Bradley Byrne

Trump Warns GOP Members of Political, Policy Pitfalls of Killing Health Bill
President calls out Freedom Caucus Chairman Meadows in closed-door meeting

President Donald Trump and HHS Secretary Tom Price arrive in the Capitol to meet with the House Republican Conference on Tuesday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY MCPHERSON, JOHN T. BENNETT AND REMA RAHMAN, CQ ROLL CALL

President Donald Trump came to the Capitol Tuesday morning to make a closing pitch to House Republicans preparing to vote on health care legislation that will define the beginning of his presidency. And he did it with the confidence, jest and bravado that only he can deliver.

Key Conservatives Come Around on GOP Health Plan
Republican Study Committee leaders sign off, but Freedom Caucus still wary

Walker and several members of the Republican Study Committee voiced their support for the GOP health plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Several key Republicans on Friday endorsed the health care overhaul bill crafted by GOP leaders and the White House, saying President Donald Trump had agreed to changes they favored minutes earlier during an Oval Office meeting. With a vote on the so-called American Health Care Act scheduled for this coming Thursday in the House, the news was welcomed by supporters of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

Reps. Hurd and O’Rourke Make Bipartisan Buddy Movie
“The longest cross-country livestream town hall in the history of the world’

Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, left, and Republican Rep. Will Hurd left San Antonio at 7 a.m. CDT Tuesday. (Courtesy Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s Facebook page)

With a major winter storm on the East Coast canceling flights across the country, two congressmen decided to have a bipartisan adventure on their way back to Washington.

Democrat Beto O’Rourke and Republican Will Hurd rented a car and left San Antonio at 7 a.m. CDT on the road to D.C.

Trump Rescinds Obama-Era Guidance on Transgender Students
Move affects pending SCOTUS case on transgender bathroom use

Under the previous guidelines by the Obama administration, public schools were told to allow transgender students to use the bathroom consistent with their gender identities. (Sara D. Davis/Getty Images file photo)

The Trump administration on Wednesday withdrew Obama-era guidance directing public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity, a move that changes a pending Supreme Court case on the contentious social issue.

A letter from the administration to the Supreme Court on Wednesday included a memo from the Education and Justice departments formally withdrawing the guidance.

Word on the Hill: Trailblazer Awards
Astronaut is testifying in the House

Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings will receive a Trailblazer Award from the Congressional Black Associates. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

This Black History Month, the Congressional Black Associates will honor five people for their contributions to the community in their annual Trailblazer Awards ceremony.

This year’s awardees are Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., and Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, and Hill veterans Michael McQuerry, Jaqueline Ellis (posthumously) and Jennifer DeCasper.

Sessions’ Nomination Sets Off Political Jockeying for Alabama Senate Seat
Governor was scheduled to meet with congressional delegation Friday

Alabama Rep. Robert Aderholt had already asked his state’s governor to appoint him to a possible vacant Senate seat, should Sen. Jeff Sessions accept a Cabinet position. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Donald Trump’s decision to nominate Alabama Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions for attorney general has the Yellowhammer State’s politicians eyeing their next moves. 

Sessions’ selection wasn’t unexpected. As one of Trump’s earliest and most vocal defenders on Capitol Hill, he had long been mentioned as a top pick for various Cabinet positions. That speculation set off plenty of angling among the state’s GOP politicos before Friday’s announcement. 

Chaffetz Sixth Member to Reverse Course and Back Trump
His seat's safe, but Utah has become an unlikely White House battleground

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he won't defend or endorse Republican presidential candidate, but he will vote for him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jason Chaffetz of unexpected-presidential-battleground Utah has become the sixth Republican member of Congress to reverse his repudiation of Donald Trump.

The chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee said Wednesday he would vote for the GOP presidential nominee because he’s slightly preferable to the Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton.

Facts Hard to Come by on Guantanamo Detainees' Dangers
Some say email to senator was not a complete representation of what the government knows

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., said she" fought tooth and nail" to get transparency from the Obama administration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If U.S. officials have a reliable assessment of how many Guantanamo Bay detainees are likely to be jihadists after being transferred to other countries, they won’t reveal it to the public.

The risk of Guantanamo prisoners returning to the fight has been a critical national security issue and will remain one for the next president and Congress. But Washington policymakers can’t even agree on what the official assessment of that danger is.

Who Trump Could Expect to Support His Term Limits Proposal
A few dozen members of Congress support legislation calling for term limits

Kentucky Rep. Andy Barr introduced legislation last year, calling for term limits on senators and House members. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s proposal to impose congressional term limits is unlikely to attract many allies in a Congress where he already has few. But there are still a few dozen Republicans he could likely count on to back the idea.

Congressional term limits can only be imposed through the adoption of a constitutional amendment. Nine Republican members of Congress have introduced several resolutions calling for such an amendment, collectively garnering a few dozen GOP co-sponsors.

Republicans in Congress Against Trump
Most have expressed concerns with party's nominee after video surfaced

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Panama City Beach, Florida on Tuesday. (Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)

To date, 53 Republican members of Congress have publicly declared their opposition to Donald Trump, their party's presidential nominee.

They have either said explicitly that they will not vote for him, withdrawn previous endorsements or called on him to abandon his candidacy. (Some in that last group haven’t said how they’ll vote if Trump doesn’t drop out.)