Dean Heller

Lawmakers Seek to Restore Internet Privacy After Repealing It
Move comes after waves of consumer concerns

Legislation by Tennessee Rep. Marsha Blackburn would restore some of the internet regulations Republicans in Congress just repealed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House and Senate lawmakers are hoping to push legislation to replace recently repealed Obama-era internet privacy regulations, a move by the Federal Communications Commission that has led to a tide of consumer complaints.

At least two Senate bills are being drafted to address the regulatory void and public outcry created last month when congressional Republicans repealed internet privacy rules issued by the FCC last year, using the Congressional Review Act. With the repeal, internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon can use and sell their customers’ online internet activity for marketing purposes unless consumers specifically request to opt out.

2018 Senate Recruitment: Too Early to Talk About It?
Challengers in tight races typically take their time to announce

Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner chairs the National Republican Senatorial Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With the 2018 midterm elections about 18 months away, attention is shifting to the battle for the Senate — and who could emerge as potential challengers.

But history shows that prospective contenders have a few more months before they typically announce their candidacies.

New Mail Campaign Highlights AHCA Impact on Older Voters
Save My Care highlights higher cost for seniors under GOP bill in two GOP districts

Older voters in Amodei’s district will be reminded of his health care vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Older voters in two GOP districts are the targets of a new direct mail campaign highlighting higher costs for seniors under the GOP health care bill.

The liberal advocacy group Save My Care is launching a direct mail campaign this weekend aimed at 30,000 voters between the ages of 50 and 64 in Arizona’s 2nd District, home to Rep. Martha McSally, and Nevada’s 2nd District, represented by Rep. Mark Amodei

Trump Denies Pressuring Comey to End Flynn Probe
President repeats claims investigation is a witch hunt

President Donald Trump continued to claim the investigation into Russia and the circumstances of his firing James B. Comey are a witch hunt. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and JOE WILLIAMS

President Donald Trump denied pressing former FBI Director James B. Comey to drop a criminal investigation of his first national security adviser, and said his campaign did not collude with Russia.

White House Turmoil Ramps Pressure on Vulnerable Republicans
Some are speaking out, others still waiting for more facts

Virginia Rep. Barbara Comstock, seen here with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan last year, said she cannot defend the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By BRIDGET BOWMAN and SIMONE PATHÉ

No matter what he did or how much he tweeted during his first four months in office, President Donald Trump has mostly held on to the loyalty of congressional Republicans — even those who might have the most to lose at the ballot box next year. 

After Sacking Comey, Trump Faces Lowest Approval Ratings Yet
Poll for End Citizens United shows support for independent Russia investigation

President Donald Trump delivers keynote address during the commencement at Liberty University on Saturday in Lynchburg, Va. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

A new poll shows President Donald Trump’s approval rating has fallen to its lowest level since his inauguration.

The poll from Public Policy Polling, which was conducted for the liberal group End Citizens United, found Trump’s approval seriously underwater, with only 39 percent approving of his job performance and 56 percent opposed.

Political Reaction to Comey Strikes Familiar Pattern
Democrats see opportunity, Republican responses vary

FBI Director James B. Comey’s firing has appeared to knock the issue of the GOP health care bill off the front pages. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A familiar pattern emerged after President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James B. Comey: Democrats pressured Republicans to weigh in, vulnerable Republicans tried to distance themselves, and others stayed quiet.

With the 2018 midterms still 18 months away, political operatives in both parties say it’s difficult to predict what issues will dominate the campaigns. But what followed Comey’s dismissal suggests that both parties may be continuing strategies they developed during last year’s elections: Democrats seek to tie Republicans to Trump, and Republicans try to stay above the the fray of the ever-changing news cycle. 

Super PAC Revives Ads Targeting GOP Senators on Russia
American Bridge’s ads are focused on Heller and Flake

Sen. Dean Heller is running for re-election in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A Democratic Super PAC is re-airing digital ads calling on two Republican senators to back an independent probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, following former F.B.I. Director James B. Comey’s firing Tuesday night.

Comey was leading the agency’s investigation into Russian interference and whether President Donald Trump’s campaign team colluded with the Russians. Trump fired Comey Monday night, purportedly for how he handled an investigation into Hillary Clinton, raising questions about the future of the Russia probe.

Some Democrats ‘Adopt a District’ to Talk Health Care
At least 4 House Democrats have held or plan to hold events in GOP districts

New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney talks with constituents during a town hall in Newburgh, N.Y., on June 11, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One House Democrat was in enemy territory Monday night, and he was on a mission.

“I’m Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney,” the New York lawmaker told a crowd gathered at an industrial event space in Kingston in a neighboring Empire State district. “Where the heck is your congressman?”

Word on the Hill: Race Car Driver Makes Stop
A few options for things to do this evening

Get your photo taken with NASCAR star Danica Patrick on the Hill on Wednesday. (Courtesy danicapatrick.com)

NASCAR driver Danica Patrick will be on Capitol Hill today for a meet and greet to promote life insurance’s role in American’s lives.

The event, hosted by the Financial Security and Life Insurance Caucus, is at 1:30 p.m. in the Cannon House Office Building, Room 121.