Dave Reichert

Controversy Lingers Over Capitol Art Competition
Deadline for student art submissions is Thursday

Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr. passes by the painting by Missouri high school student David Pulphus after it was rehung in the Capitol tunnel in January. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Submissions to this year’s Congressional Art Competition for high school students close on Thursday while the controversy from last year’s contest still hasn’t dissipated.

Debate still lingers over the painting by David Pulphus, a constituent of Rep. William Lacy Clay, that depicted police-community relations in Ferguson, Missouri. Some Republican members took matters into their own hands and removed the painting from where it hung with others in the Capitol tunnel.

Lawmakers Predict GOP Bill Will Be 2018 Campaign Issue
Republicans may still be tethered to a bill that was never put to a vote

Former National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Greg Walden leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference where Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced the vote for leadership’s health care plan had been canceled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated March 25

Republicans won’t have a recorded vote on leadership’s health care plan but that doesn’t mean their position on it won’t be used against them in campaign ads in 2018. 

Rising Waters at Home Cause Republicans to Buck Party in D.C.
Moderate Republicans are out front on climate change threat

New York Rep. John J. Faso is one of several GOP freshmen concerned about climate change. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Whipping out his iPhone, New York Rep. John J. Faso scrolled through text messages from his wife until he found the photo he sought. 

“There’s my wife’s car in the driveway,” he said, pointing to a lump covered in snow. “So there was no climate change that we were worried about in the last couple of days.”

For the GOP, a Dangerous Gamble on the All-Important Town Hall
Old-school constituent connections work best, but the anger is proving tough to withstand

Police escort California Rep. Tom McClintock through a town-hall audience in Roseville, California, last Saturday. (Randall Benton/The Sacramento Bee via AP)

Consider 10 and 19 as two more figures that help illustrate the risky congressional Republican strategies of passivity, defensiveness and avoidance during the first month of the Trump administration.

Ten is the total number of GOP lawmakers who have town hall meetings scheduled next week, the longest period Congress will be back home since the inauguration.  

Groups Join Forces to Protect Job-Provided Health Insurance

Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, holding a "Make America Great Again" hat, leaves the House Republican Conference meeting in the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans are ramping up their consideration of a controversial policy to reduce tax breaks for employer-sponsored health insurance, drawing increasing ire from a diverse coalition of business and labor groups.

The idea of scaling back the tax benefits for the more than 155 million people who get their coverage at work is generating so much concern that it has united those groups in staunch opposition. 

The Incredible Shrinking Split Tickets
Midterm campaign field starts with just 35 crossover House districts

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller is the only Republican up for re-election in 2018 in a state not carried by Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For the latest evidence of the nation’s polarized politics, the granular returns from November offer these slivers of bright purple insight:

Voters in just 35 congressional districts, or 8 percent of the total, elected a House member from one party while preferring the presidential candidate of the other party — the second election in a row where the share of ticket-splitting seats was in the single digits. Before that, 1920 was the last time the number of such crossover districts fell below one out of every nine.

Trump Executive Actions Put Leaders on the Spot
In twist, Democrats cheer TPP-killing move as Republicans squirm

Donald Trump greets President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. Three days later, Trump set up conflicts with his own party’s leaders by killing Obama’s Asian trade pact. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump began unraveling major parts of his predecessor’s legacy on Monday, but some of his first proclamations and actions as president immediately put him at odds with his own party’s congressional leaders.

The new president mingled Monday evening with Republican and Democratic leaders in the White House’s ornate State Dining Room, the kind of social event Barack Obama rarely hosted at the executive mansion.

Clay: Taking Down Ferguson Painting is ‘Unconstitutional’
Missouri congressman will keep controversial painting in his office

Reps. Cedric Richmond, far left, and William Lacy Clay, center, continue to defend a Missouri student's painting. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. William Lacy Clay said the taking down of a Capitol high school art competition painting of police-community relations in Ferguson, Missouri, is unconstitutional.

After a week of hanging and unhanging, the painting was removed from the Cannon tunnel on Tuesday.

Heard on the Hill This Week: The Saga of the Student Painting Heist
 

Throughout a week filled with heated confirmation hearings and a late-night vote-a-rama, one story continuously dogged Roll Call’s Heard on the Hill reporter Alex Gangitano: some lawmakers kept taking down a controversial student painting in the Cannon tunnel. Watch the video for a play-by-play from Gangitano.

Ryan Calls Ferguson Painting ‘Disgusting’ ]

Ferguson Painting Coming Down Again
Controversial piece, subject of tug of war between Democrats and Republicans, determined to violate rules

The controversial painting by Missouri student David Pulphus depicts police officers as animals. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol high school art competition painting of police-community relations in Ferguson, Missouri, which was the subject of a tug of war between Democrats and Republicans last week, is coming down.

The painting, which depicts police officers as animals, was ruled to be in violation of House Office Building Commission rules and will be taken down after the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, Washington GOP Rep. Dave Reichert said, accroding to CNN.