See you in 2017!

Oklahoma Rep. Markwayne Mullin, right, gives a tour of the Capitol Rotunda to friends on Tuesday. Let us know what other members are up to over the holidays. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Whether you’re staying in D.C. or traveling, I hope you enjoy the holidays and have a Happy New Year!

Word on the Hill will be on a break until Jan. 3, 2017.

Nearly Half of Votes for Advancing IRS Impeachment Came From Outside the Freedom Caucus
Some leadership allies supported moving forward on impeachment resolution

Republican Policy Committee Chairman Luke Messer of Indiana and several allies voted against a motion to refer a resolution to impeach IRS Commissioner John Koskinen back to the Judiciary Committee. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Nearly half of the 72 Republicans who voted against a motion that effectively blocked a resolution to impeach IRS Commissioner John Koskinen are a not part of the House Freedom Caucus.

The caucus has led the push to remove Koskinen.