Don Beyer Jr

House Defeats Amendment to Cut One-Third of CBO Staff
‘It was CBO’s reluctance to change their erroneous forecasts’

Rep. Morgan Griffith, R-Va., offered the amendment that would have gotten rid of an 89-person CBO budget analysis division. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Wednesday night rejected, 116-309, an amendment that would have eliminated one-third of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The amendment, offered by Virginia Republican Morgan Griffith to the four-bill appropriations minibus the House is currently debating, would have abolished CBO’s 89-employee budget analysis division and saved a total of $15 million in salaries. Roughly half of Republicans joined Democrats in voting down the amendment.

Four Members Sued Over Rainbow Flags
Plaintiff says flag is religious symbol for the ‘homosexual denomination’

California Rep. Susan Davis posted a photo of the gay pride flag hanging outside her office alongside U.S. and California flags. (Courtesy Davis’ office)

Four Democratic lawmakers are being sued by an opponent of LGBTQ rights for displaying a gay pride flag in front of their offices.

The lawsuit is being brought by Chris Sevier, a lawyer opposed to same-sex marriage, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Judge Narrows Trump's Travel Ban Enforcement

From left, Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., and Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., protested the administration's travel ban when it was unveiled earlier this year.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump administration can’t stop grandparents and other relatives of someone in the United States from entering the country under its enforcement of the revised travel ban, a federal judge in Hawaii ruled late Thursday.

The ruling is a legal setback for President Donald Trump’s temporary ban against travelers from six majority-Muslim countries, and could prompt the government to take the issue back to the Supreme Court during the justices’ summer recess.

Voting Rights Battle Just Getting Underway
Two Democratic bills introduced before Trump commission’s sweeping request to states

New Orleans voter Albertine Reid leaves the booth at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward on Election Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even before the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity raised alarms with its sweeping requests for state voter data, House Democrats rolled out legislation they hope will ensure the voting process is fair.

One measure, introduced at a news conference on Capitol Hill on June 22, would restore voter protections across 13 mostly Southern states. Sponsored by Alabama’s Terri A. Sewell and Georgia’s John Lewis, a civil rights icon, the measure is a response to the Supreme Court’s 2013 Shelby v. Holder decision. That ruling struck down provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required those states to seek federal approval before changing voter laws and also set a formula for determining which states would be subject to the law. 

Word on the Hill: Democrats Pick Impeachment Over Alcohol
Survey asked if people would give up drinking for Trump’s impeachment

Scott Preston, center, and other guests watch the final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at Capitol Lounge in Washington on Oct. 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A solid majority of Democrats said they would give up alcohol for the remainder of their lives if it meant President Donald Trump would be impeached tomorrow, according to a survey conducted by Detox.net.

The website, which works to help drug and alcohol addicts get sober, asked more than 1,000 Americans what they would give up drinking for. Seventy-three percent of Democrats surveyed said they would choose impeachment over alcohol. Only 17 percent of Republicans who took the survey said the same.

Defeated Lawmakers Trek From the Hill to Middle Earth — And Beyond
Life after Congress has included ambassadorships for dozens

Former Sen. Scott Brown was nominated by President Donald Trump to be U.S. ambassador to New Zealand. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If three makes a trend and four creates a pattern, then dispatching favored congressional losers to New Zealand has become not just a sliver but a pillar of the American diplomatic order. 

When Scott Brown takes over the embassy in Wellington by this summer — his confirmation virtually assured thanks to the endorsements of both Democratic senators who have defeated him — the onetime matinee idol for Republican centrists will become the fourth former member of Congress who’s assumed that particular ambassadorship after being rejected by the voters.

New Faces on Congressional Baseball Teams — Including a Woman
2016 election leads to some roster moves on both sides

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, left, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise celebrate after the Republicans' 8-7 victory in the 55th Congressional Baseball Game in 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There will be a few new faces on the field at the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game on June 15.

The teams begin practice with a few freshman lawmakers on their rosters and some players lost in the shuffle of the 2016 election.

Connolly Intern Sows Father’s Seeds of Peace for Gaza
Yousef Bashir has faith in a peaceful solution to Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Yousef Bashir, a Gaza native, is an intern in Virginia Rep. Gerald E. Connolly’s office. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The future president of a Palestinian state might be working as an intern in Democratic Rep. Gerald E. Connolly’s office. 

“No pressure, huh?” Yousef Bashir replies to the Virginia lawmaker’s assertion about his future and the two laugh.

Democrats Have Few Options on Trump Travel Ban
Minority status means they can’t file a lawsuit or force legislation

From left, Reps. Don Beyer,  John Delaney, Gerry Connolly and Jamie Raskin (not pictured here) speak to the press and protesters about possible detention of travelers and legal access at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. Protests erupted at airports around the country following Trump’s executive order restricting travel from several Islamic countries. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional Democrats were quick to condemn President Donald Trump’s new executive order temporarily barring travel from a handful of predominantly Muslim countries, but there isn’t much they can do about it.

As the minority party in the House and Senate, they cannot force Congress to take up legislation overturning the ban. And legal and procedural hurdles prevent Democratic lawmakers from taking the order to court themselves. 

Trump Travel Ban Part II Could Put GOP in Tough Spot
Defying polls, president signs second executive order

Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., speaks with an ACLU legal observer during the protest at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Jan. 29. Protests erupted at airports around the country following President Trump’s since-frozen executive order restricting travel from several Islamic countries; on Monday, he signed a revised version. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump’s second generation travel ban on individuals from several Muslim-majority countries could put his fellow Republicans in a tough spot.

The new order, signed Monday, comes after federal courts blocked an earlier version and despite polls showing most Americans oppose it.