Carlos Curbelo

Here’s How Republicans Reacted After Trump (Again) Flip-Flopped on Charlottesville
Many in president’s own party countered his stance

A man carries an American flag during a protest against racism and the violence over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 14, 2017 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

An unprecedented outpouring of congressional Republicans reacted Tuesday as President Donald Trump flipped his position (again) on last weekend’s violent outburst in Charlottesville, Virginia.

First Trump held “both sides” responsible just after protesters demonstrating in support of a General Robert E. Lee statue clashed with counterprotesters. Then a prepared speech Monday had the president condemning white supremacists, neo-Nazi’s and the violence generally. Finally, Tuesday night Trump came back to two-sided rhetoric when he said some members of the far-right organized demonstration were “very fine” people.

Will Hurd: Trump Should Apologize for Charlottesville Remarks
Hurd and other vulnerable members speak out

Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, is a vulnerable House Republican. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Will Hurd called on President Donald Trump to apologize for his latest remarks on recent violence sparked by a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Hurd, who is African-American, is also one of the most vulnerable House Republicans.

“Nobody should doubt whether the leader of the free world is against racism, bigotry, neo-Nazis and anti-Semitism,” Hurd said in an interview on CNN Thursday evening.

Far-Right Protesters in Virginia Included ‘Very Fine’ People, Trump Says
Trump says ‘both sides’ to blame for Charlottesville unrest

President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower on Tuesday. He appeared to defend some of the white supremacist groups who help spawn deadly violence Saturday in Virginia. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday defended some of the neo-Nazis and white supremacists who were part of the deadly Charlottesville, Virginia, protests last weekend, saying there were “very fine people” on both sides of the racially charged unrest.

A defiant Trump, just a day after slamming the pro-white groups who organized the two-day protests of the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, appeared to give some of their members cover. “There is blame on both sides,” he told reporters during what amounted to a brief impromptu press conference at Trump Tower in New York.

Carlos Curbelo Gets Democratic Challenger Who Emigrated from Ecuador
Debbie Mucarsel-Powell lost a state Senate bid last fall

Debbie Mucarsel-Powell said the same opportunities that allowed her immigrant family to get ahead “are disappearing for far too many of us today. (Debbie Mucarsel-Powell via Facebook)

Despite winning his second term by double digits, Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo is a top Democratic target in 2018. Democrats now have a candidate against him in Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, who announced her candidacy on Wednesday. 

Mucarsel-Powell has spent the past 14 years working in development at Florida International University. She moved to the U.S. from Ecuador when she was 14, settling first in southern California with her mom, and later following her sister to Florida.

Scaramucci Out as White House Communications Director
’The Mooch’ did not survive Kelly’s first day as chief of staff

Incoming White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci talks with reporters during "Regional Media Day" at the White House July 25, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and ERIC GARCIAUpdated at 5:32 p.m. | White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci has been removed from the Trump administration on new Chief of Staff John Kelly’s first day on the job, as the retired Marine four-star general seeks to lessen the chaos in the West Wing.

Scaramucci “does not have a role at this time in the Trump administration,” Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters during a late-afternoon briefing.

Senate Gives House Republicans Little Cover on Health Care in 2018
Some House GOP lawmakers trusted Senate to improve legislation

Rep. Carlos Curbelo said Friday he has no regrets about voting for the House version of the health care repeal and replace bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo voted for the Republican health care bill this spring, he did so believing the Senate would make it better. 

“I received strong assurances that major improvements would be made in the Senate,” the two-term congressman wrote in a May Miami Herald op-ed explaining his vote. 

Fred Upton Might Join Bipartisan Climate Caucus

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., might join a bipartisan climate change caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A House caucus that supports legislation to combat climate change may be joined by key Republican energy influencer who would raise its credibility among GOP lawmakers.

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., the former Energy and Commerce chairman who leads the committee's energy panel, is considering joining the bipartisan 48-member Climate Solutions Caucus, a group equally divided between Democrats and Republicans.

FEC Suing Former Rep. Rivera
Alleges he used unreported campaign funds to prop up spoiler candidate in primary

The FEC alleges former Rep. David Rivera used unreported funds to try to prop up a spoiler candidate in the Democratic primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Meet the Dogs of the House, Round II
Canine friends in Curbelo, Hoyer, Denham, Bridenstine, Ways and Means, and O’Halleran’s offices

Lily Denham goes to work with her owner, California Rep. Jeff Denham. (Courtesy Denham’s office)

Looking for a nonpartisan, furry friend? Check out out the halls of Congress.

In May, we featured a few House dogs who regularly hang out either as official “office dogs,” or because they belong to staffers who enjoy bringing them to work. Due to popular demand, we are back with more.

Congressional Republicans Criticize Trump’s Comments About TV Anchor
President tweeted he turned down meeting as Mika Brzezinski was ‘bleeding badly from a face-lift’

Kansas Rep. Lynn Jenkins said President Donald Trump’s remarks about MSNBC host Mike Brzezinski were “not okay.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:59 p.m. | Republican members of Congress criticized President Donald Trump for his comments about TV host Mika Brzezinski on Thursday.

Trump tweeted early in the day that he turned down a meeting with Brzezinski and her “Morning Joe” co-host Joe Scarborough because she was “bleeding badly from a face-lift.”