Carlos Curbelo

GOP Health Care Bill Picks up ‘A Few’ Moderate Supporters
Vote on Friday possible if more support comes together

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., arrives for the meeting with President Donald Trump and the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON, JOE WILLIAMS and LINDSEY McPHERSON 
CQ Roll Call

House leadership secured the support of a few moderate holdouts for their health care bill during a late-night meeting Wednesday.

Moderates Hedge On New Obamacare Repeal Amendment

Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., makes his way to Speaker of the House Paul Ryan's office in the Capitol on Thursday, March 23, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Moderate Republicans are not embracing the latest Republican amendment to the party’s GOP health care overhaul.

Some GOP Lawmakers Push Back Against EPA Cuts
Decimating environmental agency could hurt — even in Trump country

President Donald Trump’s recent budget blueprint proposes eliminating roughly 3,200 positions at the EPA along with 50 programs. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

As President Donald Trump introduces a series of budget cuts and regulatory rollbacks that would cripple the Environmental Protection Agency, he faces one unpredictable obstacle: resistance from fellow Republicans.

A small but vocal number of GOP lawmakers have rallied in support of popular programs in their districts, including clean water programs in the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay, that are among the biggest losers in the budget Trump proposed to Congress last month.

Lawmakers Predict GOP Bill Will Be 2018 Campaign Issue
Republicans may still be tethered to a bill that was never put to a vote

Former National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Greg Walden leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference where Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced the vote for leadership’s health care plan had been canceled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated March 25

Republicans won’t have a recorded vote on leadership’s health care plan but that doesn’t mean their position on it won’t be used against them in campaign ads in 2018. 

Advocacy Group Targets 29 Republicans Ahead of Health Care Vote
American Action Network is making a final six-figure push in support of AHCA

American Action Network’s latest digital campaign targets Florida Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who has come out against leadership’s health care plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

An advocacy group with close ties to House leadership is launching a final push to pressure 29 Republicans to support the GOP health care plan ahead of an expected vote later this week.

Some of those lawmakers have indicated they won’s support the bill.

Rising Waters at Home Cause Republicans to Buck Party in D.C.
Moderate Republicans are out front on climate change threat

New York Rep. John J. Faso is one of several GOP freshmen concerned about climate change. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Whipping out his iPhone, New York Rep. John J. Faso scrolled through text messages from his wife until he found the photo he sought. 

“There’s my wife’s car in the driveway,” he said, pointing to a lump covered in snow. “So there was no climate change that we were worried about in the last couple of days.”

GOP Outside Group Pressures Vulnerable Members on Health Care Plan
American Action Network has now spent $10 million on repeal and replace campaigns

American Action Network is running ads in California Rep. David Valadao's district encouraging him to keep his promise to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The day after the Congressional Budget Office announced 14 million more Americans would be uninsured under House GOP leadership’s health care plan by 2018, a major ally of leadership is hitting the airwaves to defend the plan and the members it needs to back it. 

American Action Network is launching $1.5 million in TV ads Tuesday that will air nationally on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” and in 15 congressional districts across the country, about half of which Hillary Clinton won last fall. 

Democrats Call on Republicans to Condemn King’s Anti-Immigrant Comments
Conservative congressman tweeted ‘We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies’

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, tweeted support for a far-right European candidate, saying "we can't restore civilization with somebody else's babies." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats are calling on Republicans to condemn Rep. Steve King for his anti-immigrant comments on Sunday and Monday while few of his colleagues are defending him.

“Republican Congressman Steve King’s vile racism has no place in decent society, much less in the U.S. Congress,” Drew Hammill, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s spokesman said in a statement.  “But once again, disgusting hatred has been met with deafening silence from Speaker [Paul D.] Ryan.”

Why Some House Republicans Could be Taking a Risk on Obamacare Repeal
The 11 GOP members who have the most constituents on Obamacare

These 11 members of Congress represent the Republican districts with the greatest percentage of constituents enrolled in government insurance exchanges. They are (clockwise from upper left): Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., Brian Mast, R-Fla., Francis Rooney, R-Fla., Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, Gus Bilirakis, R-Fla., Bill Posey, R-Fla., Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., Rob Woodall, R-Ga.

As House Republicans rolled out their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act this week, some members of the conference found themselves stuck between their constituents and their colleagues.

Eleven House Republicans, who will be expected by party leadership and the White House to support their party’s replacement plan, represent districts where at least 6 percent of their constituents are enrolled in government insurance exchanges set up by the 2010 health care law, according to a CQ Roll Call analysis of Kaiser Family Health Foundation and Census Bureau data. 

Democrats Delight in Delaware Special Election
Party hopes turnout boost in legislative race marks beginning of a trend

Democrat Stephanie Hansen’s victory in Delaware last week kept the state Senate in Democratic hands. (Courtesy Hansen for Senate)

From the women’s marches to town hall protests, Democrats are starting to feel emboldened about their prospects in the midterms. A recent special election for the state Senate in Delaware only added to Democratic optimism, but the realities surrounding the race are more sobering.

Democrat Stephanie Hansen, a former New Castle County Council president, scored a 58 percent to 41 percent victory over Republican realtor John Marino last weekend. The win was described as “critical” by Daily Kos Elections, considering control of the Delaware state Senate was hanging in the balance. Democrats were specifically encouraged by a boost in turnout, particularly for a special election in February.