Diane Black

Take Five: Drew Ferguson
Georgia Republican doesn’t want to be a politician

Georgia Rep. Drew Ferguson was a dentist who served as mayor of a small town in Georgia before running for the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Drew Ferguson, 50, came to Congress after serving as mayor of West Point, Georgia, for eight years. The Republican freshman talks to HOH about getting into politics, becoming a dentist, and advocating term limits.

Q: What made you want to be a politician?

Republicans Reverse Course, Open Door To Another Health Care Debate
Ryan: ‘We are all going to work together and listen together until we get this right’

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., speaks during his press conference to announce the canceled vote on the American Health Care Act of 2017 on Friday, March 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON, JOE WILLIAMS and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Tuesday he isn’t abandoning his quest to overhaul the 2010 health care law, even after his first attempt to pass such legislation ended in catastrophic failure on Friday.

Key Conservatives Come Around on GOP Health Plan
Republican Study Committee leaders sign off, but Freedom Caucus still wary

Walker and several members of the Republican Study Committee voiced their support for the GOP health plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Several key Republicans on Friday endorsed the health care overhaul bill crafted by GOP leaders and the White House, saying President Donald Trump had agreed to changes they favored minutes earlier during an Oval Office meeting. With a vote on the so-called American Health Care Act scheduled for this coming Thursday in the House, the news was welcomed by supporters of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

3 GOP Dissenters as Budget Committee Passes Health Care Plan
Reps. Sanford, Brat, Palmer vote against sending to full House

Rep. Dave Brat, R-Va., was one of three House Freedom Caucus members to vote against the health care plan in the Budget Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Budget Committee on Thursday approved 19-17 a motion to send the Republican legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care to the full House for consideration.

Republican Reps. Mark Sanford of South Carolina, Dave Brat of Virginia, and Gary Palmer of Alabama — all members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus — voted against the motion, despite a plea from panel chairwoman Diane Black of Tennessee.

What the GOP Wants to Keep or Gut from Obamacare
One Republican health plan is heading toward the House floor next week

GOP leaders, including pictured Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Budget Committee Chairman Diane Black, R-Tenn., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., held a news conference Tuesday as the group continues to pitch a repeal and replace plan in the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By RANDY LEONARD and ERIN MERSHON CQ Roll Call

A GOP proposal to repeal and replace portions of the 2010 health care law is making its way though the House, but it faces an uncertain fate.

CBO: Lower Deficit, More Uninsured Under House Health Plan
Nonpartisan budget scorekeepers predict savings, uninsured would grow

Speaker Paul Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy have been pushing their health plan hard. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 8:37 p.m. | The House Republican leadership’s legislation to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law would reduce the deficit by $337 billion over a decade while increasing the number of uninsured by 24 million people by 2026, the Congressional Budget Office estimated Monday.

The nonpartisan budget scorekeepers predicted that under the House GOP plan — which was scheduled for consideration by the House Budget Committee on Thursday to be packaged as a reconciliation bill that would only require a majority to pass in the Senate —  the biggest savings would come as a result of decreased funding to Medicaid and cutting off subsidies for individuals to purchase insurance on the health care exchanges. It would also lower average premiums enough to stabilize the individual health insurance market, according to the “score” of the legislation.

Work on Fiscal 2018 Budget On Hold
More focus on health care bill

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., says that Congress’ budget is not necessarily President Donald Trump’s budget. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Work on the fiscal 2018 budget resolution appears on hold until after Congress passes a repeal of the 2010 health care law.

But Republicans on the Budget and Appropriations committees do not appear concerned about the delayed timeline or the upcoming budget request from the White House, which will ask lawmakers to increase defense discretionary spending by $54 billion and pay for it by an equal cut to domestic discretionary spending bills.

Senate Budget Rule Could Hamper GOP Push on Defense, Taxes
Republicans are already divided over how much to cut spending

Republicans on the House Budget Committee, led by Tennessee Rep. Diane Black, are already beginning to struggle with how much money to allocate to national defense and other funding categories as they work on the next budget resolution. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A little-known Senate budget rule could pose a huge challenge to the GOP’s top priorities of increasing defense spending and cutting taxes this year. 

Providing more funds to the military and rewriting the tax code both depend on the House and Senate agreeing to a fiscal 2018 budget resolution. The fiscal blueprint would set an enforceable topline for appropriators and provide reconciliation instructions allowing a tax overhaul to advance in the Senate with a simple 51-vote majority.

Trump: Massive Funding Hike Would Help Military Get ‘Best Deals’
Foes ‘in big, big trouble’ if I have to use military force, president says

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the U.S. Navy and shipyard workers on Thursday, onboard the USS Gerald R. Ford, an aircraft carrier that is being built in Newport News, Virginia. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday, surrounded by U.S. Navy personnel aboard a massive aircraft carrier, again promised the largest military buildup in some time — but he faces an uphill fight to garner ample congressional support. 

Trump used the USS Gerald R. Ford, a not-yet-active Navy warship docked at a shipyard in southeastern Virginia, as the stage for his first major national security speech since becoming the commander in chief. He described the U.S. military as a depleted force, and again said his coming fiscal 2018 budget plan will propose more Pentagon spending to begin buying new combat platforms.