Bob Casey

Regular Order? Maybe Not For Alexander-Murray Bill
A markup could open door to partisan battle over the 2010 health law

Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., ranking member, are seen during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing in Dirksen Building titled "Examining How Healthy Choices Can Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Costs," on October 19. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A committee markup of a bipartisan health bill from Sens. Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray could add another potentially fatal complication for the measure that is already under significant pressure.

Senators from both parties have for months decried the lack of regular order in the chamber as Republicans tried to jam through legislation to repeal the 2010 health law.

Kid Rock’s Stage and Screen Path to Political Spotlight Well-Worn
Reagan was the prototype, but many have tried to follow his lead

President Ronald Reagan set the bar for entertainers who aspire to political office. He is shown here at his inauguration in 1981. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Ronald Reagan was perhaps the highest-profile entertainer who decided to give politics a try.

Bipartisan Tax Bill More Durable, GOP Says After White House Meeting
Toomey sees overlap, but Democrats show little enthusiasm

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, seated left, South Dakota Sen. John Thune, seated center, and Pennsylvania Sen. Patrick J. Toomey, standing center, were among the Finance Committee members who met with President Donald Trump on Wednesday about a tax overhaul bill. Also pictured, Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, standing right. (Chris Maddaloni/Roll Call File Photo)

After huddling Wednesday with President Donald Trump and a handful of Democrats, Senate Republican tax writers said an overhaul bill that secures bipartisan support would be more “durable” than a GOP-only path. 

Senate Republicans are moving ahead with plans to ensure a tax bill could pass with as few as 50 GOP votes, with Vice President Mike Pence casting the tie-breaking vote. But after a White House meeting with Trump and five Senate Finance Committee Democrats, three GOP members on that panel said they agree with the president that a bipartisan bill is preferable.

Who Benefits From the State and Local Tax Deduction?
Roll Call analysis finds higher-income earners reap substantial returns from the deduction

Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch is among the “Big Six” Republican tax negotiators. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

A fight within the Republican Party over a proposal to eliminate the state and local tax deduction threatens the future of the GOP effort to overhaul the U.S. tax code.

Battle lines have been drawn, as lawmakers from states that see substantial benefit from the deduction — such as New Jersey and New York — are already sounding alarms at the proposal to remove it. 

Trump Wants Democratic Support for Tax Bill but Slams Party
President addresses audience of long-haul truckers in Pennsylvania

President Donald Trump waves to journalists as he leaves the White House Wednesday to pitch the White House-GOP tax overhaul bill to long-haul truckers in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday again made clear he wants some Democratic support for an emerging White House-GOP tax overhaul bill. But he then accused Democrats of supporting massive tax hikes.

Speaking to an audience of long-haul truckers Wednesday evening in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Trump pledged to convince Republican lawmakers and “maybe some of those Democrats” to vote for the plan.

Measuring the Odd Couples of the Senate
What happens when a state sends one Democrat and one Republican to the chamber?

Pennsylvania Sens. Patrick J. Toomey, left, a Republican, and Bob Casey, a Democrat,are the second most likely pair of same-state senators to cancel out each others votes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Several states have, by virtue of electing senators of opposite parties, virtually nullified their power in the Senate.

Even Senators Hate Robocalls
Aging Committee hearing focuses on scam calls to seniors

Maine Sen. Susan Collins said she has disconnected her home landline because of robocalls. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Even senators are plagued by their home phones ringing off the hook with inappropriate and even illegal robocalls.

“My husband and I received so many on our landline in Bangor that we discontinued the landline,” Maine Republican Susan Collins said Wednesday.

Frustrated Democratic Staffer Leaves Capitol Hill to Run for Office
Former aide to Sen. Bob Casey is running for Maryland House of Delegates

Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey, right, consults with then-staffer Jared Solomon, left, at a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing in 2016. (Courtesy Jared Solomon)

Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey, like most high-profile Democrats lately, has been encouraging young people to get more involved in public service. One of his staffers decided to take his advice.

Three weeks ago, Jared Solomon, 32, left his role as Casey’s legislative assistant and policy adviser to run for the Maryland House of Delegates as a Democrat.

Alexander Juggles Bipartisan Health Care Deal With GOP Repeal Effort
His decision could undermine a reputation the Tennessee Republican has spent years cultivating

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has been trying to assemble support for a measure to stabilize the health insurance industry, but could run into interference because of GOP efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act . (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For Sen. Lamar Alexander, two roads are diverging in a yellow wood.

The Tennessee Republican, who chairs the Senate, Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, is facing a difficult quandary on health care that Democrats say could undermine a bipartisan reputation he has spent years cultivating and simultaneously determine the fate of the nation’s insurance system.

Barletta Announces His Candidacy for Senate
Was a vocal supporter of Trump, who encouraged him to run

In a video announcing his Senate campaign, Pennsylvania Republican Rep. Lou Barleta echoes some of President Donald Trump’s themes. (LouBarletta.com)

Barletta made the announcement in a video on his website after months of speculation that he would challenge the two-term incumbent.

Barletta had been encouraged to run for the Senate by President Donald Trump, whom Barletta vocally supported. Trump became the first Republican presidential candidate to win Pennsylvania since George H.W. in 1988.