Chris Stewart

Report: Chaffetz Might Leave Congress Early
Statement comes after Oversight Committee chairman announced he would not run in 2018

Jason Chaffetz said Thursday that he could leave Congress before the end of his term in 2018, Utah radio station KSL reported.

The comment comes in the wake of the Utah Republican’s surprise announcement on Wednesday that he would not run for reelection, or any other office, in 2018.

Network of Mormons on Capitol Hill Lend Each Other a Hand
Ryan Martin and Gordon Larsen revived Latter-day Saints Staff Association

Gordon Larsen, right, and Ryan Martin are the co-chairmen of the Latter-day Saints Staff Association. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Once a month, a group of Mormon staffers make it a point to have lunch together on Capitol Hill.

Like other staffer groups, the Latter-day Saints Staff Association is based around building a network. But this one is connected by faith. 

Who Trump Could Expect to Support His Term Limits Proposal
A few dozen members of Congress support legislation calling for term limits

Kentucky Rep. Andy Barr introduced legislation last year, calling for term limits on senators and House members. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s proposal to impose congressional term limits is unlikely to attract many allies in a Congress where he already has few. But there are still a few dozen Republicans he could likely count on to back the idea.

Congressional term limits can only be imposed through the adoption of a constitutional amendment. Nine Republican members of Congress have introduced several resolutions calling for such an amendment, collectively garnering a few dozen GOP co-sponsors.

Republicans in Congress Against Trump
Most have expressed concerns with party's nominee after video surfaced

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Panama City Beach, Florida on Tuesday. (Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)

To date, 53 Republican members of Congress have publicly declared their opposition to Donald Trump, their party's presidential nominee.

They have either said explicitly that they will not vote for him, withdrawn previous endorsements or called on him to abandon his candidacy. (Some in that last group haven’t said how they’ll vote if Trump doesn’t drop out.)

Congress Publishes Long-Secret Chapter of 9/11 Report
So-called "28 pages" explored alleged Saudi links to 9/11 hijackers

A US Capitol Police sharpshooter, lower right corner, keeps watch with his binoculars during the 9-11 Remembrance Ceremony on the Capitol steps on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After 14 years, Congress on Friday lifted the veil of secrecy that has shrouded a long-classified chapter of a congressional investigation into the 9/11 attacks, publishing the so-called "28 pages" that explore alleged Saudi links to the hijackers.  

The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence released the document Friday afternoon after a unanimous vote to do so. Congress received a redacted version of the chapter earlier in the day from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.