Dianne Feinstein

Word on the Hill: House Men’s Workout
Vegan cooking and snacking

Oklahoma Rep. Markwayne Mullin, seen here with his daughter Larra at the Capitol on Wednesday, is a host of the annual men's workout. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As if you haven’t had enough bipartisan congressional athletic events, the annual Men’s Health Caucus workout is this morning, hosted by Reps. Markwayne Mullin, R-Okla., and Donald M. Payne Jr., D-N.J.

It’s at 7 a.m. in the park across from the Longworth House Office Building. Samantha Clayton, director of Global Fitness at Herbalife Nutrition, and Clifton Crosby, former NFL player, will also be there.

Word on the Hill: Happy Birthday, Dianne Feinstein!
‘Game of Thrones’ and Japanese agriculture

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein arrives at the Capitol for the Senate Democrats’ policy lunch in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s Dianne Feinstein’s birthday. The oldest currently serving senator turns 84 today. The California Democrat has been in the Senate since 1992.

Feinstein also happens to share a birthday with other powerful Democrats in Congress: Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts turns 68 today.

Balancing the First Amendment and Students’ Safety
Senate panel discusses free speech on college campuses

UNITED STATES — Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., took part in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the issue of free speech on college campuses. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Zachary Wood arrived at Williams College his freshman year, he had high hopes for an academic environment that challenged his views. Now going into his senior year, Wood says he has faced backlash from students and administrators for inviting controversial speakers to campus.

Wood appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, part of a panel discussing free speech on college campuses.

Grassley to Justice Department: No Answers, No Nominee
Judiciary chairman wants responses to at least 15 letters first

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley is holding up the nomination of the assistant attorney general for legislative affairs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley is tired of his requests to the Justice Department going unanswered — and he’s fighting back yet again.

The Iowa Republican announced Thursday that the committee won’t advance the nomination of Stephen Boyd to be assistant attorney general for legislative affairs until he gets responses to at least 15 letters, some due more than six months ago.

Legislative Agenda Gets Tougher for Trump
Even before Comey issue, Capitol Hill efforts were plodding

President Donald Trump speaks on May 4 while flanked by House Republicans in the Rose Garden after they passed legislation aimed at repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law. Trump will need to keep them on his side to pass his agenda as legal experts say James B. Comey bolstered a possible obstruction of justice case against him. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is declaring victory despite scathing testimony against him by former FBI Director James B. Comey. But that likely will further complicate his domestic agenda and transform the 2018 midterms into a referendum on his actions related to the bureau’s investigation into Russian meddling in U.S. elections.

Comey did not land a knockout blow on the president during hours of dramatic testimony Thursday. But some experts say he presented a strong case that the president obstructed justice when Trump leaned on him to drop a probe of his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, and then allegedly fired Comey for refusing to do so.

Trump Declares Victory in Wake of Comey Testimony
President accuses former FBI director with 'so many false statements and lies'

Former FBI Director James Comey testifies Thursday during a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing. On Friday, President Trump declared feeling “total and complete vindication.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump declared victory Friday morning in the wake of sometimes-scathing testimony by James Comey, the former FBI director he fired amidst an investigation of his presidential campaign.

Just before 6:30 a.m., the early rising chief executive tweeted that he feels “total and complete vindication.”

Word on the Hill: Calm After the Storm
Security increased for Capital Pride weekend

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein wore a seersucker suit Thursday in honor of National Seersucker Day in the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Things on Capitol Hill should have settled down today, a day after former FBI Director James B. Comey’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Members of Congress and senators have skipped town and headed home.

The Day in Photos: Comey Testifies at Senate Intel as D.C. Looks On
June 8 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Former FBI Director James B. Comey, right, is greeted Thursday by Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr, center, and Vice Chairman Mark Warner before testifying about his conversations with President Donald Trump and the Russia investigation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Nuclear Waste Deadlock Hurts Industry, Say Senate Appropriators
‘What I see is a big downward slope for the industry’

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein is concerned that there will be stasis over the debate on where to store the nation's nuclear waste. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Leaders on the Senate Energy-Water Appropriations Subcommittee agreed Wednesday that the fiscal 2018 spending bill needs to include a path forward on the nation’s nuclear waste stalemate — or risk accelerating the industry’s decline.

In a hearing to examine the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s fiscal 2018 budget request, the top Democrat on the subcommittee, California’s Dianne Feinstein, questioned the viability of the nuclear industry if a nuclear waste policy stasis takes hold of Congress.

Here Are the 8 Republicans and 7 Democrats Questioning Comey
John McCain and other ex-officio members could make special appearance

Former FBI Director James B. Comey will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

James B. Comey is undeniably the star of the show Thursday, when he comes to the main hearing room in the Hart Senate Office Building for his first public testimony since President Donald Trump fired him as FBI director a month ago. But the eight Republican and seven Democratic senators on the Select Intelligence Committee have highly important roles.

That’s because their questioning will go a long way to shaping whether the national television audience views the congressional investigation of Russian meddling in last year’s election as thorough and serious — or just more partisan posturing.