celebrities

Word on the Hill: Party Time
Burgers in Cannon today

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks with her husband, Paul, center, and Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey at an Atlantic/CBS News pre-party before the 2016 White House Corespondents’ Association Dinner. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner is a day away. But Friday is a big night for parties to start the weekend off.

RealClearPolitics, the Distilled Spirits Council, the National Restaurant Association and the Beer Institute are joining for the first annual Toast to the First Amendment. It is from 7 to 10 p.m. at the National Restaurant Association, 2055 L St. NW.

Three Celebrities on Capitol Hill for Three Reasons
Rob Thomas, Billy Hurley III and Huw Collins on why they came to D.C.

Athletes Billy Hurley III, left, and Dan Jansen, right, at a National Golf Day event in the Rayburn House Office Building. (Courtesy WE ARE GOLF)

This week on Capitol Hill, a musician, an athlete, and an actor came out to lobby for causes specifically important to them.

Singer Rob Thomas came to discuss the challenges facing songwriters and federal regulations on licensing and was joined by other singers including Peter Frampton.

HOH’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner Party List
See what is and isn’t going on this year

Music producer Steve Aoki, left, talks with actor Keegan Michael Key at the Yahoo/ABC News party in the Washington Hilton before the White House correspondents’ dinner on April 30, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s party time again in Washington, D.C., as the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner quickly approaches.

The dinner is April 29 and the bulk of parties surrounding the event start on Thursday, most of which are invite-only, closed parties.

Rising Stars 2017: Administration Staffers
A mix of fresh and familiar Washington faces

Four Trump administration staffers are among CQ Roll Call’s 17 Rising Stars of 2017. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Over the course of this week, CQ Roll Call is taking a look at 17 Rising Stars of 2017 — people who will now wield power and influence in a Washington that has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump.

Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene. They include members of Congress, congressional and administration staffers, and advocates.

8 Things I Think I Think After the Georgia Special Primary
There’s never just one takeaway

The June runoff between Jon Ossoff and Karen Handel in Georgia’s 6th District is rated a toss-up by Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales. (Photos by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

My family sat down for dinner at a nice Amish family’s house in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night, less than two hours before the polls closed in Georgia’s 6th District. And Jon Ossoff’s name didn’t come up once. That’s not surprising, but it is what happens when special elections collide with Spring Break.

The most-watched special election of the cycle (until the next one) ended with the young Georgia Democrat finishing first with 48 percent, in the all-party primary but short of the what he needed to win former Republican Rep. Tom Price’s seat outright. Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel finished second with almost 20 percent and both candidates move on to the June 20 runoff.

After GOP Forces Runoff for Georgia House Seat, Trump Says Dems 'Failing'
President: Race now ‘Hollywood vs. Georgia’

Karen Handel, who faces Democrat Jon Ossoff in a runoff for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District seat, speaks with diners during a campaign stop at Rhea's restaurant in Roswell, Ga., on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Hours after Republicans held off a Democratic bid to take over a long-safe GOP Georgia House seat, President Donald Trump says the outcome shows Democrats are “failing.”

Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff fell about two percentage points shy of hitting the 50 percent threshold he needed to take the special election for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District on Tuesday outright. He now will face Karen Handel, a former GOP Georgia secretary of state who led Republican candidates with just under 20 percent of the tally, in a runoff.

Ossoff Not Getting Much Cash From Liberal Hollywood
Celebrity supporters include Jane Fonda and Wonder Woman

Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff poses for a selfie with campaign volunteers as they head out to canvass the 6th District on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans have tried painting Georgia Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff as a “darling of out-of-touch Hollywood celebrities,” but that’s largely an exaggeration, according to his latest campaign finance reports.

His Federal Election Commission filings show most celebrities who gave to the Democratic front-runner in Tuesday’s 6th District special election are not big-name Hollywood donors.

Word on the Hill: National Pet Day
TMZ spots Ryan, and a disco survivor is coming to the LOC

Play with some pets in D.C. today. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If you have a pet, give him or her a little extra love today on National Pet Day.

If you don’t have a pet, Pets and Pints will have more information about your adoption options.

Actors Drive People to Vote For Ossoff
NRCC hits Christopher Gohram and Alyssa Milano for not being from Georgia

Actors Christopher Gorham, left, and Alyssa Milano drove voters to the polls for Democratic congressional candidate Jon Ossoff. (Alyssa Milano/Twitter)

Actors Christopher Gorham and Alyssa Milano took the words “voter drive” literally as they drove people to vote early for Democrat Jon Ossoff in Georgia.

But Republicans said the celebrities’ volunteering in an out of state race was an example of how out of touch the Democrat is with the district.

Massive Eisenhower Memorial Could Break Ground as Early as September
Congressional support among the last barriers after 20-year dispute

An artist’s rendition of the vista from the Eisenhower Memorial looking toward the Capitol. (Courtesy Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

Construction could begin as early as September on a proposed memorial for President Dwight D. Eisenhower that has been mired in controversy for almost 20 years. 

That’s according to the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission and the chairman of the House committee that oversees the funding for the project.