Library of Congress

Report: DeMint On His Way Out at Heritage Foundation
Former senator moved the organization into a more combative role

Former Sen. Jim DeMint stepped down in 2012. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Sen. Jim DeMint is expected to be ousted from his role as president of the conservative Heritage Foundation, according to multiple reports.

DeMint had been criticized for moving the think tank toward a more combative approach, Politico reported. He had also moved to align the organization closer toward President Donald Trump. 

Democrats Come Around on Stopgap Spending Bill
Minority party coalesces to support government funding

House Democrats coalesced at the last minute to vote with Republicans on a one-week stop gap spending measure that will keep the government open one more week. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Democrats backed off threats to oppose a stopgap spending bill to keep the government funded, allowing the chamber to overwhelmingly pass the measure as Congress faces a midnight deadline to keep money flowing to the government.

The continuing resolution that would fund the government until May 5 passed the chamber 382-30. Lawmakers expect to introduce and pass a spending measure next week that would keep the government running until the end of the fiscal year September 30.

Auto Bailout Chief of Staff to Run Against Trott
Haley Stevens calls incumbent ‘out of touch,’ wants to ‘bring people together’ in Washington

A spokesman for Rep. Dave Trott, R-Mich., called challenger Haley Stevens a “carpetbagger.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Haley Stevens, who was chief of staff for the Obama administration’s auto bailout, announced Thursday that she’ll challenge Michigan Republican Rep. Dave Trott next year.

Trott appears “out of touch,” Stevens told the Detroit News, and there is a general “dysfunction” in Congress.

Chaffetz Recovering from Surgery
Says he’ll ‘absolutely’ be back

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, had surgery to remove screws and a metal plate from his foot that he broke 12 years ago. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jason Chaffetz underwent successful foot surgery at the University of Utah and is now recovering.

Chaffetz had previously said he was having surgery to remove screws and a metal plate doctors installed 12 years ago after he broke his foot in a fall while working in his garage.

As GOP Tax Overhaul Shapes Up, Democrats Push To End The Tax Return
Taxpayers might love return-free filing, but the tax preparation industry does not

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is leading the latest effort for return-free tax filing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin promised the “largest tax reform in the history of our country” on Wednesday as the White House and congressional Republicans gear up for a major overhaul.

But while their plans emphasize large tax cuts for corporations and more modest ones for individuals, some Democrats are promoting something far more radical: the end of the tax return.

Photos of the Week: Science and Pot Protests, a Senate Bus Ride and Kids on the Hill
The week of April 24 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Archer Somodevilla, son of Getty Images photojournalist Chip Somodevilla, takes photos during Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan's weekly news conference in the Capitol on Thursday. Thursday was "Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Simone Biles Tries to Get Shelley Moore Capito to Dance on TV
Gymnast and her ‘Dancing with the Stars’ partner were in the Capitol for Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day

West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, carrying her 3-year-old grandson Charlie, walks with multiple Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles to an event on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Olympic gymnast Simone Biles tried to put some pressure Thursday on Sen. Shelley Moore Capito to dance on TV.

But Biles and her ‘Dancing with the Stars’ partner Sasha Farber couldn’t quite get through to the West Virginia Republican.

Inside Elections: What You Need to Know About the Gubernatorial Landscape
 

While most of Washington’s focus is on the 2018 midterms, 38 states are also having gubernatorial elections in the next two years. Roll Call Election Analyst Nathan L. Gonzales takes a look at key governor races and how their outcomes could affect the balance of power in Congress. Virginia and New Jersey will both select governors in 2017, the rest of the elections happen in 2018.

Spending Shutdown Showdown Fizzling Out
Issues remain, but biggest fights getting knocked out ahead of deadline

From left, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Reps. David McKinley, R-W.Va., and Mike Doyle, D-Pa., attend a news conference at the House Triangle with the United Mine Workers of America on the Miners Protection Act, which would address expiring health care and pension benefits. Funding the miners’ benefits is one of the remaining issues that could affect the debate over government funding. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first federal funding fight of President Donald Trump’s administration might be ending not with a bang but a whimper. 

House and Senate lawmakers negotiating an omnibus bill to fund the government through the end of September had said the biggest outstanding dispute was over cost-sharing subsidy payments to insurance companies that help lower-income people afford health care under the 2010 overhaul law.

The Important Connection Between Governors and Congress
A first look at the gubernatorial race ratings for 2017-18

South Dakota Rep. Krisit Noem is a candidate for governor in 2018 and leaves behind a safe Republican seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In Washington, it’s easy to ignore governors as distant rulers over far away lands. But now is a good time to start paying attention to what’s happening in state races.

Voters in 38 states (including nine of the 10 most populated) will elect a governor over the next two years, and the results have a direct connection to Capitol Hill. The large number of races give aspiring (or weary) members an opportunity to leave the House, and consequently, leave behind potentially vulnerable open seats. And governors in 28 of those states will have a role (specifically veto power) in the next round of redistricting, which will impact what party controls the House in the next decade.