corporations

Republicans Use Past Democratic Tax Proposals as Ammo
Supportive Democrats eyed for current tax effort

Republicans are pointing out that Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, among other Democrats, previously supported aspects of a still-developing GOP tax plan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans have a new strategy to attack Democrats on a still developing tax measure: using past legislation against them.

The campaign could be successful. Some Democrats say the GOP argument makes sense, and several say they are open to the possibility of supporting a final tax bill.

Trump Wants Democratic Support for Tax Bill but Slams Party
President addresses audience of long-haul truckers in Pennsylvania

President Donald Trump waves to journalists as he leaves the White House Wednesday to pitch the White House-GOP tax overhaul bill to long-haul truckers in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday again made clear he wants some Democratic support for an emerging White House-GOP tax overhaul bill. But he then accused Democrats of supporting massive tax hikes.

Speaking to an audience of long-haul truckers Wednesday evening in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Trump pledged to convince Republican lawmakers and “maybe some of those Democrats” to vote for the plan.

Opinion: A Fake Senate Hearing on Fake News
What if the Intelligence Committee took up the president’s request

North Carolina Sen. Richard M. Burr, right, and Virginia Sen. Mark Warner lead the Senate Intelligence Committee, which President Donald Trump called on recently to look into “Fake News Networks.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Under Donald Trump’s interpretation of the Constitution, when the president tweets, the Senate must take action immediately.

So it was with Trump’s pointed suggestion last week, filled with the kind of oddball capitalization normally found in ransom notes: “Why Isn’t the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR country to see why so much of our news is just made up-FAKE!”

Eisenhower Memorial Given the Final Go-Ahead to Begin Construction
Groundbreaking date tentatively set for early November

An artist’s rendition of the vista from the Eisenhower Memorial looking toward the Capitol. (Courtesy Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

That wasn’t so hard now, was it?

After 17 years of bickering among lawmakers, U.S. Fine Arts commissioners, National Capital Commission planners, and a family with the last name Eisenhower, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission finally has the go-ahead to break ground on an ambitious four-acre park to enshrine the supreme allied commander in World War II and 34th United States president.

GOP Tax Messaging Heavy on Business Benefits
‘It all leads to the same end,’ speaker said of trickle-down effect of tax legislation

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Rep. Andy Harris speak to employees at Dixon Valve & Coupling Company about the GOP’s still developing tax legislation. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

CHESTERTOWN, Md. – “Cutting taxes is great for the businesses to make businesses more money. But how is that going to lower my taxes, or make sure it comes down to me?” That was the question a 20-year-old Dixon Valve & Coupling employee posed to Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Thursday.

Visiting the company’s headquarters to promote the GOP’s still developing tax legislation, Ryan told the employee that he plans to lower taxes on individuals so they take home more of their paychecks. Then he quickly pivoted back to his primary message.

On Tax Overhaul, Public Support Hard to Find
Economist/YouGov survey shows opinions all over the place

From left, Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., Senate Finance Committee chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., participate in the Congressional GOP media availability to unveil the GOP tax reform plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Despite the enthusiasm for overhauling the tax code among Republican congressional leaders and President Donald Trump, the public is hardly sold on the idea that the effort is a priority or on its possible benefits. 

Nearly one-third of respondents to a new Economist/YouGov survey strongly opposed the GOP tax framework released last week, and nearly the same number believed their own taxes would stay the same under the plan.

McMorris Rodgers Fields Tax Overhaul Questions Via Twitter Q&A
House GOP chairwoman is the first member of leadership to use the tool

Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers took questions on Twitter about the Republicans’ tax overhaul plan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republicans have rolled out their new tax overhaul plan, and Americans may have some questions.

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers took to Twitter to take questions through the Twitter Q&A tool, which allows her to respond to tweets by video. The House Republican Conference chairwoman is the first member of leadership to explore this option.

Scott Catches Heat for ‘#KeepYoMoney’
Video endorsing GOP tax plan offends some, liked by others

Sen. Tim Scott became the face of the Republicans’ tax overhaul hashtag. (Senate Republicans via Twitter)

Some people took issue with a video the Senate Republicans’ official Twitter account posted of Sen. Tim Scott endorsing the new tax framework released yesterday.

The video introduces Scott with a funkadelic overture that fades into a background beat as the South Carolina Republican explains how the GOP tax plan aims to “[help] the average American take home more of their pay” and “[grow] the economy long-term.”

Democrats Oppose ‘Massive Tax Cuts,’ Trump Tweets
President wonders about Dems: ‘How does that win elections?’

Sen. Ron Wyden, left, waits for Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to arrive for a Wednesday press conference on the GOP tax reform plan, which they oppose. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Appearing to react to the opposition party’s criticism of his tax overhaul framework, President Donald Trump on Thursday declared “Democrats don’t want massive tax cuts.”

A day after Trump and congressional Republicans rolled out a blueprint for corporate and individual tax rate reductions and code changes, the GOP president went after Democrats, even as he a day earlier pressed them to get on board with tax legislation he wants to sign before the end of the year.

GOP Unified on Tax Overhaul — for Now
Freedom Caucus clears path to move forward

From left, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Utah Sen. Orrin G. Hatch and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at Wednesday’s unveiling of the GOP tax overhaul framework. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Most rank-and-file Republicans seemed pleased initially with the tax overhaul framework their leadership presented Wednesday, but the nine-page document leaves a lot of questions unanswered that could unravel GOP unity in the weeks and months ahead.

Key among the remaining questions is how much revenue the tax plan would raise or lose, the answer to which will determine how much of their legislation can be made permanent policy under the budget reconciliation rules.