Capitol Police

Booze, Prohibition and the Man in the Green Hat: An Original October Surprise
Undercover Capitol takes you inside the historic workplace — one video at a time

Mitch McConnell Thanks Capitol Police Following Kavanaugh Chaos — But Takes Aim at the Left
Senate Majority Leader decries ‘mob tactics’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thanks Capitol Police Tuesday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday praised Capitol Police  for their work as Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court was underway — but also took a few verbal shots at the “far left.”

“To the men and women of the United States Capitol Police and all the other law enforcement officers who kept members, staff and citizens safe, even in extremely difficult and often hostile circumstances, we really can’t thank them enough,” he said in his opening remarks on the Senate floor.

Tensions Over Kavanaugh Drive Senate Into Tightened Security
Online posting of personal information, Capitol altercations prompt bigger footprint

There is a heightened security posture on Capitol Hill as tensions rise over the Brett Kavanaugh nomination to the Supreme Court. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tensions over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh and sexual assault allegations against him have driven the Senate to a heightened security posture, as some lawmakers fended off protesters and others saw their personal information released online.

Demonstrators, many of them sexual assault survivors, have flooded the Capitol in recent days to share their stories and urge Republican senators to reject the Kavanaugh nomination. Close-up exchanges between protesters and senators, including in elevators and at airports, have led to additional security measures, especially for Senate Judiciary Committee members.

Threats Against Jeff Flake and Chuck Grassley Prompt Additional Security
Move comes amid contentious debate over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Jeff Flake is under additional security in response to threats against him. (Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

At least two key Republican senators who found themselves in the center of a firestorm last week over Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court have been assigned special protection due to threats as well as crowd control issues. 

Multiple Capitol Police officers confirmed Friday that teams of uniformed officers were moving with Sens. Jeff Flake and Charles E. Grassley. The latter chairs the Judiciary Committee, which heard testimony Thursday from Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused the nominee of sexual assault decades ago when both were in high school. Flake, a Judiciary member, helped broker a deal to delay a floor vote on Kavanaugh to allow for an FBI investigation into allegations against him by Ford and others. 

56 Arrested Demonstrating Support for Christine Blasey Ford
Protesters rally against nomination of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

Capitol Police arrested 56 protesters who were demonstrating support for Christine Blasey Ford.(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Police arrested 56 protesters Thursday who flooded Senate office buildings  to voice opposition to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and express support for his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.

Thirty-three protesters were arrested outside of Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley’s office in the Hart Building on Thursday afternoon. The demonstrators were charged with “crowding, obstructing, or incommoding.” Earlier in the day, Capitol Police arrested 23 protesters outside the Dirksen Building office of Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker for “unlawful demonstration activities.” They faced the same charges.

Secret Service Buying a Harley-Davidson, Despite Trump’s Calls for Boycott
President has supported a boycott of the company

The Secret Service is buying a Harley-Davidson motorcycle, despite the president calling for a boycott. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Secret Service is still buying Harley-Davidson motorcycles, even though President Donald Trump has supported a boycott of Harleys if the company moves some motorcycle production overseas.

The Secret Service posted their intention to purchase a single Harley-Davidson motorcycle, “brand name only, with police equipment accessories” earlier this week. The procurement solicitation paperwork was posted on a website for businesses who contract with the federal government.

What Congress Wants to Study and ‘Explore’ About Itself
Dunkin’ Donuts, horse mounted police and leaky Cannon tunnel all will get consideration

Congress wants studies on police horses, flooding in the Cannon Tunnel, Senate child care and more. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

What to do with some basement ambience, Horse-mounted police and Dunkin’ Donuts are but a few questions appropriators want answered as they look to fund Congress and its agencies to the tune of $4.8 billion.The fiscal year 2019 appropriations conference committee report released Monday includes reporting requirements and requests for studies and explorations. Here are just a few: 

Conferees had some real talk about the tunnel that connects the Cannon House Office Building to the Capitol:“The current condition of the Cannon tunnel is that of a basement ambience,” said the report, “Furthermore the tunnel is subject to leaks which have recently caused the tunnel to be closed.”The report directs the Architect of the Capitol and the  Clerk of the House to develop a comprehensive plan to “enhance the tunnel,” including cost estimates, timeline, and renderings.

70 Protesters Arrested At First Kavanaugh Hearing
Supreme Court nominee’s initial day of confirmation proceedings defined by disruption

Seventy protesters were arrested for disrupting business during the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Police arrested 70 protesters Tuesday at the first day of the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.  

Of the total, 61 were removed by Capitol Police from the Hart Office Building room where Senate Judiciary Committee members were giving opening statements for more than seven hours. Those arrested were charged with disorderly conduct.

Paying Respects to McCain at the Capitol? Here’s What You Need to Know
Expect road closures and long lines

The public can pay its respects to the late Sen. John McCain in the Capitol Rotunda on Friday, Aug. 31. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The public can pay its respects as Sen. John McCain lies in state in the Capitol Rotunda Friday, Aug. 31, between 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. Public viewing will follow a private ceremony at 11 a.m.

Visitors must enter through the Capitol Visitor Center on the East Front of the Capitol. Attendees can start lining up Friday morning on First Street Northwest and Southwest, between Constitution and Independence avenues, or on Second Street Northeast and Southeast, between East Capitol Street and Independence Avenue Southeast.

Makeshift John McCain Memorials Not Welcome on Capitol Hill
Security concerns about accumulated items prompts removal

Flowers, flags and other items left to memorialize Sen. John McCain will be cleared away by Capitol Police. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A small makeshift memorial including flowers and a Navy cover were left on the steps of the Russell Senate Office building over the weekend by people honoring the late Sen. John McCain. But displays like this won’t last long, say Capitol Police.

Ken Farnaso, a staffer for Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.,  posted a photo Sunday afternoon of bouquets outside of the Senate office building where McCain’s D.C. office is.