Don Beyer Jr

Politicians Lose Press Club Spelling Bee to Media Again
Rep. Ted Deutch, the last politician standing, lost to Dallas Morning News’ Todd Gillman

Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., smiles before being asked to spell "rubicund" at the National Press Club Spelling Bee on Tuesday. On the right is Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., and eventual winner Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News is at left. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

The media team won the National Press Club Spelling Bee for the second year in a row when Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News correctly spelled “somatotype.”

The annual spelling bee pits the media against members of Congress to raise money for the National Press Club Journalism Institute.

Word on the Hill: Busy Week
Your social calendar for the week

Events all over D.C. to explore this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Monday and welcome back.

This week is packed with things to do around the D.C. area.

Beyer on the Words That Made His Spelling Bee Career
Virginia Democrat tries to win back his National Press Club Spelling Bee title

Members of the politicians’ team after the National Press Club Spelling Bee in 2015. From left, Rep. Brad Ashford of Nebraska, Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. of New Jersey, the winner Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr. of Virginia, Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, and Rep. Tom Emmer of Minnesota. (Courtesy Noel St. John/National Press Club)

In one of Washington’s most beloved nerdfests, members of Congress will take on members of the D.C. media in the National Press Club Spelling Bee on Tuesday.

Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr., who won for the politicians’ team in 2015, has redemption on his mind.

Word on the Hill: Drawing a Line on Good Taste
Opioid discussion, one week until the Press Club’s spelling bee

From left, Steve Hendrickson as Frank Butley, Jacqueline Correa as Tania Del Valle, Dan Domingues as Pablo Del Valle, and Sally Wingert as Virginia Butley in “Native Gardens,” running through Oct. 22 at Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater. (Courtesy Dan Norman/Guthrie Theater)

Native Gardens” opened at the Mead Center for American Theater on Friday. The play runs until Oct. 22 at the center’s Arena Stage.

The comedy features actors Jacqueline Correa and Dan Domingues as Tania and Pablo Del Valle, a couple who move to Washington, D.C., next door to Frank and Virginia Butley, played by Steve Hendrickson and Sally Wingert. Pablo is a young lawyer and Tania is a pregnant Ph.D. candidate while the Butleys are a deeply rooted D.C. couple.

7 Ways Trump’s Arizona Speech Complicates Congress’ Fall Agenda
President threatens a shutdown, criticizes senators and their chamber’s rules

President Donald and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, pictured shaking hands after Trump's address to Congress in February, are at odds over willingness to shutdown the government and change the Senate's filibuster rules. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Short on legislative accomplishments so far in his tenure, President Donald Trump went out of his way to complicate Congress’ fall legislative agenda during a campaign-style rally in Phoenix, Arizona, on Tuesday.

Here are seven ways in just that one speech that Trump said things that don’t bode well for his ability to work with Congress:

House Defeats Amendment to Cut One-Third of CBO Staff
‘It was CBO’s reluctance to change their erroneous forecasts’

Rep. Morgan Griffith, R-Va., offered the amendment that would have gotten rid of an 89-person CBO budget analysis division. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Wednesday night rejected, 116-309, an amendment that would have eliminated one-third of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The amendment, offered by Virginia Republican Morgan Griffith to the four-bill appropriations minibus the House is currently debating, would have abolished CBO’s 89-employee budget analysis division and saved a total of $15 million in salaries. Roughly half of Republicans joined Democrats in voting down the amendment.

Four Members Sued Over Rainbow Flags
Plaintiff says flag is religious symbol for the ‘homosexual denomination’

California Rep. Susan Davis posted a photo of the gay pride flag hanging outside her office alongside U.S. and California flags. (Courtesy Davis’ office)

Four Democratic lawmakers are being sued by an opponent of LGBTQ rights for displaying a gay pride flag in front of their offices.

The lawsuit is being brought by Chris Sevier, a lawyer opposed to same-sex marriage, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Judge Narrows Trump's Travel Ban Enforcement

From left, Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., and Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., protested the administration's travel ban when it was unveiled earlier this year.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump administration can’t stop grandparents and other relatives of someone in the United States from entering the country under its enforcement of the revised travel ban, a federal judge in Hawaii ruled late Thursday.

The ruling is a legal setback for President Donald Trump’s temporary ban against travelers from six majority-Muslim countries, and could prompt the government to take the issue back to the Supreme Court during the justices’ summer recess.

Voting Rights Battle Just Getting Underway
Two Democratic bills introduced before Trump commission’s sweeping request to states

New Orleans voter Albertine Reid leaves the booth at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward on Election Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even before the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity raised alarms with its sweeping requests for state voter data, House Democrats rolled out legislation they hope will ensure the voting process is fair.

One measure, introduced at a news conference on Capitol Hill on June 22, would restore voter protections across 13 mostly Southern states. Sponsored by Alabama’s Terri A. Sewell and Georgia’s John Lewis, a civil rights icon, the measure is a response to the Supreme Court’s 2013 Shelby v. Holder decision. That ruling struck down provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required those states to seek federal approval before changing voter laws and also set a formula for determining which states would be subject to the law. 

Word on the Hill: Democrats Pick Impeachment Over Alcohol
Survey asked if people would give up drinking for Trump’s impeachment

Scott Preston, center, and other guests watch the final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at Capitol Lounge in Washington on Oct. 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A solid majority of Democrats said they would give up alcohol for the remainder of their lives if it meant President Donald Trump would be impeached tomorrow, according to a survey conducted by Detox.net.

The website, which works to help drug and alcohol addicts get sober, asked more than 1,000 Americans what they would give up drinking for. Seventy-three percent of Democrats surveyed said they would choose impeachment over alcohol. Only 17 percent of Republicans who took the survey said the same.